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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/22/2018 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    Many people with AS are high achievers and almost are all at least average in terms of academic ability so any general argument that they lack abstract or higher order thinking is misplaced. However I do think there is tendency for those with AS to be drawn to (and sometimes distracted by) details and a desire to be comprehensive in their knowledge of a subject. This can be an asset in terms of rigour as they can be very skilled in spotting patterns and anomalies. However it can sometimes mean losing sight of the bigger picture. I have tended often to get bogged down in the details of a topic and too exhaustive in dealing with it, losing sight of the need to be more selective and concise. I'm not skilled in terms of portraying ideas in an imaginative and accessible way. Overall I think it's more accurate to say that those with AS can have an excellent eye for detail but not always to adept at pulling it altogether or communicating it in an accessible way. However there is no shortage of sophisticated thinking on the spectrum - the problem is often in expressing it to others.
  2. 1 point
    Yes, actually I did have difficulty with abstract thinking, and difficulty with certain subjects. However, the subjects I had difficulty with were not sciences, which are often based on a knowledge of facts and understanding of processes, but English lierature and algebra. I did well at subjects that require you to learn facts and understand processes and theories, and badly at those that needed a degree of interpretation and abstract thinking. Take poetry for example - I could learn poetry and quotes, when the teacher gave us notes on the correct interpretation of the notes, I did fine because I could just parrot what the teacher told me, but if I had to provide my own interpretation and understanding, that was a different matter. One skill which was required of us was to read and interpret an unseen poem, and I did really badly at this, I couldn't do it at all. I also couldn't organise my ideas into an eaay, couldn't write fast or think fast - it was a disaster. The best I could manage was a D. And yet, for physics, chemistry and biology I could get As no problem. Also, I had difficulty summarizing texts - I used to get caught up in the details and unable to prioritise which details were important and which weren't - for me, everything was relevant and important. So my essays just consisted of long lists of facts, with no summarizing and not organisation. Actually, I did well to get a D even. Another thing I had difficulty with was algebra, again because that requires abstract thinking and problems can't be solved by memorizing facts. I was not able to work round the problems or improve at it. Yet, in geormetry, which relies on visual thinking and memorising formulae, I did well. So: loved geometry, hated algebra. I was also very slow to finish tasks, the last to finish - I don't process quickly, and want to do things well and take my time over them, and won't move on until I know that they are perfect or correct. I was also easily distracted and likely to go off on a tangent. I also had social difficulties, meltdowns and other behavioural issues, or AS-related issues that were interpreted as behavioural issues. I was bottom of the class and the school decided that I was slow, and wanted to put me in the slow learners' class, or go to a special school, so basically yes, they thought I was 'thick', but I certainly am not thick, I just go at a different speed and process things in a different way. I most certainly disagree with the idea that I might have no real understanding of a science subject I study. I really don't know where they get this from. If I only gathered facts and had no overall understanding of the subject, I would not be able to understand the concepts and probably wouldn't be interested in sciences, and would have done badly at science subjects at school. It makes no sense.
  3. 1 point
    I don't know where you got that from, I would say the complete opposite is true, people on the spectrum tend to be logical, they are organised lateral thinkers (thinking outside the box, seeing the big picture) they have an analytical approach, all of this contributes to us often being more intelligent than those around us. However, a lot of people on the spectrum also have learning disabilities (I assume you do based on posts you have made, the math one springs to mind where you said you had to approach it differently to how you were taught it... the very definition of a learning disability) and that can mean that they struggle to grasp theories during education and if they cannot find a way around it and this might give the perception that they are stupid when in fact it is just that they need to learn differently to others. People with learning disabilities are not stupid.
  4. 1 point
    Who said this? Mr Bean? Thinking around problems is a basis of what I do! Abstract thinking, again, what I'm pretty much paid to do... if I couldn't do either of those I wouldn't get very far.
  5. 1 point
    Hey guys. I was was watching a tv show called Elementary a while ago (for those of you who may not be aware, this is a modern version of Sherlock Holmes in New York City). In a few episodes, there is a character who is on the spectrum, but prefers to use the term “neuroatypical”. From my understanding, this term means someone whose neurological structure or function does not fit in with what society says is normal, therefore it could be thought of as including a wide variety of conditions, rather than the term “autism”, which is more specific. I was wondering which term you guys prefer. To be clear, I’m on the spectrum as well.
  6. 1 point
    I prefer to use the term 'Asperger's' to describe myself, because that's what I was diagnosed with. I prefer the term 'neurodiverse' to 'neuroatypical' and would use that to describe the neurodiverse community as a whole, but not to myself, because I want to be more specific about my condition.
  7. 1 point
    I also misread the original post... I thought she was saying someone on the spectrum wanted to be called neurotypical... I wrote a funny reply likening it to gay people not coming out but I did catch it before posting I do try to check things before I post fortunately I am familiar with the term neuroatypical (and atypical) but I guess your word neurodiverse is nicer since it suggests diversity instead of atypical/abnormal traits/behaviour.
  8. 1 point
    OK, I can't spell and missed the significance of the letter 'a' in neuroatypical .... in fact today is the first time I have ever come across the word. I wouldn't want to be called anything I don't understand so ...
  9. 1 point
    Nuerotypical (NT) = 'normal' or people without neurological condition / label Nuerodiverse (ND) = different ... or to NTs not normal. This is not restricted to autism I prefer the term autistic, or autistic spectrum condition ... or aspergers ... I'm not sure the general public understand what those terms are in real terms though - so if I have to I will briefly qualify neurological excesses, differences and deficits in relation to the situation if for example I am asking for a reasonable adjustment with an organisation
  10. 1 point
    Someone on the spectrum is neuroatypical but that isn't very specific... that could mean you are a psychopath for example or any of a number of other neurological/psychological conditions. Personally I would say I am on the spectrum and if someone didn't know what that was I would say I had autism or Asperger's syndrome, people usually know at least a little about those, I wouldn't want to have them going away wondering what is 'wrong' with me
  11. 1 point
    @RiRi Thank you so much. You're really nice. My boss is really supportive of me and tells me the same thing. It's just hard because I'm in the same area as them. I think they're definitely jealous of me for some reason. My parents are really proud of me graduating from college with honors and getting and keeping a full time job. I've been lucky with my experiences. Just sometimes I get overwhelmed. I still live at home (but most people my age do now) but it's nice that I make my own money. What do you do if I may ask? Where do you live?
  12. 0 points
    Only question i have is how is that title humourous?
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