Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Willow

      Welcome to the forum!   09/17/2017

      Please come in from the rain and sit by the fire! We're happy you found us and hope you will feel at home here.  

Leaderboard

  1. Nesf

    Nesf

    Koby's Friend


    • Points

      15

    • Content count

      8,599


  2. Miss Chief

    Miss Chief

    Members


    • Points

      13

    • Content count

      843


  3. RiRi

    RiRi

    Koby's Friend


    • Points

      13

    • Content count

      6,009


  4. Eli

    Eli

    Members


    • Points

      12

    • Content count

      72



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/10/2017 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    This is something I wanted to say, particularly to any young Aspies who are feeling particularly lost, confused or alone. A state in which I am very familiar. I've come to the point in my life, that I actually am very pleased with who and what I am. I have no problem with having Aspergers, and in a way, I'm proud. I find myself in a sort of middle ground. I've noticed there are some Aspies who are of this mindset:" I am what I am and I shouldn't have to change for stupid NTs and their backwards world". I've also noticed Aspies who are of this mindset: " How do I fit in? How is it done? I just wanna make friends, I just want to fit in, tell me what to do, help, help!" I'm right in between, because as far as fitting into the NT world, I want to insofar as that it benefits me. There's no getting around the fact that sometimes you need other people to get things done, and most of those people are NTS who need the world to make sense and be neat and tidy in their judgments throughout the day. I'm past analyzing it, NTs out in the world help civilization function, and that benefits me, so I push myself to fit in so long as it benefits me. But I don't consider it to be changing myself, I consider it to be another tool in my toolbox. And when I see Aspies struggling to fit in and be like NTs, I have the tendency to want to pull them aside and say,"the more desperate you are, the further they'll push you away." They're pack animals. If you're acting weak, they'll see you as weak, and they'll distance themselves. If you embrace who and what you are with no shame and no need of their approval, you will often come across as an alpha, and you'll have their allegiance. But do you really want it? I just wonder sometimes, if Aspies really want to be like NTs, or if they just want it to be easier, so it makes sense to say they want to fit in. Don't get me wrong, I remember wanting to fit in when I was a kid. But looking back, it was never truly that I wanted to fit in, I just wanted less confrontation. I don't like the idea that an Aspie is feeling some pressure from someone or some situation that's causing them to try to mutilate who they are in order to "fit in". What is fitting in, anyway? It's fleeting, for one thing. And doesn't have nearly the amount of meaning and sentiment young Aspies think. Don't try to fit in because you think there's love to be found in it. Fit in only so long as it benefits your day-to-day life. That's my opinion, anyway. In my own experience, the more I've tried to fit in, the more unhappy I became. The more I've just let myself be free to be me, the happier I am. And for the most part, people either like me or don't. And as it happens, any time someone has not liked me, they're not interesting in any way, so it doesn't matter. If you ever managed to change yourself to fit in, you'd be living in a cage of your own creation. Know how to function in their silly little world, but at the end of the day, know who you are and love it. The words happiness and love are so misused and misunderstood. No one is responsible for my happiness. And love is not the same as attachment. Happiness is not something you go off on an adventure to find, it's already in your possession. It is there, ripe for the plucking, every moment of every day. And love is found at the center: orbiting you is all the debris left behind from relationships gone wrong, all the little hurts and failures that left scars and misalignments. But none of that is real, and none of it is you. The only you lies at the very center, untouched by worldly affairs. And all that you are is love. In case you were wondering who you are.
  2. 4 points
    @Biker1 I do get the statement of not being a fan of people. I've said that many times in a similar enough way to you. And analyzing, I think it's because I've had so many negative experiences with people and because I'm an introvert. However, seeing how I'm here on this forum, I can say that statement is only true to some extent or could be rephrased because I do talk to some people and I genuinely care about others. Some people, I've found, even if they are very few, are nice and genuinely care. I don't really know what advice to give you or what else to say, but I also hope you feel better.
  3. 3 points
