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      Welcome to the forum!   09/17/2017

      Please come in from the rain and sit by the fire! We're happy you found us and hope you will feel at home here.  
Willow

What age did you get diagnosed?

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Heather
@squeeker I remember having dolls as a child but I only played with them when I had a big car which they could sit in and I could roll around. My main toys were small cars, which I organized by colour and line up. I also had a toy multi storey car park with a winding road/ramp type thing and I used to put the cars and the top and let go to see which one went the furthest. Oh, and I painstakingly cut out road markings from white paper and made a car park. :)

 

When I was really young, I used to mix up jigsaw puzzle pieces in a mixing bowl, with a wooden spon :)

 

I'm not sure if I moved away from children, but I don't recall playing with anyone either. I had a couple of friends, but they left the school :(

 

I was much the same as you about the bathroom thing. I found it an awkward experience, more so as I got older and girls got nastier.

Aww that's cute!  Ahh something you wrote just reminded me of legos.  I remember playing with them a bit, we had the chunky lego and the little lego, and we could build houses and things.  And then that reminded me of playing Donkey Kong on the Nintendo 64 with my younger sister and her friend, but instead of the battling we were supposed to do, we played house.  There was baby diddy kong, and the little girl monkey, and then a "mom" and "dad" lol  I also remember having a little jeep for my barbie children ("Kelly" and "Tommy") and that was pretty neat.  I'm not sure if part of it was because I grew up with two sisters and no brothers, though out of them all, I was probably the one most into dolls.  I also had the little strollers to push the dolls in.  I had my "Water baby" doll which I loved and would bring when we went to visit my grandparents who lived out of town.

 

That's so cute that you would mix up jigsaw puzzle pieces in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon... I feel like that would have been something I would have done as a young child too.  Though I can't remember doing that exactly, I just remember liking to play house a lot.  I never had any of those road/ramp things for cars, but they did look cool.  I think the making the carpark with the white paper sounds interesting.  I think maybe maybe it's a fascination with mimicking real life scenarios, maybe to understand the world better? 

 

I was pretty lucky, I went to one school for the bulk of my elementary school education, grades kindergarten to grade 6, and when I went to my next school, I knew two girls (one girl had previously been at my old school, and the other girl went to our church).  Oh I also remember as a child, hating substitute teachers.  I had a few bad experiences with them.  I think it's due to not being able to handle change well either.  I'm glad to read similar experiences and share my own.

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KnarlyDUDE09

<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="WillowHope" data-cid="80" data-time="1358102581"><p>

I didn't really get any support either. The best thing you can do is look at what stops you from doing things you enjoy/things you need to get done and figure out a way to cope with it better. I know it's hard, but once you can start to break through some of the barriers, it gets easier. And, to be fair, I'm not sure what support is actually widely available.</p></blockquote>Thanks for the advice, Willow. :)

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Willow

@squeeker Hmm, the only 'games' I played were ones where I was teacher and I would do spelling tests and what not. I did mimick real things, I never really played in a way that couldn't happen in real life.

 

My first school was split into two sites at different ends of my village, so for 3 years you were in the lower building and then I think 4 years in the upper building. Switching to the upper was difficult because it pretty much meant never seeing my teachers from the lower school again. Then after that I went to secondary school which lasts 5 years, but I had to leave after 2 and go to a different school because of bullying, but then I got bullied at my new school and left after about 6 months - mostly because they had a new building built for them and I didn't like the new one at all - the change was too much for me to handle on top of the bullies.

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Willow
<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="WillowHope" data-cid="80" data-time="1358102581"><p>

I didn't really get any support either. The best thing you can do is look at what stops you from doing things you enjoy/things you need to get done and figure out a way to cope with it better. I know it's hard, but once you can start to break through some of the barriers, it gets easier. And, to be fair, I'm not sure what support is actually widely available.</p></blockquote>Thanks for the advice, Willow. :)

No problem :D

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specialstar
I think that, since Aspergers is on the Autism Spectrum, you can say that you are autistic. But I also have the impression that people tend to think "Rain Man" (as in a more severely autistic person) when they hear that someone is autistic, which is probably caused by the media mostly showing severely autistic people, and thus not informing neuro typicals as much about mildly autistic diagnosis (like Asperger's Syndrome). So I feel that it's more convenient to just say that you have Asperger's, and then explaining that it's a kind of autism afterwards.

