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      Welcome to the forum!   09/17/2017

      Please come in from the rain and sit by the fire! We're happy you found us and hope you will feel at home here.  

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    RiRi

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/17/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    No, I don't think this is true. If school had gone so well for them, it is unlikely that they would be diagnosed with an ASD. Having significant difficulty with one's environment, at school, in the family and in the workplace later in life, is a key part of their diagnosis. One doesn't get a diagnosis for school to have gone smoothly. Some might have had good academic results, but all going through mainstream schooling will have had some significant social difficulties, that is the definition of the diagnosis. You studied at university. I don't think that you could have done all that badly academically at school, otherwise you wouldn't have been accepted and gone to university.
  2. 3 points
    I am good at math, I know I don't have dyscalculia which I have always understood to be a numerical form of dyslexia, so instead of struggling with letters, words and language you struggle with numbers and math. I did the test to give you a point of comparison, my results are below: Pass - 4 minutes - You scored well and the time taken suggests that your skills are fluent. Unless you have serious concerns that your mathematical skills are significantly lower than other skills, you have no need for a diagnostic assessment of your number skills. I will admit I was also watching something while I did the test so I probably could have done it faster, I got one answer 'incorrect' although that isn't really right since the question was 'Do you have difficulty managing money?' and that issue is as a result of ADHD
  3. 3 points
    The type of Christmas you outline is probably quite common among people with AS - certainly those who live alone. There is a lot of pressure to be social at Christmas and this can lead those who lead a more solitary life to feel left out or anxious. However Aspies probably do cope much better with a low-key Christmas than neurotypicals as they are more comfortable in their own company and routines. I think it's important that people observe Christmas in whatever way they wish - if someone really enjoys lots of socialising, present-giving and partying that's fine but if another person wants to treat it as an ordinary day that's fine as well. The worst thing is enforced socialising and jollity. that can be particularly painful for someone with AS but it can also be hard for many neurotypicals. We can end up with the irony at Christmas of two people seeing each other, or giving each other presents and cards, when neither wants to but feel they must because "it's the done thing" - and even though they dislike the ritual each would be offended if the other didn't take part! None of this is to knock the genuine pleasure many people get at Christmas but it should be the one time of year when we get to do what we want, not be forced to do what others want. As regards your Christmas card total that again is probably not unusual. A lot of people send cards as a sort of empty ritual. Not getting cards doesn't imply being disliked or being forgotten. As you suggest it may reflect not being particularly involved in socialising but someone can still be well-regarded nonetheless. While all this socialising can be satisfying it comes at a price - literally as well as metaphorically - and that is more true at Christmas than at any other time. A "quiet Christmas" doing what you want to do, when you want to do it, has its attractions.
  4. 2 points
    I got the risk of dyscaliculia too . I spend 5 minutes and 23 seconds on it.
  5. 2 points
    I think thats ignorant, dangerous and probably ableist rubbish ... and certainly not related to my experience. School was a solitary nightmare where it was impossible to fit into anything, which naturally impacted an ability to learn whilst almost completely shut down. I left a year before I was legally supposed to and the last 6 years of school were certainly very damaging. Granted I was schooled in the corporal punishment era where peoples differences were not accommodated and physical and mental abuse was very common ... school running smoothly? certainly not ...
  6. 2 points
    Please don't think I am being difficult or obtuse but the difference is kind of in the question... it's functionality. The higher functioning you are ... literally the more you can function (by NT standards). The lower functioning you are... the less you are able to function. This means that you can adapt more and learn more at the higher functioning end of the spectrum, it isn't just that you are better able to 'fit in' but also that you are better able to grasp things, learn things, adapt to new situations and generally cope better with the challenges of modern life/living. P.S. Welcome back
  7. 2 points
    I was always very good at maths (and physics which includes some math) at school, also when I went to Uni I studied Electrical Engineering (although I dropped out) which also has a fair amount of math, I don't think you necessarily have to be good at math to be a geek though and certainly not to be a tech although it can help with coding I certainly never feared numbers/figures... I quite like the fact matht is predictable and follows rules, I would think most people with AS would feel that way.
  8. 2 points
    I liked Maths at school and am one those AS people who is fascinated by numbers, especially statistics. I can do calendrical calculation but not to the extent of savants. However my skills at Maths have never been exceptional and I found Pure Maths much more difficult than Statistics. As regards teaching and learning I'm not someone who is adept learning a subject by myself unless I already have some prior knowledge; even then some input from a teacher is useful to clarify misunderstandings and get over any hurdles.
