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      Welcome to the forum!   09/17/2017

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/25/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    While I don't exactly relish the idea of having a condition named after a Nazi collaborator, it doesn't and shouldn't detract from the body of research subsequently conducted on Asperger's syndrome, even if it was in his name. This body of research has helped a lot of people like myself gain recognition, closure and support for a difficult life, due to having this condition. Whatever happened in the past doesn't change the present day reality for me and thousands of others with the condition. It doesn't change who I am, and it doesn't change my condition, or that of those affected by it. We need to take what we can learn from the past, and use that to build on and improve our present reality. In any case, the term Asperger's is to be dropped by the medical profession in favour of ASD. While the holocaust and other Nazi atrocities should never be forgotten, people will stop using the term Asperger's, and that will become a thing of the past.
  2. 2 points
    I very rarely watch the news, I hate politics and to be honest I don't give a shit about any of it, all I bother about is my kids and family and what bit of the house to decorate next. Life is too short to think about all the sadness in the world, so stop thinking about it and do something that makes you happy
  3. 2 points
    Nobody really knows where Asperger's true political views lay but, yes, it's correct to say the whole Asperger phenomenon owes its research to the Nazi regime. Ultimately the idea was to eradicate all those children suspected of being imperfect. That includes the mentally ill. Asperger's job was to collect a range of children with obvious defects in order to determine whether they served any purpose whatsoever or should be eradicated. It seems clear what did interest the researchers about the children was the much discussed lack of "empathy" which I imagine appealed to the current party. Also the scientific bent of the children and the unorthodox intelligence test results. Not only was Asperger involved but also the Lebensborn children who were supposed to be a future perfect generation. I found out by curiosity one of my favourite actresses Marta Kristen was one of those children. The Nazi Party was deeply involved in the study of ESP so after the war defeat of Germany much of the research ended up in the USSR. Other research ended up in America so both the USSR and America used the research in Nazi Germany for the study of ESP. Not only that, but America's V" rocket (that saved the Apollo Space program) was a German research project. That includes most of the NASA Apollo team as well. From the original post, this seems to have come as something as a shock and probably upsetting. I think its safe to say these children would be used merely as a stepping stone to try and produce different types of human beings. There would have been some attempt perhaps to "breed out" the bad stuff such as the rages and stims but try and encourage the lack of empathy and the dedication to fields of interest. The good news? We are where we are today. Since those times I think we learned (or ought to have learned) it's folly to mess with nature and genes. Look at how German Shepherd dogs went on to develop severe hip mobility issues (it happened to my own Shepherd). Besides, I happen to think defects exist for a reason anyway. Someone elsewhere had this to say: "The torturous acts committed by the Nazis happened in the past, and I believe I speak for everyone else here when I say that they should stay in the past. Bringing up evidence from such unethical experiments into modern day research is wrong and disrespectful to those who have died, and those who survived, the holocaust. With over 14% of doctors in the U.S being Jewish, I doubt anyone would support examining the human experiments to find little to no new information." Maybe the feeling got strong enough to want to break from association with Asperger. "
  4. 2 points
    As regards the specific allegations about Asperger we need to be cautious - they may well be contested. Speaking more generally though there are all too many instances of people who have made great contributions in many fields whom we later discover have also done some dreadful things. An achievement remains an achievement irrespective of what the person has done elsewhere in their life although I would accept that it can be hard to look upon such a person in a positive way if we later discover such information. In some cases their reputation is destroyed. We'll have to wait and see what happens in this case but if the allegations are found to be well-grounded - or at least not disproved - the condition would almost certainly be renamed. In recent years there has been a movement to drop the specific diagnosis of AS and replace it more broadly with autism. i feel this is a good move for various reasons apart from the issues mentioned above. Many people in society still have little idea what Asperger's Syndrome is - some may even think it refers to a mental or physical illness. The term "syndrome" also suggests an illness, disease or disorder which we are trying to get away from. I prefer now to refer to "autistic spectrum difference" which I feel is less judgemental and clearly makes the broader link to autism which I feel is better (though far from perfectly) understood. There is of course the issue of trying to distinguish between types of autism and the term Asperger's Syndrome was useful in a highlighting a specific form. "High functioning autism" is not always considered the same as AS but may be a better term to use instead although we know the term "high functioning" can give the false impression that those with the condition have few difficulties in life. There are other alternative possibilities for names but I feel one which specifically refers to autism is necessary.
  5. 2 points
    i would certainly agree with David that diagnosis - and non-diagnosis - does not end the matter. Diagnosis of AS remains a very inexact process and much depends on the perspective (and competence) of the clinician. Some people are wrongly told they don't have AS but there are others who are wrongly diagnosed as having it. There's no easy solution to this as the criteria for diagnosis depend on interpretation. Diagnosis has certainly widened considerably over the last few decades and Hans Asperger probably conceived it as having a much narrower interpretation to refer to children with profound difficulties. It is good that we have recognised in more recent times how autism can affect broader sections of the population and that those people can receive recognition of being affected and get some support (unfortunately often rather limited but a step in the right direction). While more people are being diagnosed with ASD some who have the condition do miss out and I would recommend anyone who feels this has happened to get a second opinion although I know that may not be easy to obtain. After weighing up the evidence a clinician may correctly decide that someone doesn't have AS. However although they may not pass the "threshold" they may still have elements of the condition and these need to be recognised.
  6. 2 points
    I'm not really following what you are trying to say. I was diagnosed with Autism (high functioning) as a young child, then was diagnosed with schizophrenia in my early twenties, when it commonly develops. I find them two very separate things - Autism is part of me whereas schizophrenia is a definite illness, like if I developed diabetes or something. There was a time when I was having symptoms of schizophrenia yet nobody knew because I think the negative symptoms (withdrawal, isolation, lack of self care, anger etc) do seem like autism. Although, now I can definitely differentiate between the two like if I'm having more schizophrenia symptoms, I know it's that or if I'm having sensory overload, I know it's autism. I don't really think like that though, I just live my life! I hate the stigma surrounding schizophrenia. Very few people with schizophrenia are dangerous - they may only appear intimidating if you meet them during a psychotic episode in which case they are genuinely ill and mean no harm - they are probably more scared than you . Most people with schizophrenia lead happy, healthy and fulfilling lives, even holding down jobs and marriages etc.
  7. 2 points
    This is National Autistic Society's World Autism Awareness Week video. What do you think? I like it. I like how it's used an adult autistic woman and I totally relate to it.
