Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Willow

      Welcome to the forum!   09/17/2017

      Please come in from the rain and sit by the fire! We're happy you found us and hope you will feel at home here.  
Willow

What age did you get diagnosed?

Recommended Posts

Willow

So, how old were you? And was this a good or bad thing? ie. I was diagnosed in my late teens and it kind of sucked...to be honest. Because along with hormones, I really didn't need something else to deal with. I feel like I could have got more support through school had I been diagnosed earlier. :(

  • Helpful 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fireandshadows

I'm sorry it sucked for you, Willow. I was 17 when I got diagnosed (I'm 19 now) and I agree that I could have got a lot more help at school if I had known. However, it was also a great relief to finally have an explanation for why I was so different. I just wish I'd had that explanation earlier, it might have saved a few shreds of my self-esteem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Akirasugoineko

I god diagnosed at age of 27. Way too late. If I got diagnosen more early I could had had a chance to do school better and learn stuff like social interaction and stuff more early . Also Since I been diagnosed, i feel that I have less self eestem then before. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cassidyeden

Hey! I'm Cassidy! I was diagnosed at 17 and I'm 19 now. I wish I was diagnosed earlier.:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neron

I'm 19 and got diagnosed s few weeks ago. Too bad I didn't get diagnosed earlier as spent a lot of time why I was as I am. It is a nice feeling to know the reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rooroo

  im  28   i  was  diagnosed  um  maybe  at age 24

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FireWire

It will be a year in march for when I got my diagnosis I will be 29 then, I had no help in school teachers thought I was just being difficult and left me to get on with it. I wish I had a diagnosis earlier as I would have got the help I needed at school instead of being left with no help and no support, I never had any friends in school I preferred to be on my own. I'm sure there where signs I was different but no one picked up on them. It wasn't until I got with my now fiancé that she noticed I was different, and pushed the doctors to find out what was up with me. At first they said I was just depressed but my fiancé thought there was more to it than just depression and within that week I got a referral to a specialist which was a long drawn out process, but they finally came back with a diagnosis for Asperger's Syndrome. it all makes sense now and all the peaces of the puzzle fit so to speak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alex

I was diagnosed with AS at age 15, and I'm almost 18 now. I too wish I had been diagnosed earlier since my whole life has been filled with anxiety issues and social interaction issues, so I could have used the support.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Erythrura

It's interesting to see that everyone here was diagnosed fairly 'late'. Did most of you realise that you had Aspergers before you were officially diagnosed? Did you receive any support after your diagnosis? 

 

I was diagnosed at 16. When I was 11, a teacher told my mother that she suspected me of having AS, but my mother had grown up with undiagnosed Aspies and thought it was all 'normal'. It took a while for her to realise exactly why I was having problems. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Heather

I was diagnosed with AS at age 16.  I had never heard of AS until they diagnosed me, I had hardly even heard of Autism.  I remember always being a "shy" and "quiet" child... very anxious too.  Then I got to grade 8 and I guess the school learning department saw I was different and I remember seeing this therapist.  Then in grade 11 there was a lot more, including a trip out to a nearby city to see this psychologist.  I didn't really get why.. just that it had something to do with my being shy and quiet.  I don't know what would have been different if I had been diagnosed earlier.  But I remember it was nice to put a reason behind why I sometimes feel different to other people.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff

14 I'm currently 26 and will be 27 In march

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
StormCrow

 I was Diagnosed with AS at age 27 and I'm 30 now

 

I had ADD through school so I think most of my weirdness was associated with that,

but the AS diagosis was good because It made more sense to me.

The things that I observed with other ADD people were not the same with me (if that makes sense). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Willow

It seems like a lot of people get diagnosed in their late teens. I wish there was something more prominent in an Aspie child which prompted people to look for a diagnosis earlier.