  9. 2 points
    I know because I have a different way of thinking than most people. I constantly want to know what will happen next (I don't like the unknown). I constantly want to know how things work, everywhere I go. I overanalyze situations. Some situations I could think of for a while, years even. I store a lot of information in my brain. That's what I have for now.
  10. 2 points
    We all have to restrain ourselves regarding inner impulses ... but as you said The simplistic solution is don't stay in your room too long and get bored ... a goal of forgiving and liking yourself might be productive ... and a goal of rewarding activity / utilising relaxation times. All easier said than done but we need direction ...
  11. 2 points
    This forum has a mainly U.K base, and at least three of our active members (@Miss Chief , @Echo and @Angry Primeape) are from Wales. I don't know if any of them are native Welsh speakers but I would like to introduce people to Welsh. It is Britain's second most widely spoken language and is also spoken in a remote part of Argentina called Patagonia. I'd like to start with a list of words that are the same in Welsh as in English.
  12. 2 points
    Merry Christmas to all of you !!
  13. 2 points
    Cwtch is pronounced; Coo - like a pigeon noise, Tch - like itch without the i The Welsh alphabet has 29 letters and includes extra vowels so W and Y are vowels, it also has 8 digraphs (double letters) and it has accents used on vowels; acute accent ( ´ ), grave accent ( ` ), circumflex ( ˆ ) and diaeresis ( ¨ ) but accented letters are not regarded as a separate part of the alphabet it just effects how you pronounce the vowel; long, short, hard, soft etc. I mention the above because the one thing most people ask about pronouncing is the double LL digraph and while this doesn't sound anything like an English sound this is how I explain it: put your mouth and tongue in the shape/position you would if you were going to say the letter L (hard as in Laugh) then instead of making the sound for L (keeping you mouth in that position) instead make the sound for the letter C (hard as in Cough) and the noise that comes out of your mouth will be the right sound for the LL in Welsh Consonant letters are almost always hard in Welsh, so the letter B is said Buh and never Bee C is Cuh and never Cee and so on through the consonants. Here is the Welsh alphabet... A, E, I, O, U, W & Y are vowels. I'm not going to go into ALL the ways you can pronounce vowels, it depends on the accent used as well as what letters come before the vowel. Speaking of which there are also mutations in Welsh: And of course we have masculine and feminine forms too, so that can effect stuff. I've probably put everyone off now
  14. 2 points
    I don't think there are Welsh words that are the same as English words, there are some words that don't exist in Welsh and so we use English words instead, this is because Celtic languages (which Welsh is) are the oldest languages in Europe and obviously there are modern words that didn't exist when Welsh was evolving and we don't always create new ones so we just use the English word. There are some Welsh slang words that have made their way into English (mainly Northern England since some parts of the North still have links to Welsh) I think the term 'tara' which means goodbye comes from Welsh although I'm not 100%. The term 'cwtch' (which means to cuddle) seems to be used in northern England and that is definitely a Welsh word It's also worth knowing that there are differences between the North Wales and South Wales languages, although you can get by in either if you speak one. I know @Echo is Welsh speaking but she is from North Wales so I assume she speak the Northern Welsh where as I am from the South. You can see some links between English and Welsh, if you speak both languages it's obvious that English came after Welsh since Welsh is structured a lot like 'old English' for example in modern English you would ask someone: 'Where are you from?' but Welsh would be closer to the old English of: 'From where do you come?' in South Wales this would be 'O ble dych chi'n dod?' I think there would be some slight differences in Northern Welsh but the translation into English would still be the same. So you can see the evolution of the language in English, whereas, Welsh has stayed the same. I was raised Welsh speaking but I moved to a city where it isn't spoken much when I was 10 so I lost a lot of the language but I still speak some and I'm working on getting back to speaking it more since I now live in an area where it's spoken a lot again. @Nesf I don't know if you have this already on the resources page but a Language Tree would be good I've also attached it here (a slightly shorter one since this topic is specifically about Welsh) so you can see that Celtic is the first branch on the Indo-European > European trunk and predates Germanic (which includes English), this means you can see a lot of Celtic influences in the groups that directly follow it (like Germanic/English). However, English has evolved a lot since then so you see the links more in old English (like Shakespeare). EDIT: I almost forgot, French also has huge Celtic influence even though it's a Romantic language because part of France spoke Brittany (a Celtic language very close to Welsh), so there is huge Celtic influence on French even though the Romantic languages evolved from Germanic, there are common words between Welsh and French, for example the Welsh word for 'window' is 'ffenestr' and the French word is 'fenêtre', the Welsh word for 'horse' is 'ceffyl' and the French word is 'cheval' and while they look quite different the pronunciation is very close.