  8. 2 points
    This is not true. Depression is caused by chemical imbalances in the brain, you should not be diagnosed with depression if you are sad because of 'something external that happened'. It is normal to feel sad or bad if something sad or bad happens to you. While you may need help if you can't shake the depression caused by an external issue this is not clinical depression and shouldn't be diagnosed as such, antidepressants are not usually prescribed for this (therapy is) it is a normal response to something happening. Depression is when you feel sad, bad or numb for no external reason.
  9. 2 points
    Channel 4 broadcast a documentary called "Are You Autistic?" a couple of days ago - I'm not sure if it were a repeat as it seems to have been made last year and Nesf highlighted the questionnaire used in the research behind the show (I can't find her thread). If you're in the UK you can see the documentary at: http://www.channel4.com/programmes/are-you-autistic While it had some useful elements overall I was disappointed with this programme. Presumably it was aimed at a general audience with limited or no knowledge of autism. If so I suspect they would have gone away with little idea of how autism affects people's lives. Almost all those featured in the programme were young women and while accepting that many women are undiagnosed this seemed an odd choice. Apart from the two individuals seeking a diagnosis we learned little about autism affected the lives of the others who spoke on screen. As regards the diagnosis process the two individuals were to get their answer after one session - admittedly with an acclaimed expert but still a far cry from the protracted and tortuous process most encounter. Overall the documentary seemed rather superficial and less effective than some of the others highlighted on this forum. Autism is such a broad and complex issue it really needs a series which can really get into depth and fully explore a wider range of characteristics and individuals on the spectrum. It's still worth seeing and maybe others may find it more informative.
  10. 1 point
    Asperger's syndrome has already been removed from the latest edition of the DSM, though it still gets a brief mention in the ICD.
  11. 1 point
    I don't know if anyone has heard, but Nick Mason will be playing early (which I would interpret as meaning pre-1971) Pink Floyd material with a new supergroup named after the Saucerful of Secrets album. Even though I'm most partial to the 70s material, it's nice to see this era getting some appreciation, since the rest of the band quickly distanced themselves from it, playing very little of it live. http://ultimateclassicrock.com/nick-mason-saucerful-of-secrets-band/ Website: http://www.thesaucerfulofsecrets.com
  12. 1 point
    If you have access to the BBC I-Player you may want to watch a half-hour documentary called "Help Save My Child": https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09zct6v/bbc-scotland-investigates-2018-2-help-me-save-my-child It's about the problems of several youngsters with autism who have major behavioural problems and / or serious mental health difficulties and the problems they and their parents have in getting appropriate education, health care and support.
  13. 1 point
    I think so far as concerns me personally I seem to have discovered something unusual about autism. One thing is for sure I experience part of it very differently to others. Not that I don't get the same main symptoms such as sensory issues, empathy and non verbal language. I get all of that but there is one big difference. I won't say what it is but suffice it to say all this started out as a puzzle. It took many years to first realise I don't process information in any way similar to normal people. I thought all people were the same so the tricky bit was identifying the differences. Then it was a gradual process. Psychologists will look at all of this academically by comparing data and drawing similarities based on how all people react to stress. To me though part of this is like discussing how you ride a bike but never experiencing getting on one and pedaling. It is as hard for me to understand neurotypical thought because really that way of processing information is alien. Although I am not good at diagnosing other people I can at least connect all the dots that relate to my own experience. Part of this I can associate with other people on the AS spectrum but not the full scope of it. I also have a theory that Hans Asperger was researching autism for motives beyond merely trying to decide if the defect merited elimination.
  14. 1 point
    I stumbled upon the website of Candice Hilligoss which is here: http://www.candacehilligoss.com/ This turns out to be quite an interesting site for me as it features interviews with the cast and director. There is also an on-site location tour of the movie site. The funny thing is this was Candice Hilligoss's only big on screen role and she never became an established actress. I always had a kind of interest in actors who appeared in older movies.
  15. 1 point
    Here is a clip from Carnival Of Souls. You find that such clips get hardly any comments on sites like YouTube. It's an old movie, of course, and older movies contained far more psychological content and deeper plots than modern films. In this clip Mary opens up to her psychologist. I recall when I first saw this scene, all I could think was, "Wow, that's just how I feel!". Notice, though, when the psychologist turns around at the end of the scene, reality suddenly shifts again and Mary turns out to be in her car. The guy who scripted the movie was Herk Harvey and I tried reading all I could about his personal history and artistic interest. I really found nothing to indicate to suggest he had any connection to either psychology or any signs of personal symptoms of A.S. "He grew up in Waverly, Illinois and in Fort Collins and was a graduate of Fort Collins High School before serving in the U.S. Navy as a Quartermaster, 3rd Class, during World War II, during which time he was studying chemical engineering. 'But when I got out," Harvey has said, "I decided that wasn't for me and so I went into the theater.'"
  16. 1 point
    It was David rather than yourself who referred to AS being seen by some as a "cool" even desirable condition. I think that very few people have such an idea but if they do it is because - as you say - they wrongly associate it with a "quirky" personality (or wrongly believe it gives someone incredible "gifts", e.g. brilliance in science and maths). I also agree that they don't think about all the other issues that come with AS such as social and communication difficulties. They may also be the sorts of people who find an AS character in a TV show or film interesting and entertaining but - if they meet one in real life - are much less positive. This is often the way in life that people can engage with a media stereotype of a personality but find the reality much less to their liking and that is when we see the negative attitudes emerging.