    I think generally as Aspies we have difficulties with interpretations and prefer very clear rules and distinctions. I used to work as a teacher and the sort of issues you mention are ones I've encountered many times and I understand your frustration. Whether students are too loud depends so much on the context, e.g. the activity they're doing, start or end of a lesson or the school day. It's not easy to judge what level is right except to be guided by whether the noise level allows the best conditions for learning and doesn't impinge on other classes. The optimum noise level though isn't silence or even quiet except for certain tasks. As much as possible you can be guided by what you see and hear in other lessons and what students and teachers say but that again is only an approximate guide as expectations and preferences can differ so much. I would ask your students and staff about whether they feel sound levels are OK and to let you know if they think they aren't. What isn't right is if no-one tells you or undermines you as the teacher who came into your room did. If she or he felt the sound was too loud this could have been tactfully mentioned to you afterwards. I hope you get some clearer guidelines and things get better for you.
  4. 3 points
    It's logical that the students are going to be a bit noisy while packing up to go home, one can expect that. Perhaps the other teacher hadn't finished his lesson yet, or is very strict. Does the school you work at have a bell? If so, it's probably best to keep them quiet until the bell goes, after that it's the offical end of the period and no one can really complain about the noise.
  5. 3 points
    I hope you feel better soon. It is hard to break the cycle of negativity. Try to think of even one thing you are thankful for. Happiness starts with being happy with what you have in the present, even if it feels like you don't have enough. Also, remember, it always feels like other people have it better, but everyone goes through troubles. I hope you find things to be happy about soon.
  6. 2 points
    I wouldn't worry about this PandaPrincess - I think you did the right thing at the time. If you are a new teacher in a school such as a substitute teacher it is best to precisely follow the instructions of other teachers unless it's an emergency such as a student who is very clearly ill. It is far better to be too strict in these cases than too lenient. Students can sometimes "test" a teacher by asking to go to the bathroom and agreeing to it unless it's plainly essential can be seen as a sign of the teacher being a "soft touch" and lead to them pushing other rules. If you're uncertain of the policy in a gym lesson you should ask other people who teach gym on what they do - or if they're not available some other senior teacher - but if you've been advised by another teacher not to let the students go out it is safest to follow that advice. You could even tell the students they can bring bottles of water to the lesson if you're worried they might get thirsty or tell them to drink enough beforehand but the safest policy is to check on what other gym teachers do.
  7. 2 points
    Yeah, it's not fail safe. But I do find that people tend to respond well to genuity and sense another person's sense of self. A lot of it is about attitude and how you carry yourself. There have been ideas I've expressed to NTs that they don't get on board with, but I can still get away with a degree of deviance without it alienating me or causing social problems. But truth be told, it's possible they all talk about how weird I am when I'm not around, I just really don't mind. It's their right to do so and doesn't need to change me. And that's the attitude people respond well to. It makes people feel stable and comfortable to be around someone who is stable and comfortable with who they are. And the other thing is that NTs have oddities and whimsies too, they're just afraid to express them for fear of rejection. When you express your own it sometimes encourages them to do the same and that's how bonds are created. But that's another topic. 😀
  8. 2 points
    Thank you so much, everyone. I feel better, for the first time in days. Been having some weird ups and downs, but this feels different. I'm feeling very hopeful. Each and every post helped me and I appreciate it!
  9. 2 points
    It is bizarrely difficult to get used to looking into someones eyes and initially does require alot of will and determination. It was like trying to join two same poles of a magnet for myself. At one time it was impossible no matter how hard I tried.. I agree that initially its hard to know which eye and even which part of the eye to look at. It takes time before the focused tunnel vision relaxes into taking in the landscape - rather than focusing on a particular small detail. I tend to micro focus anyway so it can be an issue that comes and goes .... I don't view myself as an actor so am not overly bothered anymore. Suspicious or needy types tend to view not looking = shady ... or looking = staring /aggressive. Its noticeable that some other peoples eyes tend to dart around a bit but suppose some of that might be what they are accustomed to environmentally / momentum wise. I can easily look into eyes now but my eyes tend to linger too long while processing what I'm seeing. When younger I skimmed the book 'how to win friends and influence people by dale carnegie' ... not the sort of thing I'm really into, but it did touch on the theoretical significance of handshakes and eye contact etc.. Also the 'use your head and use your memory books by Tony Buzan' touched on significance of observed eye direction which helped give me an interesting reason to look into eyes. (google image search 'eye direction lying' ). Also researching iridology, EMDR therapy or any other eye stuff can help with motivation to study/look at eyes ... Unless its a interest I'm not sure its useful being overly aware of your own eye contact levels - it just contributes to pointless anxiety which breeds pointless insecurity which just gives other people another excuse to take a negative view. Its an odd phenomenon and I'm not sure whats its all about really ... preventing overwhelment? protecting ones vulnerabilities? fear of the unknown? boredom / lack of interest? I no longer really care