  15. 2 points
    I agree Gone home. Privacy is important to people with AS - we need that space and independence. Even those who live with others value having more time to be alone and do what they feel comfortable with. You're right though that too much privacy and time to oneself has its drawbacks. The presence of other people - whether as visitors or living in the same home - can reduce the risk of drifting off in the wrong direction. I'm not talking about doing things that are "bad" but simply letting things slip and maybe becoming too remote from wider society. For example there are home improvements that I wish I'd got done over the years but the lack of visitors - let alone anyone staying for longer periods - meant I felt little impetus to get things done. Other people - even if they don't say anything directly - make us more aware of wider social standards. It's also the case that when others either drop by or live with us - friends or family - they can provide an important source of support, whether that be practical or psychological, and we don't have to struggle with things alone. All this is not to deny that other people in our homes can be a major source of stress and that in some cases their "interventions" are far more of a hindrance than a help. It's a case if getting the right kind of interaction in the home and elsewhere. We don't need much - but we do need some.
  16. 2 points
    I like privacy. Its the only way I can protect my vulnerabilities. Too much is not a good thing though.
  17. 2 points
    I hope this fits in here I don't know if it's considered Progressive rock, maybe more like Progressive Pop, however I think Kate Bush is very progressive in her approach to music. She was definitely not mainstream. And also, I am crazy about her music even though I've only listened to some of her records. Hounds of Love and The Kick Inside are personal favourites of mine. Her music and especially her voice really speaks to me.
  18. 2 points
    For a very long time I'd been aware that I was "different". I had limited social skills and an almost entirely solitary lifestyle. I had very unusual, intense interests. I had always had a very limited diet and a long list of anxieties and aversions. I found practical and spatial tasks such as learning to drive very difficult. I didn't really know what to make of all this until I heard a "Book of the Week" on the radio called "Born on a Blue Day" by Daniel Tammet. The book is about his life with AS and so many of the characteristics he mentioned (not his savant skills I should stress) seemed to apply to me. I then read other autobiographies of people with AS and very soon was certain I also had it. There may be some people who have no idea they have AS until they are diagnosed but I would say most will recognise the characteristics long beforehand. These characteristics come in different combinations but the number and strength of them usually leaves little doubt that someone is on the spectrum.
  19. 1 point
    I recall ages ago I had posted a pic of my dog on this site so I had a look in the archives just in case. Here is his photo probably taken 4 years ago.
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    Access is a database program from Microsoft in the Microsoft Office suite.
  22. 1 point
    Yes, I am good at computer and IT stuff/and SQL, and HTML with PHP programming. I am okay in math. Some of the questions I took random shots in the dark I got some of the right.
  23. 1 point
    @Catman2018 That's interesting. Truthfully, I don't know what dyscalculia entails. I've researched it before and what the person said resonated with me. Like having difficulty reading analog clocks. I do struggle with it, but I am able to read them. Also mental math, I suck at that. I couldn't do a problem in my head. If having dyscalculia basically means that a person isn't good at math, then I definitely have dyscalculia. I think I read somewhere that you're good with computer stuff/computer programming. Are you good at math?
  24. 1 point
    I took less than 11 minutes to complete it, but I put I would be guessing for a lot of them. :/ I got risk of dyscalculia. I took it a second time with 2 minutes to complete it, but I still got risk of dyscalculia. I took it a third time and still got risk of dyscalculia. I think I actually may have dyscalculia......