 

As a child I was very quite around people, although my Mum said I was extremely agitated as a baby and would cry all the time. I played alone, with toys other children didn't find interesting, or I would play with them in a way they weren't intended for. I was quick to learn and knew my number and alphabet before I started school and progressed through the levels of reading very quickly. But none of these are classed as negative things, at least, not enough to spark any attention from school or therapists. :( 

 

What were like as a child, those of you who were diagnosed in their late teens?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fireandshadows

@Erythrura:

It's interesting to see that everyone here was diagnosed fairly 'late'. Did most of you realise that you had Aspergers before you were officially diagnosed? Did you receive any support after your diagnosis? 

 

I had never even heard the term Aspergers until my brother was getting re-diagnosed and I read a book my gran had about it. It was probably about 3/4 years from realising I had it until I got diagnosed. I haven't really received any support since then.

 

@WillowHope:

What were like as a child, those of you who were diagnosed in their late teens?

 

As a child, I was also very shy and 'highly-strung' as my teachers put it. Apparently, I used to scream at my step-grandfather whenever he got me from pre-school. I think that because I totally didn't understand his sense of humour or where he was coming from, it made me unbearably anxious. Playing with toys consisted of organising them over and over, or playing through the same scenarios again and again. I had hyperlexia as a child, meaning I went from very low-level reading to reading perfectly competently overnight, but without necessarily understanding everything I read. I only ever had one close friend as a kid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
specialstar

I was diagnosed with autism at age 14, at age 12 they said i did not fit the criteria for asperger syndrome. at the time at special school I never knew i had this until age 16 but i was quite shocked and had to do a lot of research on this to help me understand myself better. I would saying having a diagnosis has helped me to control my behaviours that i was always getting into trouble. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
skeiner

I was diagnosed at age 21. I was quite happy that an expert told me, that the way I am is due to autism and not just "wrong".

What was the reason for you to go to a therapist or doctor to get diagnosed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KnarlyDUDE09

I was diagnosed in October of last year, just after I turned 17. For a while it felt good and for a while I felt a sense of relief; I finally began to feel a sense of self worth, and that I was different- not tainted, for a reason...But now I feel rather negative about it; I get no support from anyone, at all- nothing has really changed. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Willow
I was diagnosed in October of last year, just after I turned 17. For a while it felt good and for a while I felt a sense of relief; I finally began to feel a sense of self worth, and that I was different- not tainted, for a reason...But now I feel rather negative about it; I get no support from anyone, at all- nothing has really changed. :(

 

I didn't really get any support either. The best thing you can do is look at what stops you from doing things you enjoy/things you need to get done and figure out a way to cope with it better. I know it's hard, but once you can start to break through some of the barriers, it gets easier. And, to be fair, I'm not sure what support is actually widely available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anon

I have a question that I have always wanted to know the answer to: I have aspergers, but does that make me autistic? As in, people with autism are autistic, but are people with aspergers also autistic? Like would I (not that I'd want to) be able to say that I'm autistic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Willow
I have a question that I have always wanted to know the answer to: I have aspergers, but does that make me autistic? As in, people with autism are autistic, but are people with aspergers also autistic? Like would I (not that I'd want to) be able to say that I'm autistic?

This is what I've always wondered - I just say Aspergic - but it only works if you pronounce Aspergers with a soft 'G' instead of a hard 'G'.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alex
I have a question that I have always wanted to know the answer to: I have aspergers, but does that make me autistic? As in, people with autism are autistic, but are people with aspergers also autistic? Like would I (not that I'd want to) be able to say that I'm autistic?

I think that, since Aspergers is on the Autism Spectrum, you can say that you are autistic. But I also have the impression that people tend to think "Rain Man" (as in a more severely autistic person) when they hear that someone is autistic, which is probably caused by the media mostly showing severely autistic people, and thus not informing neuro typicals as much about mildly autistic diagnosis (like Asperger's Syndrome). So I feel that it's more convenient to just say that you have Asperger's, and then explaining that it's a kind of autism afterwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Willow
I think that, since Aspergers is on the Autism Spectrum, you can say that you are autistic. But I also have the impression that people tend to think "Rain Man" (as in a more severely autistic person) when they hear that someone is autistic, which is probably caused by the media mostly showing severely autistic people, and thus not informing neuro typicals as much about mildly autistic diagnosis (like Asperger's Syndrome). So I feel that it's more convenient to just say that you have Asperger's, and then explaining that it's a kind of autism afterwards.