  10. 2 points
    Good to see you back Eliza. I've certainly done similar things and for similar reasons and I'm sure many other people have done the same. When we go through difficult times in our lives we may not want others to know - perhaps we feel a sense of embarrassment - and shutting ourselves away, maybe until things pick up again, is a tempting response. However sometimes it is good to talk about our situation to supportive people and they can help, whether it's just offering a sympathetic ear or offering some practical advice or support. Asperclick is always a good place to talk but there will be people in your everyday life who can help although I know it's not always easy to let them know we're going through difficult times. I think the most important thing aside from talking to people is to get your mind occupied. Getting a new job - even if it's just a few hours a week or for a short-time or volunteering - can help you get over the loss of the previous one and it gives you something to do. If a new job isn't available try to find some other activity that - ideally - you enjoy and which refocuses your mind from your problems. I hope things are better for you soon.
  11. 2 points
    Great post @Eli ! I think this is important for anyone to read, not just about fitting in with NTs but fitting in with anybody, even fellow people on the spectrum! Because we are all unique individuals and we all have something special to share with this world. There is no normal. I think it definitely gets easier with age and experience. I am not that old yet but I know I am more confident with myself and have a better understanding of myself, whereas just a few years ago, I was less sure of myself and timid and more nervous to be myself in public.
  12. 2 points
    I agree with Sanctuary about the other teacher's comment. That kind of comment is most appropriate in private. Having said that, I tend to think that since it is your classroom, you are the one who decides what the rules are. And I'm also of the mindset that you can be a little selfish, here. Make the rules that make your life easiest. But what I will say, is that once you make those rules and define those terms, be completely uncompromising. If students think there is wiggle room, they'll have you tearing your hair out.
  13. 2 points
    Chris Packham on living with Asperger's: 'I’ve spent 30 years on the telly trying my best to act normal'
  14. 2 points
    So do you want friends/family? Do you think they are better than 'other' people? I'm not having a go or anything I suppose in some ways they are better than other people but perhaps because you hold them to a higher standard they can also let you down very easily too. I'm not really sure how you manage to have no friends at all, they tend to force their way into my life and while I am completely shit at keeping in touch they tend to reach out to me every so often to keep things going, I suppose it can be done but it must require some real effort to push everyone away. I am going to assume you have a motor bike, how the hell do you go out on that without meeting other bikers? You pull over for a smoke within 10 minutes you have 6 friends (on a nice day), you pop in the shop you got 4 admirers by the time you get back to the bike, it doesn't even really matter what bike it is, it could be a bandit, a harley or a CBR. Does being jobless at this time of year bother you... cause I have to say this time of year is one of the easiest to find work if you're not fussy, perhaps you could even do some volunteering? Plenty of charities and soup kitchens crying out for help as the winter comes in, especially if you don't have family commitments over the festive period. I assume you are on benefits so volunteering won't interfere with that but it will get you up and out and around people and seeing mostly that there is some good in the world but also perhaps that some people have it a lot worse than you... even if you can't face doing that maybe next time you see a homeless dude stop and give him a smoke but instead of walking off chat to him while he smokes it, you never know you might make a friend but even more than that it might snap you out of your slump to realise no matter what you think you are not alone on this earth, even if you wish you were you're life still impacts others. What I'm trying to say is that your life is your own and only you are responsible for it but you must have made a big effort to exclude everyone from it and if you regret that, well it is very easy to let people back in, you could start here online... feel free to PM me anytime, or you could go meet people at a volunteer place, colleagues will quickly become friends and as long as you don't push them all away eventually a friend will either become or introduce you to family. It just so happens that I am at a bit of a lose end this year for Christmas and I am thinking about maybe going to help out at a soup kitchen or some such. I'm not entirely sure what you mean by praising apathy... if we are truly apathetic we wouldn't have answered at all, but I do think it can be difficult for us to know what you need to hear, it's a pretty tough title and post, we don't want to say anything to make you feel worse, but we don't really know you well enough to help.
  15. 2 points