  25. 1 point
    I would agree with Nesf and Gone home that problems at school are sadly all too common for children with AS. It is true that these are most often to do with bullying and social relationships rather than academic but such problems can make school life a miserable experience. I must admit I was one of those who didn't have too many social problems at school although there were still signs related to AS such as social isolation and not forming friendships. I had very little self-awareness back then and this may have protected me from self-esteem issues which flared up badly in adulthood. Although AS students often do well academically their profile of abilities may still be uneven and that was certainly true for me. My performance in practical subjects such as Woodwork, Metalwork and Art was abysmal - partly due to lack of physical dexterity but also because my attitude towards such subjects was so negative and I switched off during them. I still resent the fact i was forced to do a practical subject at 'O' Level and predictably failed while I would very probably have passed another academic subject. Others with AS may also have struggled with practical subjects and many have talked of issues with P.E.. The school system has changed a lot. There is far more emphasis now on working in groups or pairs and this may disadvantage AS students - indeed difficulties with this kind of work may flag up the condition. Perhaps the more individual learning of the past helped those with AS. However schools are now far more aware about AS and much more prepared to offer support to students who are struggling in all sorts of ways. These two changes may work to cancel each other out but overall - now or in the past - school tends to be a tough time for those with AS.
  26. 1 point
    I certainly have a tendency for my accounts on almost any topic to be too long. Often the core ideas are quite concise but then the extra details and analysis flood out. While those extras are sometimes useful they can result in a much less effective piece of communication - communication involves judging what your specific "audience" needs to know and delivering it in the most accessible manner. This is certainly not about being superficial or "dumbing down" but giving people what they need to know for their purposes. We know from our own experience that it can be frustrating when someone gives a long-winded or overly-complex account when we need something more direct and specific to our needs. I can be concise when required and my accounts are generally better for this. I'm certainly aware of going into too much detail and benefit from greater brevity. However there can be an over-compensation where the account is too brief and doesn't provide the clearest explanation. I do try alternative explanations with different approaches and examples but these are often no better and can end up being confusing. All this comes back to the AS difficulty in judging what others are looking for. Accounts can end up being too complex, too basic, too long or too short. Explaining things is hard for anyone (harder than most realise) but harder for those with AS.
  27. 1 point
    I agree with @Nesf here: I think he isn't really conscious of the stimming and it just stops when he has to direct his attention or focus on something else. I also do this like @Nesf I also will stop talking suddenly if something requires my full attention... this tends to happen when I'm driving and it used to really amuse my driving instructor back when I was learning... we would be chatting and I would just stop mid sentence because something was happening up ahead and once it had passed or resolved itself I would start up again where I left off. Personally I think this is a good thing, it meant I was paying attention to what was going on around the car but he thought it was quite funny that I would just stop, pause, then start again. I'm the same with stims if something requires my full attention then I go still while I deal with that, then when I relax it comes back.
  28. 1 point
    I think that he stopped stimming because he was so focused on getting his speech out. That needed a lot of energy and concentration. The area of his brain that controls the stimming kind of turns off when he wants to speak. I do the same thing, when I'm hyperfocused on something, I don't stim. I also suddenly freeze and stop moving. My brain can't multi-task easily. Also, speaking creates a surge of emotion, or stimulation, and consequently the need to stim again. I once met a person who was lower functioning than Sam. She was mostly non-verbal, but had echolalia and would repeat back sentences she heard, but without seeming to understand what they meant. The only thing I ever heard her say that was coming from her and not something echoed back was "I'm hungry". I have no idea how aware she was of what was going on around her - actually, I think that she was aware, but didn't know what to do with it, or whether she understood what was being said to her, and if she did, she was unable to respond. She was very anxious and stimmed non-stop. I think that she was able to understand some things, if they were spoken slowly and clearly enough. She seemed to like or want to be around people and followed them around, could be left alone in the house for short periods only, could do some things on her own, but got confused over her timing - for example, brushing her teeth or taking a shower in the middle of the day, I think she had no or little sense of time.
  29. 1 point
    Having met well over 100 people on the Autism Spectrum, I can say that Sam is certainly a severe case. I have never met anyone with Aspergers who is so severe. I've certainly met some who appear like they have learning difficulties (and some have them too), although they still appear to function better than Sam does. So Sam will not have an Aspergers diagnosis, though may have a Classical Autism diagnosis. Its often surprising what some of the more severely Autistic people are able to do. There are of course the non-verbal ones. I don't know if anyone can say for sure that anyone with Autism is entirely unaware of the world. For instance, Carly Fleischmann can't speak at all, but communicates via an electronic device and is very articulate and even shows a sense of humour.
