Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Willow

      Welcome to the forum!   09/17/2017

      Please come in from the rain and sit by the fire! We're happy you found us and hope you will feel at home here.  

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

the strangest man

After your diagnosis

Recommended Posts

the strangest man

After your diagnosis what did you find out about yourself that surprised yourself; a ha ha moment, and what did you find surprisingly useful.

 

I realised I only had tow places for people; either you were my friend or you were not my friend. So at work I didn't have friends, colleagues, people I'd met only once or twice and bosses, you were either one or the other.

 

I've found making lists is really useful way of lowering stress levels, hunting for Christmas presents becomes much more enjoyable when I have a notebook to record what I might buy the kids or SWMBO (She who must be obeyed). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Saveyourscissors

I think my literal thinking surprised me as it was suddenly pointed out and I didn't notice til after it got pointed out ha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Frankie

At first I didn't find out much then a few years later my socialworker said it makes me have tunnel vision & very talented 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nesf

How rigid in thinking people think I am, and my mum says that when we go out somewhere, shopping for example, she always feels that I'm not really there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AutismUnrestricted

After my diagnosis, I felt more compassion for myself and all the difficult times in the past where I was rejected and bullied, I previously thought I have to try hard to make that right but now I just don't care about it. I feel better for the diagnosis as it lets me be me instead of trying to copy other people who I have nothing in common with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toran

After my diagnosis, I felt more compassion for myself and all the difficult times in the past where I was rejected and bullied, I previously thought I have to try hard to make that right but now I just don't care about it. I feel better for the diagnosis as it lets me be me instead of trying to copy other people who I have nothing in common with.

It is a major changing point in your life and realising there is a reason beyond your control puts a whole new perspective on the way your life is.

Its important to focus on this and you have to decide if your going to tell people about Aspergers or if your going to keep it on a kind of need to know basis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RiRi

I had been making lists of things to do, which they sort of help because I get to cross out things once I do them, but they don't help me stay on task on a daily basis. I forget that I should be doing other things and just spend my time doing things that I like instead of the things that should get done. I've noticed that I also have rigid thinking patterns, like someone can tell me to do things a certain way, but I remain doing it the way I've been doing it. I'm a literal person too. I'm also hypersensitive, things get to me really easily. Also, if I strongly believe in something and someone else disagrees, I would want them to agree with me so I would try to persuade them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SeanS

The first things I noticed were my rigid thinking and poor executive functioning. More recently alexithymia and aphantasia.

 

The most useful thing is the fact that I can accept myself as I am. When I was growing up I was told I was evil or broken somehow; looking back with the new information I have I would have to say that was a reaction to my lack of emotional reciprocity. Most of this happened a few months ago, when I first realised I must be on the spectrum. The blanket of depression I've been wearing my whole life was lifted. My formal diagnoses confirmed and reinforced these feelings. I've stopped beating myself up for not living up to society's social standards and I've stopped second guessing myself.

 

Great thread "the strangest man!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr-David-Banner

It's had pluses and minuses. I think before diagnosis I kept trying to do things I couldn't do because I felt there was nothing wrong with me. I was struggling like hell to hold down a job and do the most basic stuff and I felt lack of success must be due to lack of effort. When I came to view the whole thing in context of spectrum issues, it was a huge jigsaw that fell into place. However, it also gave an awareness of my severe limitations in certain areas and also the fact I'd definitely been discriminated against from school and onwards, even if unknowingly. So, part of the result was almost negative. It gave me an excuse. Not that the excuse was invalid. I really do struggle like hell to do the most basic tasks.

For example, once I was working at this large company and was put onto a conveyer belt I.T. packing system. You had to bag up items and type information onto the computer but be quite fast at the same time, It was nimble fingered speed work and I simply couldn't do it. Within  a short space of time, people were getting on my case and a Boss was called out and it was a bit uncomfortable. I never mentioned any of these issues as I keep it very quiet but in the past I simply couldn't understand why simple things were always such a struggle.

These days I tend to sift through what I think I can do well and what I feel I can't. Sure, I can solder and do engineering assembly but I'd be hopeless in a  hotel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×