  17. 1 point
    "When people think of autism they might see it as the low functioning kind while asperger's is often seen as the high functioning kind. I feel that combining the different types of autism into one diagnosis (ASD) which is what happened in the DSM-5, was a bad idea. Asperger's is a term still used, but if someone on the spectrum tells someone they have autism or ASD, the person may get the wrong idea. Unless the person already knows the person with ASD pretty well, then they might be confused by the term autism or ASD. They may associate those terms with the lower end of the autism spectrum. That's why I'm in favor of using the term asperger's or high functioning autism." The question here, Nichii, is the one that first needs to be solved: Are Asperger Syndrome and Autism (high-functioning) the same? You see, my point all along here has been too many psychologists and neurologists are simply not agreeing. In science this is not possible. To move ahead to understanding, each step along the way needs to be "pinned". The way that helps me is to first of all try and determine what autism is. I have an advantage here compared to psychologists as I "am" autistic and I know what it feels like to be in that situation. I see autism as divided into two aspects: (1) Delay in development. If the autism is (high-functioning) this simply means the delays don't cause very low intelligence or being "simple". It can cause learning difficulties, for sure, and it can cause us to lag behind in education (due to the various stresses linked to socialisation). However, it is not like being simple. From my own experiences, other delays can be social awkwardness, emotional development delay, immaturity, co-ordination, empathy, sexual development, personality development and so on. (2) Withdrawing. "Autism" is like "selfism". You go inwards. In cases where you can control the inwardness, it can be really good for science (I think it was Einstein's edge).Often, though, the withdrawing can lead to suspicion and distrust. You refer to others as "them". We're supposed to be connected to the team mentality so being a loner is always seen as anti-social and an illness. With regard to Asperger's as a personality type, the best case I can think of is Lieutenant Columbo in the TV series. His autism characteristics seem to me to be very shallow but he definitely has AS traits. He is definitely clumsy (there is one episode where he stands on the fringe of an Arab ambassador's robe and you hear it tear). He talks to his dog. He doesn't know how to behave that well when invited into homes and keeps boring people about his wife. He is very scruffy and not very clean (unshaven and hair all over the place). He has awesome associative reasoning which enables him to solve homicide cases that leave the rest of his team baffled. Therefore, Columbo is employed by the L.A.P.D. In my view he is only just about employable and, not only that, he's married as well. I would say that guy does have A.S. but on a scale that doesn't leave him totally excluded from a career and a life. I don't see him so strongly as being autistic because he does interact (just not as well to ever be employed in other roles). I read part of the reasons for doing away with the A.S. diagnosis and resorting only to autism spectrum diagnosis was the fact levels of A.S. diagnosis had sky-rocketed. I mean, they went ballistic, especially in the U.S.A.. This must be because an awful lot of people could see themselves in Columbo and bridge the gap, whereas it's much more difficult to see yourself in someone with, say, schizophrenia or M.P.D. As you said above, Nichii, people latched onto the "nerd type" A.S. The pity is people like Columbo really do deserve to be diagnosed with A.S. These people may not struggle in ways that are immediately obvious but, over the longer term, they do suffer a heck of a lot by losing friends or being misunderstood. However, although Peter Parker and Columbo may seem pretty similar, Peter Parker is genuinely nerdy.
  18. 1 point
    Quotes on a researcher's study into Hans Asperger himself: "Asperger at first warned against classifying children, writing in 1937 that “it is impossible to establish a rigid set of criteria for a diagnosis.” But right after the Nazi annexation of Austria in 1938 — and the purge of his Jewish and liberal associates from the University of Vienna — Asperger introduced his own diagnosis of social detachment: “autistic psychopathy.” From the same article I quote: "The official diagnosis of Asperger disorder has recently been dropped from the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders because clinicians largely agreed it wasn’t a separate condition from autism. Now, to clarify the point I was making at the start, compare here what one Asperger expert (and diagnosed with the condition) wrote in his analysis: "Personally I think Asperger and autism should not be treated as the same disorder and do deserve separate diagnoses. I have heard that some psychiatrists, who believe Asperger and autism are the same, more or less boycott the current diagnostic criteria and simply give everyone "autism". This is bad because it makes research into the possible differences a priori impossible." So, it's really pretty clear there seems to be disagreement and confusion over Asperger Syndrome. Here, for example, we are now officially told Asperger Syndrome is indeed autism. There is disagreement over whether Asperger was a good guy or an evil Nazi, determined either to eradicate autistic conditions (or maybe try and enhance the traits seen as positive). "Some laud Asperger’s language about the “special abilities” of children on the “most favorable” end of his autistic “range,” speculating that he applied his diagnosis to protect them from Nazi eugenics — a kind of psychiatric Schindler’s list. But this was in keeping with the selective benevolence of Nazi psychiatry; Asperger also warned that “less favorable cases” would “roam the streets” as adults, “grotesque and dilapidated.” Good job I have a sense of humour as I sure do "roam the streets" as one of those "less favourable cases". I still suspect a really good approach is to start examining not just the pattern itself (as Asperger did) but the pattern within the pattern. The probability that Asperger Syndrome contains more than one type of syndrome -all of which have a common root base. I definitely always felt that within the Jewish community, Asperger Syndrome is a frequent personality type and again to quote Paul Cooijman who seems to share my view. By the way, don't take this as in any way sinister (I always admired Jewish culture and artists, scientists like Einstein). "In this respect it should be noted that Ashkenazi Jewish ethnic groups have the highest average I.Q. of any ethnic group, and a highly plausible theory explaining the eugenic effects responsible for that is given by Henry Harpending and others in their article "The Natural History of Ashkenazi Intelligence". It seems reasonable to hypothesize that Asperger in Jews may be a side-effect of their thus genetically raised intelligence and conscientiousness." Great point made by Paul. Myself I noticed Einstein and other great Jewish physicists seem to be so intellectually developed that people try to state they never had autism at all but we need to understand that autism could very well be a highly positive personality type (if we can reduce all the other negative symptoms). Conclusion: We still don't know all that much about A.S. in my view because really nobody agrees, which means it's an open field for further research.
  19. 1 point
    Asperclick is een forum waarop veel interessante, leuke en kleurrijke mensen te vinden zijn. Zo is er bijvoorbeeld Sirius die zijn nickname vaak eer aan doet. Een vrij ernstige jongeman. Maar dat is voor mij absoluut niet een bron van ergernis. Ik mag hem wel, die Sirius. Nesf is een vrouw uit Griekenland die van muziek en bier houdt. Riri is Amerikaans en houdt ook van bier en muziek. Net als Nesf en Riri houdt de Française Joie6 ook van muziek. Ze danst en eet bananen en citrusvruchten voor de energie. Willow is er ook. Een charismatische vrouw die fotografeert en schildert. Asgardian, een sympathieke jongen uit Engeland die bijvoorbeeld van motorsport en films over superhelden houdt. En zo kan ik nog wel even doorgaan over al die interessante mensen op Asperclick, een forum die ik graag bezoek.