 

I was told that people now see rain man in these days are high functioning

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Willow

A very well written, moving text A-S warrior :)

I too found my way to where you are today, moslty through being bullied. I hated it, but like you, needed it to become better (even though at the time, it felt like it would never get better).

Thanks for sharing!

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LukeSmith

I was diagnosed 3 months ago and i am 23, i always new i was different but avoided looking into the issue until lately due to not wanting to get labeled with anything that made me not 'normal' but by avoiding the issue i am now more secluded than ever before as the older i got the more i struggled to cope, luckily for me i have a very supportive long term partner so hope to work on a lot of my issues and have some improvement soon.

 

Also well done Willow nice to see this forum finally up and running, i follow you on you tube you and Chris are great!

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Heather
@squeeker Hmm, the only 'games' I played were ones where I was teacher and I would do spelling tests and what not. I did mimick real things, I never really played in a way that couldn't happen in real life.

 

My first school was split into two sites at different ends of my village, so for 3 years you were in the lower building and then I think 4 years in the upper building. Switching to the upper was difficult because it pretty much meant never seeing my teachers from the lower school again. Then after that I went to secondary school which lasts 5 years, but I had to leave after 2 and go to a different school because of bullying, but then I got bullied at my new school and left after about 6 months - mostly because they had a new building built for them and I didn't like the new one at all - the change was too much for me to handle on top of the bullies.

I remember playing games where I was a teacher.. it was cool because my dad worked at our church and got one of their old blackboards to use and we got chalk and could do it pretty well.  I know I also remember trying to make the overhead projector work with a flashlight and some kind of clear plastic I could find.. it didn't work really good, I never had good plastic sheets.  I can't remember now if I got it to sort of work.. 

And that is a lot of change, I can see how it would be hard for someone with AS. 

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Heather
Here's my story, A warrior's tale.

Very nice story, it's great to read how you dealt with your struggles and overcame them :)

 

I was diagnosed 3 months ago and i am 23, i always new i was different but avoided looking into the issue until lately due to not wanting to get labeled with anything that made me not 'normal' but by avoiding the issue i am now more secluded than ever before as the older i got the more i struggled to cope, luckily for me i have a very supportive long term partner so hope to work on a lot of my issues and have some improvement soon.

 

Also well done Willow nice to see this forum finally up and running, i follow you on you tube you and Chris are great!

That is great to read, it is great to have a supportive long term partner to help with the issues.  :)

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Willow
I was diagnosed 3 months ago and i am 23, i always new i was different but avoided looking into the issue until lately due to not wanting to get labeled with anything that made me not 'normal' but by avoiding the issue i am now more secluded than ever before as the older i got the more i struggled to cope, luckily for me i have a very supportive long term partner so hope to work on a lot of my issues and have some improvement soon.

 

Also well done Willow nice to see this forum finally up and running, i follow you on you tube you and Chris are great!

I'm glad you have someone to help you through it. I have my fiancé and it makes everything a lot easier :)

Thanks for following us on Youtube :D

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Guest Chris

I was diagnosed at 17. Aspergers is something I never really considered until I met Willow, but looking back on my life it just makes so much... sense!

 

I don't regret being diagnosed so 'late'. I think growing up assuming you're just 'normal' forces you to cope rather than be tempted to fall back on Aspergers for anything that's gone wrong socially.

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Willow

I do agree, that one of the (only) benefits of a late diagnosis is being forced to grow and push boundaries, rather than being able to fall back on Aspergers as an excuse, which must be tempting sometimes with an early diagnosis.

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Alex
I do agree, that one of the (only) benefits of a late diagnosis is being forced to grow and push boundaries, rather than being able to fall back on Aspergers as an excuse, which must be tempting sometimes with an early diagnosis.