    Maybe you should set some guidelines in your classroom. Like the students can talk, but not be too loud. Maybe you can use the 6 inch voices method? I think I remember teachers using it on me in the classroom or I can't remember if I used it on students. That's why I can't remember very well how it goes, but what I'm trying to say is use a method where they know what it means by you just saying the name of the method. Some teachers I guess might be quiet towards the end or maybe class doesn't end until the bell rings, whatnot. At first when I read your post, I thought that maybe she likes her classroom quiet, but that doesn't mean you have to also keep yours quiet, after all, it is your classroom. I don't have experience with the logistics of running an 8-3pm classroom so I don't really know how that works. But, I think if other teachers start complaining then you will have to lower it down at least a little maybe because neighboring classrooms are like having a roommate. Like a good roommate would be mindful of their roommate and whatnot while remembering they also have to get their own things done. Like be mindful of them, but also be mindful of you. To be honest, I think that teacher went a bit overboard if she raised her voice like that. There's no need for that. She could have told you at least without raising her voice. Doing what she did, I believe should not be the way to get someone to stop or start doing something. I wish you could carry and manage your classroom however you want. You can't always please everyone. What do you mean by they will think you're being over dramatic? Do you mean that if you responded to their assumptions with the real reason, they'll think you're being over dramatic? I can relate to wanting to explain myself because I don't like being misjudged. Could you ask a teacher who seems nice and non-judgmental what are their guidelines in their classroom? Like for them what is considered too loud? etc. Would that be okay to do? I believe this is a learning process and people learn from others. I remember I had teachers who'd meet with other more experienced teachers and they'd get ideas from them.
  16. 2 points
    So I went for my formal assessment today and I have been diagnosed with ADHD... I am being put on Methylphenidate Hydrochloride initially but he will be seeing me again in a month to assess how I'm doing on those and to adjust dose etc there are quite a lot of medication options, so it'a going to be trial and error, also he thinks that my OCD is actually an ADHD trait so maybe I don't have that after all and he is referring me to some talking therapies (CBT?) but the wait for that is over 18 months so that one will be a while yet. The best news was that the meds might help with the sleep issues which is my main issue at the moment and there is even a chance that my depression will improve once I'm on the right medicine/dose as I will cope better with life and so I might not get so low etc.
  17. 2 points
    That's a bit like me working at a language school and liking to teach grammar (or at least find it not too bad), but hating speaking activities and want to avoid them and skip past them. Problem was, one of the reasons they hired me was to do speaking activities
  18. 1 point
    For those wanting to learn any Romance language, here are some general notes about learning these languages. The way to begin, if English is your native language, is by looking at words we get from the language in question as well as learning how to convert the Latin part of English into that language. We can identify Latin derived words in English often by their endings. These endings include: *-ion *-able/-ible *-ant/-ent *-ade *-age Words with these endings are spelled the same in French as in English and often mean the same, just differing in pronunciation. For example, the word 'table' has same meaning in French and English. Every letter of that word pronounced in English is also pronounced in French, but it only has one syllable in French, the <a> sounded as in 'father.' In Spanish and Portuguese words ending in -al are also spelled like in English but with a difference in pronunciation. Words ending in -able/-ible are spelled the same in Spanish as in English and French but the pronunciation is different again, with the <e> on the ending sounding as in 'elavator.' Spanish and Italian both add an -e to -ant/-ent words. Many dialects of Italian, except in the north,* also add the same letter and sound to -al words. -tion becomes -cion in Spanish and -zione in the same Italian dialects that add 'e' to -al words. Words ending -able/-ible in English, French and Spanish end in -abile and -ibile in Italian. In Portuguese, the 'b' in the middle of Latin words becomes a 'v' giving words like provável. Notice how the -able becomes -ável. Similarly, -ible becomes -ível as in possível. In Romanian, -able/-ible becomes -abil/-ibil, like in Italian but without the -e. But words ending in -ant and -ent are spelled the same as in English, just differing in pronouncation. All Romance languages have noun gender, and these same endings also identify the gender of nouns. Nouns are those words that can have 'the' in front of the in English. For example, all nouns ending in -ion in French and Spanish and -ione in Italian are feminine in all Romance languages. This includes Portuguese where -tion becomes -ção and -sion becomes -são, both these Portuguese endnings like like the English word 'sound' but without reaching the <n> or pronouncing the <d>. It also includes Romanian where -sion becomes -sinue or -ziune and -tion becomes -ție. And nonuns ending in -ant, like 'restaurant', and -ent such as 'moment' are also masculine in all Romance languages, this includes Spanish and Italian where an -e is added onto the end. Nouns ending in -ation can also be used to find verbs in the same word family by other conversion techniques. In French, replacing the -aiton with -er gives the from of a verb with the same meaning as 'to' in front of a verb in English. In Spanish and Italian respectively, replacing the -ation with -ar and -are gives the to-form of a similar verb. In Romanian there is a very neat trick where cutting off the -ion from an -ation word gives equivalent of the -ed form of a verb, and then dropping the -t gives the he/she/it form of the verb. *Italian has a lot of dialects the Florentine one being what we know of as "Italian", some, such as Siclian are as different from the Florentine dialect as is Spanish, Sardinian even more so. A lot of words in these dialects end in vowels and these languages have a distinct prosody that has something to do with this. This prosody can be heard in central and southern Italian accents in English and causes vowels to be added onto English words, as in 'I don't understanda, I not speaka good Inglese.'
  19. 1 point
    I agree with @RiRi. There's no such thing as a 'trivial' word. As far as I'm aware, there's nothing in the rules of the game that says that the word has to be different or dissimilar to words in English, so RiRi can post whatever word she likes. Unless @HalfFull decides otherwise. Ok, the last word started with N, so: ochi (Romanian) = eye.
  20. 1 point
    Okay. I acknowledge that this is your opinion. However, I think it's pretty interesting/fascinating that words can be similar across some languages. To me, they're not trivial examples because I think sometimes people don't know that a word in Spanish resembles a word in English (unless they hear it, maybe). So if the chance arises, I will continue posting Spanish words which are similar in spelling and sometimes in pronunciation to the English language.
  21. 1 point
    I think this is a very good way of putting things. Every type of lifestyle has costs but also benefits. Each type can seem quite alien to the other but neither is better or worse in general terms.
  22. 1 point
    Sorry to read you lost a job. Hopefully you can find another thats better than the last one. I lost my job too ... or rather was pushed out. Going to work, (whether its enjoyable or not) does provide a focus, momentum and inner rhythm. When the job is gone the cognitive momentum does freewheel to an eventual halt for some. I think it takes some of us longer to process what happened, adapt and commit to refocusing. How to get out of the funk? I can only assume getting over the trauma of the circumstances surrounding the employment terminating, re-establish some physical and mental strength and well-being, make yourself have a little trivial fun and recommit to something you believe will work for you employment wise. I have I think given up trying to look for long term employment because it eventually seems to go terminally wrong ... (no particular fault of my own, I just tend to take issue with power freaks and liars) so I am going to take a shorter term view this time which might make it easier for me to adapt / switch roles if needed. Lonely, bored, mentally fried are all terms I can relate to ... I think you need to ask yourself - what have you got? ... and ... what are you going to do with it? Life seems to require the ability to pick oneself up and start again repeatedly.
  23. 1 point
    Yes, I do. I sometimes feel depressed and am absent from here for a while. Last year I had a serious health issue that I found difficult to cope with, and I was away from here for a long time. I tend to withdraw and shut down when anxious or depressed. I have projects through the summer months to keep me busy and from dwelling on things. I did a translation, and I am constantly updating and expanding my music collection.
  24. 1 point
    Hi guys, My name is Coby Rees. I am the newest member registered on this group since today. I would like to talk about Aspergers Syndrome and Facebook. I know this may sound silly coming from a 21 year old, but I have been on Facebook since 2009 and haven't got a clue how to use it most of the time only to chat to friends and post the odd status now and again. My spelling isn't exactly 'spot on' grammar because sometimes I struggle to spell. Feel free to comment, more than happy to reply back
  25. 1 point
    Hi, Eli. I'm probably the oldest person on this site and I needed this post tonight!
  26. 1 point
    Hope the meds work for you and you get your answers, good you've started that journey to find the one that works. I got diagnosed at 39 and again this year at 46, tried some meds but failed, they stopped working. Learning coping mechanisms etc doesn't help that much, so that's rubbish, it's tireing at best.
  27. 1 point
    @Fighter101 I don't know about the topic of the twitching, but I get twitching in my eyes sometimes when I'm significantly stressed. Either sleep deprived or just stress on its own. Then when stress levels are reduced, it goes away. I know that coming to terms with the condition, learning that there's a name for something you've had your entire life, can take a while. I know it took me a while, like more than a year to come to terms with it, that I'm autistic and that there's nothing wrong with being the way that I am. Sorry I can't offer much help regarding the subject, but I hope you figure out what's going on. I agree with @Nesf that if it continues to be a problem you should see a doctor.