  20. 1 point
    I find it essential to sometimes forget what you're expected to feel and just pinpoint what you do feel. So, with derealisation, the truth is what I.experience doesn't match what is typical. By the way I found a lot of Russian psychologists have done talks on this on Youtube. Anyway, for me it is sudden change in perception at 180 degrees. All is as normal and then suddenly it's as if the channel changes. The derealisation is negative. Suddenly you feel alienated from the environment and like being forced to face an ugly reality in the past you refused to face up to. It's an intense awareness of not belonging. The trigger is growing friendships so as you get closer to possible friends, this experience can just happen. Other people, of course, were affected and confused. This is why I have a thing for the 1961 Carnival Of Souls movie as for me it's a film almost with hidden messages. The woman in the film goes to Salt Lake City to work in a church as an organist. However, she keeps suddenly experiencing being cut off from reality, to the point nobody can see her. First time is in a big store where suddenly she can't manage to be noticed to get served. When a doctor tries to help it turns out she confesses to never having had a boyfriend or needing to share with other people. Also weird was a reference by the doctor to prosopagnosia when he tries to explain imagination can be deceptive. "Have you ever walked up to someone to say 'hello' only to find it was not the person you imagined to be?" This film made such an impact on me I searched on google to try and find any connection between the scriptwriter and either Aspergers or just psychology. I found zilch. The scriptwriter was a guy called Harvey and had just sat down and wrote the film. Critics review it as a basic gothic, spooky movie but for me it describes my derealisation. Not only that but the female protagonist is an organist who survived a drowning accident. Today I'm a pretty decent synth player but I started on an organ years ago and also barely survived a drowning accident aged about 10. In many ways it's like the number 9 that somehow was connected to John Lennon in a way John felt was very real to him (you can find it on Google). Anyway if nothing else, Carnival Of Souls is on YouTube and a real classic cult movie.
  21. 1 point
    We can simplify AS a bit by going back to the thirties. The Nazi Party were definitely experimenting with eugenics with plans to eliminate defective children. Asperger was to study highly problematic groups of children and nobody really knows whether he genuinely wished to cover for them. What he did was simple: join up the dots. What symptoms did they have in common? Clumsiness, repetitive behaviour, stims and so on. Asperger did not distinguish HFA as a distinct diagnosis as in delays in speech. The problem for me at present is modern psychology because I keep noticing major differences of opinion. For example a lot of people think AS is not actually autism. You may be asked about delays in speech. However, generally I think AS is not difficult to diagnose but much harder to understand. To diagnose roughly an AS person will stuggle to understand non spoken language. Sarcasm may be seen as flattery. The person may not be aware of boring someone. AS people stim or rock. They may not connect with the emotions shared by others at a given moment. Empathy so to speak. Dyspraxia is common or simply poor co-ordination. Sensitivity to sound and fabrics are common. Special interests, yes. Meltdowns, yes. Bottled up anger is often not mentioned.Given AS people are not aggressive, people will take advantage and exclude the individual. For anyone this is stressful. As time passes the anger builds up and up. It may then explode in huge meltdowns.
  22. 1 point
    I would certainly question the idea that AS is seen as a "cool" condition in the wider population. There may be small sections of society who - as Nichii suggested - somehow equate AS with being "eccentric" or "quirky" but far more commonly it is seen as some sort of problem. Most people still have little idea what AS is or - if they think they know - see it in a negative way. For example individuals with AS may be seen as "difficult", "unreliable", "not team players", "weird", etc. Sometimes they are viewed as incapable and people to be pitied. I don't deny there are some more supportive attitudes out there but they remain few and far between. If AS were truly seen as "cool" or even just an alternative, highly valid personality type then there would be no need for many people on the spectrum to cover up their condition. Unfortunately many with AS have to keep their condition secret, or only reveal it to those they can trust to be supportive. Many stereotypes about AS do persist, e.g. the brilliant but socially inept scientist, computer expert or savant. Those with AS range very widely in academic ability and their success or otherwise in many activities and relationships. Many conditions are comorbid including dyspraxia but not essential parts of AS. Some Aspies struggle with the most basic practical tasks while others have no difficulty. Some have dreadful problems with depression and anxiety while others lead happy, apparently stress-free lives. There are so many different experiences with AS but unfortunately too few of us are truly accepted by others and we have to play by the rules of the neurotypical majority whether we want to or not.
  23. 1 point
    Wer spricht hier Deutsch? Wer lernt Deutsch?
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    I never before mentioned I got into D/S about the same time Madonna made her Body Of Evidence movie and published her book. I am no longer into D/S but I have no issue over it - it was just a phase. I need to point out proper D/S is not in any way dirty or sick. When I was on a newslist years ago, it was all very normal people, teachers, office workers or married couples. So, what is D/S? It is simply role-play that makes vanilla sex seem a bit boring and routine. You act out a fantasy and you use costumes to play out a chosen scenario. Mine was the unruly student meets Headmistress role-play and it was all very convincing so you had a safety password to turn off the game if it felt too intense. For people on the spectrum D/S may allow you to confront your fears through staged control. There are lots of very normal and artistic people into D/S and I met dominatrixes who were terrific actresses. I got to know one American Domme who told me she learned so much from convent school and the nuns. Back then we used the term "Domme" to signify a dominatrix. Sadly today the artistic and erotic theatre of D/S has been swallowed up by crude porn except maybe in Japan where erotic writing is still going strong. Oh, and yes I have role played but these days just grew out of it and tend to have outgrown D/S.
  26. 1 point
    Well when I said 120db, I meant that nowhere could ever legally go above it, but I guess nightclubs and rock concerts would be the only places permitted to go that high, not retail outlets. Some factories maybe, though one would wear ear defenders, probably by law. At work, I was to sit next to someone in a band and he had developed tinnitus as a result. Really makes me wonder why people insist on listen to such deafening music.
  27. 1 point
    It's possible one session may be enough - some cases may be very straightforward. Certainly the man they saw - Simon Baron-Cohen - is a world-renowned expert on autism and could probably draw conclusions more quickly than others who might be consulted. Of course most individuals seeking a diagnosis are not fortunate enough to see someone of his expertise or - if they do see someone very eminent - it will be after a long period of waiting and maybe earlier consultations with others. We also hear on this forum and elsewhere of individuals who have to attend numerous meetings, have to undergo numerous tests, have testimony from relatives and others who know them and so on. There seems to be great variation in the diagnosis process but overall - for most people - it is long, difficult and (potentially) expensive. It certainly needs to be made quicker and less difficult so people can get the answers and support they need.
  28. 1 point
    These things will never be perfect, but I think this could actually lead the way towards more informative ones maybe as part of a series. I liked the 2 young female presenters and found them to be very raw and genuine. I liked that females were featured more than ever, and the dating part where the NT men couldn't tell their dates were Autistic, plus the sandwich order test.
  29. 1 point
    I don't use public transportation, but I definitely relate to this. Especially when that guy accidentally bumps into her, and she's closed in by all of those people. That's how I feel when I'm in a crowded store, and I'd like to escape, but I still need to get some stuff. Plus, since I work as a substitute teacher, unexpected changes happen all the time. It sucks, really .
  30. 1 point
    I like how Autistic women are being better represented in this years Autism Awareness week.