  30. 1 point
    Although it wasn't part of my courses at school and college I've long had a curiosity about Applied Maths (Mechanics). I did try learning it at home but couldn't get to grips with it at all. In part this may be because I don't have a background in Physics, Engineering or other technical subjects unlike most students of Applied Maths. I'm not a technically-minded person and my spatial skills are poor. Once Maths moves into solids and three dimensions I find it much more difficult. Given that many people with AS have weaker spatial skills this may apply to others but I'm aware that there are plenty of people on the spectrum who are very comfortable and skilled in spatial and technical areas. What we may tend to see is not that those with AS are overall less able in Maths than the wider population (indeed the opposite may be true) but that there is a much wider range in their abilities in Maths with some highly expert and others completely at a loss. Although it doesn't relate wholly to Maths I found those questions in aptitude tests about spotting which shape was the odd one out or next in a sequence very difficult and very frustrating. Sometimes I would get them right but only have studying them for a long time. Often I would just give up and guess. I was far more comfortable with the questions about numbers. In an ideal world I'd like to study Applied Maths (and Physics) with a teacher and I think it might overcome some of the difficulties I mentioned earlier. Sometimes even a little teaching can make a big difference if the core abilities and interest are there to be unlocked. The ideas of other students can also be helpful. As David mentioned teaching and classes don't work for everybody and those with AS may be more comfortable learning alone than others but I still feel they generally benefit from some teaching and sharing ideas with others.
  31. 1 point
    How well you function also depends on how far people are prepared to accommodate you., and how well they treat you. The person in the video, Sam, appears to have quite a few difficulties in functioning, but because his boss is prepared to accommodate him, he is able to work. Unfortunately, people usually aren't so accommodating...
  32. 1 point
    Well, it certainly isn't a savant skill for me. @Dr-David-Banner I do find your statement interesting that most people on the spectrum are at a disadvantage. I never really liked math because it was pretty much the subject I was worst at, but I wasn't that bad at it. I'm not very good with mental math (that's why I've thought I have dyscalculia), but if you give me a paper and pencil, I can work out a problem. I didn't like word problems, statistics was hard for me, but then again, every math was. Math wasn't something that came "natural" to me.
  33. 1 point
    When learning maths at school, I found that I was good at geometry, but hopeless at algebra. I'm now reading a theory that says that autistics have difficulty with tasks which require you to use both hemispheres of the brain simultaneously, and that sounds about right for me, as I have difficulty multitasking and it's no coincidence that the specific things I find difficult are the things that require good integration of the left and right hemispheres of the brain. I think that algebra requires both hemispheres -or two separate ares of the brain which don't have good connections - to solve problems, and that's why I find it so difficult.
  34. 1 point
    I don't think the headline does Chris Packham any favours as he seems merely to be saying that animals in general sometimes need to be euthanised - not that he thought it was unavoidable in this case. He also states in the article that animals in zoos can be seen as "animal ambassadors" and I suppose someone can be critical of zoos in general but still feel they have a role in educating the public about animals. It's true that on many issues there may appear to be inconsistencies or possible anomalies in people's views. e.g. someone who campaigns for animal welfare but eats meat or supports animal experimentation. Even among vegetarians and vegans there can be question marks about their views on certain animal issues. Sometimes the inconsistencies arise from lack of knowledge, sometimes changing on other issues seems too difficult for some people. I don't eat meat and am a big supporter of animal rights and welfare but I would far rather appreciate any steps someone can make to promoting the better treatment of animals than expect them to change on every issue. On this and many other issues there can be apparent inconsistencies in attitudes and behaviour - an entirely "pure" or consistent policy is rarely possible. Moving in the right direction is something to be applauded even if the ultimate destination may never be reached (and may not even be a desirable place.)
  35. 1 point
    It's only unreliable if conversion is done blindly. There are actual language courses based on these techniques. Yes, there are false friends, and that's when the meaning needs to be given.
  36. 1 point
    Yes, it's a way. But warning ! There are also fake friends. For example, "dramatic" means "spectacular" whereas the french word "dramatique" means "tragic".
  37. 1 point
    In french, it's "appétit" In France, we don't say "elevateur" but "ascenseur". One more thing. There are also "accents" like é, à, è...