  28. 1 point
    Ive noticed my legs have started twitching at night, im not sure what cause of it is Have you always had twitching since a young age or is it happening since you become adult?
  29. 1 point
    Some occasional twitching is normal, but if it is happening a lot to the extent that you can't control it and it impedes your functioning, then it could be Tourettes. It's possible for a person the have Tourettes and for it to be dormant, or suppressed for years, and then become aparent at a later stage. Twitching can be worsened by anxiety. If it is becoming a problem, then you should see a doctor.
  30. 1 point
    I'm not sure any of it matters. Not enough and you are hiding something (shifty) ...... too much (staring) and you are aggressive Middle ground is a mystery I'll never get
  31. 1 point
    So you have a video of them videoing you? Is it legal that you videoed them? Perhaps they took the video to use as evidence to show your care worker/health professional or to protect themselves from false allegations? Also how exactly did you provoke them into videoing you? Have you considered you might have an easier time if you stopped provoking people?
  32. 1 point
    Before anyone can answer your question, I think you'll need to provide us with a little more detail - e.g.: Why did you provoke the staff into filming you? What were they filming?
  33. 1 point
    Not sure what you mean. If they have filmed you illegally (first check the legality of filming in your state) - report them to the body that oversees care establishments in your state. In the UK we have the Care Quality Commision (CQC) vaguely overseeing non council establishments. If you complain make sure you get confirmation of what part of the complaint they have documented. Ask for a copy of your complaint so its clear Seems fairly standard for organisations not to take the full complaint (less hassle for them and more chance of wriggling out of liability issues). The CQC is conned regularly by care organisations ... and also in my experience they are not that good at investigating. Good luck ... hope things improve
  34. 1 point
    In a general sense, I feel that I can make eye contact when I have to, at least I think I can. I have felt it as an obligation to do so because I think that's the NT thing to do. However, it is extremely difficult. Often times I've found myself trying to make eye contact, but being unable to pay attention to what the person said because I'm too preoccupied with the eye contact making. When I don't make eye contact because I just feel too uncomfortable to do so, I try to nod or do some indication that I'm listening. What's weird is that other day I was talking to someone and I was making eye contact fine, at least I think I was, but when I told them that I'm autistic, I felt like I needed to make less eye contact because I felt like the person wouldn't believe I'm autistic. I think it was stupid to do that actually and also because I felt it was obvious I was exaggerating it. So it probably had the opposite effect. She probably figured it out that I was exaggerating it. Apparently, I can make eye contact sometimes. I feel maybe I can make it more so with people I'm more comfortable with. However, I have been told that when I talk I glance (make eye contact briefly) and then look away quickly. All of this, of course, happens subconsciously. So maybe I'm not perceiving it correctly and maybe with that person I was doing the same thing. Maybe my eye contact was already poor so I didn’t need to exaggerate it. Or maybe I wasn't and my eye contact was good. I just feel I was stupid to do that, though. To this day, I still continue to overanalyze the incident.
  35. 1 point
    Im the real life female Greg House or Sherlock holmes. I do background screening for people looking for employment. In fact there are alot of parallels between me and House when it comes to work. Im in a supervisor role and I know I can be too blunt with people and tend to see my candidates as subjects rather than people. Part of my job was customer service. I hated it with a vegence just like House hated clinic duty. Id love to watch reruns where he avoids clinic duty as it is just like me
  36. 1 point
    Hi Willow I've just posted on topic about jury service but realised I may have put it in the wrong area. Would you mind moving it to the "help and advice" area please, thanks
  37. 1 point
    Come back you bastard.
  38. 1 point
    I am really bad at making eye contact. I know it makes me look awkward and perhaps ill mannered, but it makes me so uncomfortable I just cannot do it most of the time.
  39. 1 point
    Hey Guys, Here is Poem I have written from my heart it is about me having feelings for woman as I am bisexual. I sometimes find it hard tell someone I like them. I Wish I sometimes wish we were lovers. I sometimes wish I could romance you. I sometimes wish we kissed each other. I sometimes wish we explored. I wish I could make you happy like he does. I wish we could touch each other. I wish I could take away the emotion pain from what that bitch did to you. I wish I could wipe away the pain of the passed. I wish I could make everything alright. I wish you were bi curious I wish I could hug you I wish I could love you in that way. I wish I could tell you.
  40. 1 point
    Good poem. We all feel the way we feel, and poetry is a good way forward.
  41. 0 points
    ahem, any chance of staying on topic pleease...🙄
×