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    Have a great weekend everybody 😊
  33. 1 point
    My social contacts have always been pretty limited but in the past couple of years or so they've virtually disappeared altogether as I've been working for myself from home. I've had few friends in life - in education or work some people became acquaintances that I got on well with but very few of these relationships moved into friendship or if they did they soon ended after moving on. Although I would have liked more social contacts I can't say it's bothered me too greatly - this I think is they key difference between someone with AS who is quite comfortable with solitude and a neurotypical person who would find it extremely difficult. What I have found during this more recent period of virtual social isolation is the very few times I do go to see people it becomes a huge event and I become quite anxious in anticipation. Meeting up becomes a disruption to my heavily routinised life. Part of me would rather just stay at home although I do enjoy the meeting when it takes place.I suppose this is one of the drawbacks of having a limited social life is it can make any meeting hard-going but the more one withdraws the harder it can become. Before meeting I can't help thinking a huge amount about what I might say - not that there's anything crucial to be discussed it's just i have a "busy mind". This is probably the first place I've discussed this limited social life. It's not something I've discussed with friends or family. In part this is because it doesn't trouble me greatly but I am also aware that unfortunately there is still a social stigma about having few social contacts. Too many people think that people who have few contacts are "loners" who are either "bad" ("there must be something wrong with them") or "sad" - someone to be pitied and "helped". The reality is more mundane - I and many others who aren't very social are people who can often get on quite satisfactorily with people but who can't cross the bridge towards friendship or just prefer to keep a low profile and their own company. It's ironic but probably the only people who know how limited my social life is are my neighbours whom I rarely speak to. This may be different to some people who do discuss it with friends, family or others. My neighbours will know that I rarely leave the house and no-one ever visits while the other people I know won't have this more direct information although they might guess that I lead a largely solitary existence. It is still possible to be quite social in other ways by phone or online socialising but I rarely do those things either. Aside from neighbours the only others who would have a good idea of this isolation would be the phone companies who might notice that I make and receive almost no calls although I suppose some people rarely use their landline but do use their mobile a lot and vice versa so that's not absolute proof. All things considered I am broadly content with this lifestyle although I've no doubt it seems "strange" to people off the spectrum. Perhaps people with AS are the cats of the human world - solitary beings but with a splendid individuality. Social contact isn't necessary for a successful and fulfilling life although it can certainly be useful. Over the past two or three years I have in particular had certain issues that have troubled me and keep going through my head. With more social contact I would have more distraction and perhaps people I could discuss these issues with. However even when I was more social i was always very private so maybe I wouldn't have raised them anyway. Social contact can also - as we all know - be a major cause as well as a reliever of stress. I would probably benefit from being more social but doubt I will ever be very social - and nor do I want to be. Thank you for reading - that post proved longer than I expected and concision is certainly not one of my strengths!
  34. 1 point
    As you point out, others have allegedly found you 'aggressive' when challenging people. The problem I find is I am either too direct, or not direct enough (due to worrying over being too direct). Happy mediums are either accidents, or hard won after mammoth preparations. It would not have gone well for you long term as your challenge would probably have resulted in them alienating you even more. Had you been able to 'comfortably' challenge you probably would. We can only do what we think is best at any given time - if you have processing delay sometimes the best thing to do is nothing. The job is a major part of your routine life and your financial security ... you can lose it with just a few words, so on balance, all things considered, you probably handled it well. You didn't feel able at that moment in time to correct their entrenched ignorance ... thats no crime. I guess you could have said well I know an autistic person who isn't like that, or called them wankers or retrospectively said any range of things I do tend to challenge wrongs at work but just end up ostracised for it. I'm currently suspended and being screwed from every angle for innocently challenging someone. Having declared aspergers on employment just seems to have made matters worse for myself ... and thats with a social care organisation who on paper are supposed to understand diversity. Regarding your ignorant colleagues (and everyone was ignorant at one time), I guess it would be interesting to find out the source of their information, but people do tend to laugh at / ridicule people appearing to be on a crusade if they are without backing. Life really hasn't progressed much from basic laws of the jungle ... Its a shame there is no awareness info (leaflets) on aspergers/asc which could be put in the info / tourism racks. The rail service is offering a public service. As such, staff should have some basic awareness training on disabilities and human diversity issues. I expect there is a head of training somewhere. Technically you witnessed 'ableism' (which is in Wikipedia, but not the forum spell check ). Technically its a breach of the Equalities Act 2010. I've found I can't fight wrongs alone without ending up destroyed. Whatever effort I put into exposing matters, there is countering my good intention, infinitely many times that effort put into dishonestly covering matters up and denial. I think there is probably a gap in the awareness market for activism in the form of coordinated direct action ... but that would possibly just reinforce their ignorant beliefs. Its one of those 'catch 22' situation, damned if you do and damned if you don't. I think if your diagnosis is public knowledge it would make it easier to challenge as it adds credibility ... but equally provides a target for power obsessed bullies. You are not humourless or oversensitive. Naturally it hit a nerve. It just looks like the company that day was less than ideal ... I guess you just need to pity their ill informed ignorance. It was a crap day, but better days come. In the interests of self preservation maybe yes ... as change is a slow process. I'm always told to leave things and that its not my place to say things ... but for myself its hard to keep quiet as matters gnaw away until I say it anyway. Whatever you did or didn't do was the right thing at that moment.