  38. 1 point
  39. 1 point
    One word we have in English is 'avon' as a name of a few rivers. In Welsh, 'afon' (f pronounced as in 'of') is simply the general word for 'river.' In fact, it can mean 'a river'. If you look at the list above, you'll see the word for 'a head'. 'A white head' is 'pen gwyn' believed to be the source of the English word penguin, even though penguin heads are black as I'm sure we all know. 'The head' is 'y pen' and 'the river' is 'yr afon'. Another Welsh word we have in English is 'eisteddfod' the <dd> being the [dh] sound like in 'the'. In English it is the word for the Welsh festival of things like music and poetry. But in Welsh it apparently just means 'a session'. 'The session' would be 'yr eisteddfod'. Another feature Welsh shares with French is a thing called liason. In French, it's only a matter of pronouncing word-final consonants before words beginning with vowels, like a/an in English and indeed y/yr in Welsh, the latter meaning 'the'. In Wesh, this linking of words connected in meaning also affects initial consonants, causing mutations mentioned above. Going back to the word for 'session' it is a compound word. 'Eistedd' means 'sit' or 'to sit' and 'bod' means 'to be'. Note what happens to 'bod' when combined with 'eistedd'. These are the sort of words I mean. Regarding Northern English, the North Country counting jargon is an example, having something to do with Welsh numbers. Before we get to an example, here are the first four numbers in Welsh, and they can actually be related back to Latinate numbers we use in English: *Yn - This can be related back to 'uni' in English, as in uniform, unicycle, unicorn, etc. And indeed also to 'Uno' which means 'One' in Italian, for us it's the name of a card game. *Dau - prounced 'die', it can be related back to the Latin derived 'duo' in English. *Tri - Although Welsh has both [th] and [dh] (the latter written as <dd>) it sounds like the English word with [t] instead. And it is spelled like the tri- in worlds like triangle and tricyle, coming again from Latin. *Pedwar - We have Quadra in English in words like Quadralateral, Quadracep, etc. The <qu>/[kw] is a 'p' in Welsh, because Welsh is P-Celtic. If you've seen that country jargon, you will have seen 'pimp' for 'five'. It is pronounced the same in Welsh but written like the English word 'pump'. And that's how the <u> is generally pronounced in Welsh. The formal British pronunciation of <oo> as in 'food' is what is written as <w> in Welsh. While <w> can also be a consonant, as in names like 'Gwenth' and 'Gwernol', <y> is always a vowel in Welsh, pronounced as in 'Sydenham'.
  40. 1 point
    Assuming you were born with it, how would it make any difference to someone with Autism... they would never know the difference? I have Tritanopes specifically what is commonly called blue/green colour blindness; I confuse some blues with greys and some greens with blues. I do see more shades of some colours than others too. I knew I had this very young because I would get corrected frequently on what colour I said, If I said something was grey I would be told it was blue if I said something was blue I might be told it was green. But was born this way, I always have and always will see those colours the way I see them... how would this effect my AS?
  41. 1 point
    Hi too all my friends on asperclick i wish you a merry Christmas and happy holidays and merry Christmas to Willow and all the best in 2018 this will be my last post for a while and all the best in 2018 too everybody on the forum
  42. 1 point
    @Alex I highly recommend her 2005 album Aerial if you haven't heard it.
  43. 1 point
    I've just seen a very interesting short documentary on the Welsh language S4C channel about a young man with autism: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p033zb7q/sign/taith-fawr-y-dyn-bach-cyfres-2013-daniel Although the documentary is in Welsh there are English subtitles.