As long as you, or someone else, doesn't push you too hard (i.e. more than you can handle)! I feel like I was pushed too hard by my school, parents, friends, myself etc. and that's what led me to a mental breakdown, after which I wasn't able to attend school...So I think it's important to find a balance between pushing yourself, and not pushing too hard...And if there is something you can't do, it's OK to use Asperger's as an "exscuse" or reason.

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Sofi

I was diagnosed with high functioning autism when I was 4 years old. 

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Mark

I was diagnosed at age 8. I think this was a very good thing for me.  I am surprised to see all of the late diagnoses, especially for males. Females are more likely to get diagnosed later because they are less likely to have behavior problems in school due to Aspergers.

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Mark
I was diagnosed in October of last year, just after I turned 17. For a while it felt good and for a while I felt a sense of relief; I finally began to feel a sense of self worth, and that I was different- not tainted, for a reason...But now I feel rather negative about it; I get no support from anyone, at all- nothing has really changed. :(

 

If you live in the USA and are still in High School you can file a complaint for them not giving you support because they are required by law to give you support. If they don’t comply you can sue. I don’t know the special education laws outside of USA though.

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Arthur

i was diagnosed at age 8 in Pennsylvania USA. a school teacher requested that go see physiologic did some IQ tests exetra some brain scans MRI  and was diagnosed with aspergers being diagnosed early was very helpfull so i was put into special Ed classes and put on Ritalin for ADD/ADHD. 

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ALC

I was diagnosed at 18, my mum noticed I had Asperger's when I was around two so she supported me with it the best she could. School was still a nightmare, I wouldn't let my mum leave the pre-school when she dropped me off, so she ended up working there. In Secondary school I just stopped showing up 'cause it was so boring and I hated spending time with all of my friends

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Stressmonster

Got my diagnosis just around the time i turned 31. Am now 33. I knew i had it about a year and a half before the diagnosis. Been through 3 different assesments so i've been assesed for everything there is in the book to rule out anything else. Have some experience with a couple of psychotic episodes earlier in life as well. Mostly due to drug abuse.

 

It was a relief to finally "get to know myself" at last after many years of struggling. But i am glad for all my experiences in life because i am no more or less the result of my experiences in life and i can't go about my life feeling bad about what i have become so i have decided to be glad for all i have experienced. It has made me who i am today.

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Anon

I was diagnosed at the age of 14 which, I don't know about the rest of you, but I feel is the age when people care the most about how they are perceived by the rest of the world...so it wasn't a very good experience for me! Almost a year of denial!

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mary

Wow, there really are a lot of late diagnosed people here aren't there.  I was diagnosed at 34, this was last year, and I haven't really received much support at all since.

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Andy
Wow, there really are a lot of late diagnosed people here aren't there.  I was diagnosed at 34, this was last year, and I haven't really received much support at all since.

 

Get thee to the poll and boost our numbers, it is looking that dire so far.

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Nesf
I was diagnosed at age 8. I think this was a very good thing for me.  I am surprised to see all of the late diagnoses, especially for males. Females are more likely to get diagnosed later because they are less likely to have behavior problems in school due to Aspergers.

Yes, this is true - I was diagnosed in November last year at the age of 41.  I didn't cause many behaviour problems at school, apart from the time I hit a teacher, and my teachers made comments like "a moody and erratic child" and "lacks in confidence", "slow to finish tests and exercises", "doesn't see the importance of tidiness and neat handwriting" and "has a tendency to misinterpret."  I was also teased quite a bit, especially in my earlier school years. So yes, I did have problems, but not the sort to draw the attention of the teachers. 

 

The only teacher who ever noticed that something was up was a private remedial teacher I once had because I was getting behind in school, who told my parents that she thought I had autism.

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Andy

Diagnosed at age 42 whilst in higher education am in my 45th year now. Before I was just a confused and angry depressive now I am still a depressive but what I feel is an oppressed depressive where before the world was my oyster it was down to me, now I have a disabled mind and doors which were open are now closed as even with my new found freedom to be myself, I still have narrow minded society to deal with.

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