  35. 1 point
    It's fairly easy to make the connection between the names. I don't think it's a secret. https://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com/2013/06/24/i-am-aspienwoman-interview-series-maja-toudal/
  36. 1 point
    Hi everyone, I only found this forum yesterday and this is my first post. This is a topic of particular interest to me and I think my views on this topic are worth sharing so here I am. Most people who know me are aware that I have been struggling with anxiety and depression for a long time. This is something I have been speaking about since the beginning of the year. My struggles with depression and anxiety ultimately led me to consider that I may be on the autism spectrum and I have since been formally diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. Many people that I have spoken to have been extremely surprised to learn that I was suffering from depression and anxiety, and they have all been supportive and understanding. For the most part they have been quite willing to listen to what I have to say and many people have shared their own stories with me. When I received a positive diagnosis of AS I 'came out' fairly publicly. I shared the information on Facebook so now pretty much everyone who knows me, knows that I have Asperger's. I had told my employer almost immediately upon suspecting it. This was not as hard for me as it would be for many people as I work for a very supportive company, I have excellent managers and I had been keeping them up to date on my difficulties with depression and anxiety, so informing them when I began to suspect I had Asperger's was easy. None of this was decided on the spur of the moment mind you. I spent a great deal of time deciding exactly how I was going to disclose this information and what I was going to say. I thought about disclosing just to my work, family and closest friends. I thought about all the potential ramifications of those decisions too. Even though my decision to disclose to my employer was an easy one I made sure to research the legalities of that decision so I knew my rights and responsibilities as well as those of my employer (I would urge anyone else in that situation to do the same). The decision to disclose over Facebook was something I thought about for months and I had decided that if I received a diagnosis of HFA or AS that I would disclose on Facebook within a few days of receiving said diagnosis. I know that not everyone on the spectrum would have the luxury of being able to disclose this information so publicly. I am very lucky to work for the company that I do, and I think that for many people on the spectrum concerns about employment and potential future employment might stop them. I felt that because I did not have to fear losing my job I should not fear disclosing this information to anyone. I also feel that as someone who is on the spectrum and who has finished a degree at university and held down a job almost continuously throughout my adult life, that my story is worth sharing and that I should share, because like Taylor Lee I would like to help people. Another decision that I made prior to my diagnosis was that I would advocate for awareness and acceptance of autism in any way I can. This decision combined with my employment situation largely informed my decision about disclosure. I hope that by sharing my story publicly I can continue the good work done by many other autistic individuals to remove some of the stigma that surrounds the words autism and Asperger's and to help as many people with those conditions as possible. To this end I have started a YouTube channel where I will share stories about strategies I have developed to cope with the difficulties I face day to day and how I have been successful at university and in finding and retaining gainful employment (link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3IE771K5kJE0K9quWp3HbQ) So that's my story. A bit long winded but I had a lot to say. I hope this helps you with your decision Taylor Lee
  37. 1 point
    I'm not a particularly social person, not at all. I even deleted my Facebook a few years ago and only recently made a new one where I have a whopping total of 23 friends. I've this one friend who should be the poster child for extroversion – she will strike up a conversation with anyone anytime – and I just imagine how tedious it must be to have that particular personality trait. I'm a classic case introvert. I can strike up and hold a conversation with people, especially in small groups of 2-4, and I enjoy talking to them about topics that interest me, but I don't really seek out people's company that much and after a social encounter I have to go recharge my batteries. I think I've always been this way. I had friends as a kid, but I wasn't one for initiating contact and was perfectly content playing by myself. I don't think I even demanded that much attention from my parents, I was always just off in my own little world drawing or playing with my toys. There's this one home video where my mum stood in the doorway to my room for quite a long time while I played with my Legos and I didn't even notice she was there. I think mostly the other kids came around to ask if I wanted to come out and play, not the other way around. As an adult, well. I don't go to social events at my university. I hardly ever go to parties and when I do I don't stick around for very long. There was a time where I'd go out on the weekends quite regularly – I hardly do anymore – but I always stay away from the dance floor. I prefer finding a dark corner where I can sit and nurse my beer and chat to random strangers about politics or whatever. I'm the guy that would rather go drink on a Tuesday because then the bars aren't crowded and I can make good conversation with a couple of friends – provided the music isn't too loud. I hate those places. My girlfriend and I do invite people over to play cards or board games quite regularly though. Usually it's just a couple of people, but on occasion we might have around 12 people over at once. The more people the are the faster I tire and if the game drags on for too long I get down right cranky. Most of the people that come over are folks that were my girlfriend's friends first and mine as a result of our relationship and then I don't feel bad if I just retreat into the bedroom and leave them to their socializing. I'll admit that sometimes I wish I was a little bit more socially inclined. It can get a little bit lonely from time to time and it can feel like I don't have enough friends or acquaintances. I guess I wish there were more low maintenance people in my life. Friendship is a two way street and I just get really bored of keeping up appearances really quickly, so it can be tough to maintain genuine friendships when I can just 'fall off the earth' it seems at any given time and not make any contact for a few months.
  38. 1 point
    First and foremost let me say that this post is in no way meant to diminish Willow's wonderful card, I have one of those as well as this one and it is Willows one that I would voluntarily show to someone unofficial i.e. a shopkeeper. However in the even that you are questioned by the police or something this official card might be useful... there is one for Scotland too and some English counties also have them but as I am not from those places I don't have all the links... feel free to add them if you do and perhaps if we can get a complete list together then some nice admin can amend the title and pin it but as I only have the welsh links at the moment I have put it in the title to save people looking in here and being disappointed. So this is the site: http://www.asdinfowales.co.uk/home.php?page_id=6406 It has a download link for a Word Document for your appropriate region: Dyfed, Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales. If you don't have Word you can download a free program called Open Office here: http://www.openoffice.org/download/ They don't require any evidence of your condition it is just a simple form asking for your name, date of birth, address, contact information, in case of emergency contact, and there is room for you to add any relevant information like associated conditions. The card itself is the size of a credit card but not quite the same quality although it is very sturdy (Willow's is definitely better quality though), one side is in English the other Welsh (Cymraig). Here are Scan's of my card so you can see what it says/looks like: English: Welsh/Cymraig:
  39. 1 point