  44. 1 point
    Here are a few jazz rock/fusion albums that I have heard and enjoy - unlike @Sanctuary These albums combine jazz with other influences, notably rock, folk, symphonic or psychedelic. More information can be found here http://www.progarchives.com/subgenre.asp?style=30 Santana - Abraxas (1970) Santana - Caravanserai (1972) Miles Davis - Bitches Brew (1970) Herbie Hancock - Crossings (1972) Mahavishnu Orchestra - Birds of Fire (1973) Mahavishnu Orchestra - The Inner Mounting Flame (1971) Ayres Rock - Beyond (1976) Blood, Sweat & Tears - Child is Father to the Man (1968) Sloche - Stadacone (1976) Modry Efekt and Radim Hladik (1974) Modry Efekt - Svitanie (1979) Out of Focus - Out of Focus (1971) Opus-5 - Contre-Courant (1976) If - If 2 (1970) If - If 3 (1971) If - Waterfall (1972) Arco Iris - Sudamerica (1972) Arte e Mestieri - Tilt (1974) Zingale - Peace (1977) Brother Ape - Karma (2017) Lot Lorien and Theodosii Spassov - Live in Ohrid (2009) Eela Craig - Eela Craig (1971) Deux ex Machina - Cinque (2002)
  45. 1 point
    I do feel that people with AS are more likely than others to value privacy due to having more "self-contained" personalities and valuing independence. As such they can particularly value living by themselves and find it harder when others come into their living space, whether those people are friends, family or other visitors such as those doing checks and maintenance. Aspies - particularly those living alone - may develop home lives that suit them but strike others as unconventional, e.g. not being very interested in home improvements, having unusual eating or sleeping habits. When visitors come, scheduled or otherwise, unconventional arrangements may come under scrutiny or efforts need to be made beforehand to "cover them up" to seem more conventional. The person with AS may feel judged. Unscheduled visits or ones at very short notice can be harder for someone with AS to deal with as they are more likely to have routines which are then disrupted. I suppose these things become easier the more often they happen but they may always be difficult to some degree. There can also be a tension as regards receiving support from friends, families or others. This support can be very valuable but it also means giving up some independence or privacy. Sometimes the support may not always be required but can be hard to change when others are used to giving it. Some friends, family but occasionally support workers may also worry that a person on the spectrum needs their interventions. Some of them may have misunderstandings that AS (in particular) makes a person vulnerable and in need of a lot of support but that well-intentioned (and often useful) support can restrict independence and sometimes be intrusive. The key is probably to commend people for their good intentions but advise them when their support is no longer needed or can be scaled back. It's not always easy to do that but it can be beneficial for all concerned in the long run.
  46. 1 point
    I totally understand the embarrassment. I think the best course of action here is to try and limit your interactions as much as possible with the person and try and keep it casual if you see them or their kids outside. Just smile and say hi if you choose and then say you have to go and continue on your walk. I think the idea of sending an apology note could be okay, as you could take your time to say what you want to say. I know that I am better at writing things down if I really want to say something. I think it helps also that the person has the opportunity to read and take in all you have to say without interrupting. I think we on the spectrum tend to overthink things and overexplain things a lot... which can make it worse. I have learned it is best to let things go. It helps when I write out what happened and how it makes me feel because at least I know my truth is written somewhere. I know it is difficult to move past it. I know with me, I do not like thinking others are upset with me. But I think at this moment, you both need time away from each other to settle and cool down and hopefully, in the future, you can be comfortable around each other again to be friends. Don't feel bad though, I think this situation got blown out of hand and hopefully, things settle down. It might be a good idea some time to let them know you have Aspergers or are on the spectrum and sometimes have trouble explaining yourself and hope they can give you the time to listen and that you did not mean any harm by what you said... but I think some time away might be good first. And just try to move past the incident as best as you can.
  47. 1 point
    Apsergers is from birth and therein is the acid test in diagnosing ASC - rather than acquired brain injury or anxiety / depression etc Myself - I did not know how to play with toys like other kids. Many toys seemed pointless and things like cars would just be lined up. I was dogmatic and could only understand things in a practical pragmatic sense ... so religion did not make sense - I did not understand idioms at all - or anything cryptic - I would get overwhelmed in public places - narrow range of interest - was quite a concrete thinker - I had a strong sense of being trapped in a body - I did not fit in socially - .... etc. ... there are so many fluid aspects that change as we move on through life There are online tests
  48. 1 point
    Because: 1. I was diagnosed. 2. Because I can relate to the experiences of other people who have it. 3. I know that I'm different to most other people, and other possible conditions or explanations don't explain it/cover it adequately.
  49. 1 point
    Ich spreche kein Deutsch, aber ich mag die Idee, es zu lernen. Ich bin niederländisch, also denke ich, dass es Ähnlichkeiten zwischen ihr und meiner Sprache gibt, die das Lernen erleichtern. Ich hoffe, ich habe das alles richtig geschrieben.
  50. 1 point
    Yes. Im always curled up on the couch with a book or just dozing, and my cat comes in and joins me. I always think we are just two of the same kind. Shes really sensitive to noise, and hates people. So whenever we hear a noise outside, a neighbour or footsteps of a postman, we both perk our heads up prepared to run haha. Unfortunately if there is someone coming she gets to hide under the bed or jump out the window and I have to do the people stuff.
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