Yeah I agree - whilst it would be nice to say Aspergic, it's easier to say Aspergers and explain it's a form of Autism - at least until Aspergic is widely recognised :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whoknows

You know, I never really cared about my age when that happened, because my parents raised me like if I was Clark Kent. Then, they told me about it in high school. Nothing happened at all. I just broke the mold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Heather
It seems like a lot of people get diagnosed in their late teens. I wish there was something more prominent in an Aspie child which prompted people to look for a diagnosis earlier.

 

As a child I was very quite around people, although my Mum said I was extremely agitated as a baby and would cry all the time. I played alone, with toys other children didn't find interesting, or I would play with them in a way they weren't intended for. I was quick to learn and knew my number and alphabet before I started school and progressed through the levels of reading very quickly. But none of these are classed as negative things, at least, not enough to spark any attention from school or therapists. :(

 

What were like as a child, those of you who were diagnosed in their late teens?

 

Apparently I was an extremely shy/quiet child.  Though I think my mother said I was a fairly contented baby.  I had a few seizures when I was about 2 years old, probably due to a body temperature problem, that have since not happened since I was a small child (my mom found, when they were coming due to a fever I'd get, she would give me garlic and they'd go away), and my dad apparently had them too when he was younger. 

 

I played alone mostly.  Though I did play with my sisters sometimes I think.  I was a stereotypical girl in the fact that I liked playing with dolls, especially baby dolls, though I did play with barbies sometimes.  I either played with them by myself or with my younger sister, as my older sister didn't care much for them.  I think to other people and even to myself looking back on it, my play with dolls looked pretty normal for a young girl.  Though I remember I played with them to a later age than most of my peers.  One day, I think around grade 6 or 7, I realized (I'm not sure why, maybe some kids were talking about it), I realized kids my age didn't play with them any more and I shouldn't either, so I put them in a box..

 

Also, I read some reports from my preschool teachers, and I always played alone at preschool, and even when kids tried to play with me I would just go off and play by myself somewhere else.  I didn't remember that so much, I thought kids just didn't come and play with me.  I didn't realize I actually moved away from where I was when they came and tried to play there too!  lol

 

When I got to elementary/primary school, I was still a very shy child, and found it hard to go to the bathroom at school, because I didn't want to go during class and interrupt it, and I didn't want to go when we were supposed to be outside at recess/lunch time!  And I remember I would end up walking around the school campus by myself most recess/lunch breaks, unless someone specifically asked to hang out with me and would wait for me to put my shoes on.. because I observed other students asking each other to wait until they got their shoes on.  (Indoor/outdoor shoes?  Probably pretty common in most elementary schools??)

 

As I've analysed my past behavior, and looked at how it was affected by my AS.  One way was that I always mimicked people (one aspect noted in many girls with AS).  I was quiet until I knew the "rules" and did not want to do anything that might be against them.  I even was "friends" with girls who didn't care what others thought.  But really, I cared what these girls who didn't care what others thought thought of me!  I think I often mimicked my older sister too.. she liked reading, I liked reading, and I did do very well with reading and writing, and most of my school work during elementary school especially.

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Willow

@squeeker I remember having dolls as a child but I only played with them when I had a big car which they could sit in and I could roll around. My main toys were small cars, which I organized by colour and line up. I also had a toy multi storey car park with a winding road/ramp type thing and I used to put the cars and the top and let go to see which one went the furthest. Oh, and I painstakingly cut out road markings from white paper and made a car park. :)

 

When I was really young, I used to mix up jigsaw puzzle pieces in a mixing bowl, with a wooden spon :)

 

I'm not sure if I moved away from children, but I don't recall playing with anyone either. I had a couple of friends, but they left the school :(

 

I was much the same as you about the bathroom thing. I found it an awkward experience, more so as I got older and girls got nastier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×