    Several times, that sounds bad doesn't it... it isn't really though some are even a bit funny... When I was 19 I had a knife on me... not like a bad knife or anything just a small folding one, I had been camping with a friend and gone straight to work then I had gone out with some work mates after work and we ended up going into a club (I hate clubs but I occasionally get dragged along). Anyway obviously the bouncer took the knife which I was fine with cause I didn't like need it or anything (I'm seriously not going to stab anyone) but when I left they refused to give it back (they also took some of my medicine from the doctor that they wouldn't give back). I argued about it for a while not aggressively or anything I was being reasonable but I wanted my stuff back now that I was leaving the club and they refused so I phoned the police and told them they were stealing. I went home and a few weeks later I went to the police station to collect my stuff and I was put under arrest. I explained why I had the knife on me how I had been camping then gone straight to work then out and how I was fine about them not letting me take it in the club but I wanted it back when I left to go home, turns out that it is illegal to carry that kind of knife without a good reason (cause you had to like release it to fold it closed, everything else was fine it was under the 3 inches etc I thought it was just a penknife but you can carry this knife if you are going camping or fishing)... I was questions and I had to sign a statement but I wasn't charged (I'm still not sure if I was given a formal warning I may have been) but they did give it back after I explained. They even told me to carry a different kind of knife lol, I don't usually carry one at all but I do usually take one walking or whatever cause you never know it might be really imoportant! Next time I was in my early 20's and I saw 5 or 6 girls kicking the hell out of one girl on the floor which I thought was wrong I mean this girl wasn't fighting back or anything and she was already pretty badly hurt so even if there was a genuine reason like she started the fight or something I mean clearly it was time to stop so I kind of stepped in and said "OK I think you have made your point now" they all stepped back and this poor girl kind of latched onto me so I took her into a chip shop that was well lit and empty to try and calm her down, she was clearly very distraught (understandably) but she just kept yelling at me and biting me and stuff and I have to admit after a few minutes of calmly trying to reason with her I wasn't coping very well with her yelling and biting, the yelling mostly it was a small shop and it was really loud and bothering me, so I kind of hit her off me and walked out, but I had to give a full statement to the police when they arrived I wasn't arrested or anything though. Just goes to show I guess that you shouldn't always help people but I think I did the right thing trying to help even if it didn't work out? Some time around then (also in my early 20's) I was at home in my ground floor flat in the middle of a city when I heard and felt this really big bang/reverberation... it like shook the building so I went outside and a big black taxi had driven through he shop window next door and was literally parked inside the building. I had to give a statement but they waited 6 months before they asked me for it so I didn't really remember faces and stuff by then. A few years ago I was driving late at night and some drunk lads (it was a Friday or Saturday night) were running into the road on a 60 mph section of A road near where I now live and it is a really dark section with no street lights and they were throwing things at oncoming cars. I stopped at a petrol station not far from there and I phoned the police to report it not cause I wanted them to get into trouble but because I was really worried that a car might swerve the wrong way or even be coming the other way and not see them and seriously hurt them if not kill someone not to mention that the car might swerve and have an accident without involving them. But instead of what I expected you know a few stern words and a lift safely home, the police arrested them and made them spend the night in the cells, it turns out the lads were ripping out the cats eye units from the middle of the road and throwing those at cars, although they weren't charged (cause I couldn't identify them) I did have to give a statement. Just 2 years ago I was at my mums house and there was a big commotion in the lane at the back of her house and she went out to see what was happening and I followed her cause I was kind of worried for her and the police were at the top of the lane trying to disperse a crowd of school kids (it was quite late at night) one of them saw me in his flash light and he called me over, he kept the really bright flash light in my face too which I hate cause they are so bright and they essentially blind you to anything behind the light, but I went up and I was trying to explain that my mum lives there and he clearly didn't believe me... he thought I was one of the bloody school kids (I was 30 at the time!) I had to call my mum over to vouch for me and I had to show him my driving licence to prove I wasn't a wayward teen before he let me go back inside! Then just a few weeks ago I was at my boyfriends house and I had gone outside to have a cigarette at the back of his house and I could hear this girl crying and really upset telling someone else about how some boys had sexually assaulted her so I went out the front to find out what happened and she was just 14 years old, I phoned her mum and got her back home safe and her mum obviously took her to the hospital and got the police involved and again I had to give a statement, but the girl refused to cooperate, I don't really blame her she was in school with 2 of the 3 boys and I now live in a remote part of Wales and I can imagine the kind of hell it would be to go through that kind of thing when you are just 14. And that doesn't even count the times I have been pulled over in my car for driving around late at night (anyone would think it is a crime to drive), or even just walking my dog late at night! So yeah you could say I have had a few encounters with the police over the years although you can probably put most of it down to me having spent most of my time living in the middle of a student city. That is ridiculous as if you would phone emergency services if you had illegal substances on you! That's quite OK it's good to reiterate it anyway but I wasn't sure if you were telling me off
  40. 1 point
    Oh I missed some (that will teach me for copying and pasting) Social/Relationships: Perceived to be cold-natured and self-centered; unfriendly People definitely perceive me as cold I am very logical and I don't always respond with any emotions or the appropriate emotion. I'm not self-centered and have never been accused of it. I am unfriendly, I tend to keep people at a distance in real life, I am easily frustrated by others and I don't have much patience, I can also say things (like a statement of fact) that is taken as rudeness. Can be very shy or mute Yes although I am adept at hiding my shyness behind a mask. Definitely go mute when I am worried or anxious.
  41. 1 point
    Appearannce/Personal Habits: Dresses comfortably due to sensory issues and practicality Yep – jeans or combats and a t-shirt sometimes with a hoody. Will not spend much time on grooming and hair. Hairstyles usually have to be ‘wash and wear’. Can be quite happy not grooming at all at times Yep, wash and wear pretty much sums it up. Only wear make-up if I am going to a ‘social event’ I can’t get out of it is kind of a mask. Eccentric personality; may be reflected in appearance Yeah I’m pretty eccentric. Is youthful for her age, in looks, dress, behaviour and tastes I actually still get asked for ID regularly even though I am 32 although I never associated this with AS. I guess I have always dressed this way and I still like the things I have always liked but I don’t know that they are especially youthful pursuits. Usually a little more expressive in face and gesture than male counterparts Yeah I guess I am quite expressive although from others comments on this I don’t think it in any way portrays what I am thinking/feeling. May have many androgynous traits despite an outwardly feminine appearance. Thinks of herself as half male/half female Umm no I think of myself as a complete tom boy in every way except my outwardly feminine appearance. May not have a strong sense of identity, and can be very chameleon–like I would definitely say I am chameleon-like I usually think of it as a cut stone a different facet for different situations. Enjoys reading and films as a retreat, often sci-fi, fantasy, children’s, can have favourites which are a refuge I use reading (primarily Fantasy) to escape but my other escapism is games. Uses control as a stress management technique: rules, discipline, rigid in certain habits, which will contradict her seeming unconventionality I’m definitely very OCD, perhaps even controlling but only about myself/my environment. Usually happiest at home or in other controlled environment Absolutely. My house or my boyfriend’s house, and my car don’t know why but I love my car it is a refuge and an escape route. Intellectual/Giftedness/Education/Vocation: May have been diagnosed as autistic when young, or may have been thought of as gifted, shy, sensitive etc... May also have had obvious or severe learning deficits Hmm this is an odd one, I was born in Wales and my first language was Welsh I wasn't taught to read or write English at all and so I was self-taught in reading English but I think that is an unusual situation. As for gifted I was given an IQ test when I was about 5 and scored very high which meant MENSA wanted me to attend their school but I didn't go and although I excelled at some subjects I was terrible at ones I disliked or found boring and I would be very surprised if this wasn't the same experience most HFA/AS have. Often musical and/or artistic Not really, I like music but I don’t have any talent for it although I do play drums I think that isn't quite what this means, and I am not very artistic, my talents are more math/science/logic based. May have a savant or strong talent(s) I don’t think savant is the right word at all but I do have some strong talents (doesn't everyone?) I also have a freaky memory which I have always assumed was AS related. May have strong interest in computers, games, science, graphic design, inventing, things of technological and visual nature. More verbal thinkers may gravitate to writing, languages, cultural studies and psychology Extremely strong interest in Computers, Games, Science and Making things (inventing isn't the right word for me… I often think of new things to solve problems but never actually proceed to making them but I like to build stuff like radio’s or orrery’s). May be a self-taught reader, been hyperlexic as a child, and will possess a wide variety of other self-taught skills Opps see above regarding reading… I did teach myself a lot of programming languages and stuff though. May be highly educated but will have had to struggle with social aspects of college. May have one or partial degrees I struggle with any formal education, I never progress far enough to be challenged so I have given up trying on that front. Can be very passionate about a course of study or job, and then change direction or go completely cold on it very quickly Yeah, I almost fall in love with a new job but it wears off in about 6 months and it’s all downhill from then on. Will often have trouble holding onto a job and may find employment daunting Indeed Highly intelligent, yet sometimes can be slow to comprehend due to sensory and cognitive processing issues Yeah sometimes I seem to be coming in from a different angle to whoever I am listening to. Will not do well with verbal instruction - needs to write down or draw diagram I certainly prefer to have things written down. Will have obsessions but they are not as unusual as her male counterparts (less likely to be a trainspotter) Umm I’m not really sure about this… I definitely have obsessions, lots of them but I am not sure they are ‘usual’ my long-standing obsessions are Stones/Rocks, Dragons, Computers & Fantasy Emotional/Physical: Emotionally immature and emotionally sensitive I don’t really understand what this means so I can’t answer. Anxiety and fear are predominant emotions I definitely suffer from anxiety but I am not sure about fear. More open to talking about feelings and emotional issues than males with AS Absolutely not! I am completely uncomfortable talking about that stuff. Strong sensory issues – sounds, sights, smells, touch, and prone to overload (less likely to have taste/food texture issues as males) I don’t like loud noise or bright light, I loath being touched and I am hyper sensitive about being watched, I hate being in cramped crowded places where there are people all around. I’m not aware of any issues with smell or taste but I don’t like some food textures although I always assumed that was just personal preference rather than being an AS thing. Moody and prone to bouts of depression. May have been diagnosed as bi-polar or manic depressive (common comorbid diagnosis’ of AS/autism) while the AS diagnosis was missed Others always describe me as moody although I don’t see it that way, definitely get very bad bouts of depression. Probably given several different prescriptions to treat symptoms. Will be very sensitive to medications and anything else she puts in her body so may have had adverse reactions I’m not really sure what ‘sensitive to medications’ means I take medicine cause I am better when I take it than when I don’t but most med’s don’t seem to work on me like they do on other people again I never associated this with AS I just figured I have a weird metabolism or an over active liver :S 9 out of 10 have mild to severe Gastro-intestinal difficulties e.g. ulcers, acid reflux, IBS ect. Huh! Yes, however again I had NO IDEA this was linked in anyway to AS! This is turning into a most informative process! Stims to soothe when sad or agitated: rocking, face-rubbing, humming, finger flicking, leg bouncing, finger or foot-tapping Aye. I rock mostly when I am in pain but also if I am very agitated, I ‘jig’ my legs (leg-bouncing) and I flick my fingers. I also bite my lips… no idea if this is common. Similarly physical when happy, hand flapping, clapping, jumping, singing, running around, dancing, bouncing Yes but less so… I jump or bounce when I am happy or excited but I am not usually happy or excited so this isn't common with me. Prone to temper or crying meltdowns, even in public, sometimes over seemingly small things due to sensory or emotional overload My initial response to this is NO! I am very uncomfortable with any emotional expression in public however when I got to one of my lowest points I was breaking down into tears in public… I found this absolutely humiliating and I basically wanted to run away and never return. As for temper I think I have pretty good control of my temper most of the time (see below). Hates injustice and hates to be misunderstood, this can incite anger and rage I do obviously hate injustice (don’t most people?) I suppose I get frustrated and impatient when misunderstood but I would say that although I can and occasionally do get angry or enraged it takes a lot to get me that riled. Prone to mutism when stressed or upset, especially after a meltdown. Less likely to stutter than male counterparts but may have raspy voice, monotone at times, when stressed or sad Definitely prone to being mute when I am stressed or upset, I king of pull in and think stuff through until I can deal with it. I do get a really raspy voice but again I have never associated it with AS I always assumed it was a sore throat or if I have talked a lot (since I don’t usually do that). Social/Relationships: Word and actions are often misunderstood by others Yeah Is very outspoken at times, may get very fired up when talking about passions/obsessive interests Yeah Like her male counterpart, will shut down in social situations once overloaded, but is generally better at socializing in small doses. May even give the appearance of ‘skilled’, but it is a ‘performance’ Yep Doesn’t go out much. Will prefer to go out with partner only or children if she has them No kids and not planning on any. I don’t like going out at all, I will when I have to if it is something I have to attend I usually prefer going alone since if someone goes with me they will make conversation and try to make me feel better when to be honest I just want to be left alone. When I do go out socially and it is very rare I tend to prefer just meeting/going with one person but I can do groups if I have to but I definitely pull out one of my other facets (see above) for that. Will not have many girlfriends and will not do ‘girly’ things like shopping with them or have get-togethers to ‘hang out’ I don’t have any female friends, I don’t like girly things… just not my thing. As for Shopping I consider it a chore just like housework… another drudgery to be endured (in fact I probably prefer housework). I never ‘hang-out’ I don’t understand the point of it. Will have a close friend or friends in school, but not once adulthood is reached I did have close friends into my adulthood but I am pretty much a complete recluse these days and I mainly interact online. May or may not want to have a relationship. If she is in a relationship, she probably takes it very seriously but she may choose to remain celibate or alone I never did want to have a relationship I have managed to find myself in them on occasion however, to be honest I quite like being single however my current relationship is now in its eighth year and we are still happy although I have to say that is mainly down to his patience, lack of neediness and easy going nature (and for the record he doesn't have any Autism Spectrum Disorder that I know of). Due to sensory issues, will either really enjoy sex or strongly dislike it Yep If she likes a male, she can be extremely, noticeably awkward in her attempts to let him know, e.g. she may stare when she sees him or call him repeatedly. This is because she fixates and doesn’t understand societal gender roles. This will change with maturity Not really sure about this, I don’t ever remember making an idiot of myself over a bloke but then I was pretty mature (17) when I decided I liked guys at all until then I was pretty much uninterested in anything that added complications to life. To be honest my problems in this department is usually being oblivious when someone likes me. Often prefers the company of animals, but not always due to sensory issues Absolutely but again I never associated this with AS. EDIT: Hopefully I have fixed the icky layout
  42. 0 points
    Note that the eugenics was more widely accepted at that time than today, and it was primarily among the left. Also, did Hans Asperger actually support it for a substantial portion of his life? Did he still support it by the time he identified the syndrome named after him? Surely his contribution to medical research is way more significant than his sending children we consider innocent to be detained, etc.
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