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Scott

How to go about getting co-morbid conditions diagnosed?

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Scott

I have a feeling that I have more than just Asperger Syndrome; in fact, it's almost bloody certain. :P Is there any way to get any co-morbid conditions diagnosed quickly and painlessly?

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RiRi

I always wondered the same thing, Scott. I wondered if people who have multiple diagnosis went to a doctor and were just diagnosed with everything there, but I think some went to multiple people.

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Dont fit in on here

I wounder too how to get co morbid diagnosis with the mentle health side of it

I already dianosed with adhd as well has ASD

But im not sure if i have mood disorder of some kind or not

Sorry i cant tell you how to get help for it

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Muzical

I was diagnosed with ADD as a child, but that was re-checked when I was diagnosed with AS, because I was seeking to go back on medication for the ADD because open-office-environment is horrid for ADD or AS, let alone both, so the psychiatrist and psychologist both diagnosed the AS, (I think, on paper, the psychologist actually wrote the words,) but also confirmed the ADD.  I'd think anyone who could diagnose AS could (and should!) be checking for co-morbid conditions.  Asperger's and other forms of autism may not have a direct medicinal treatment, but other conditions very well may, and if reducing or eliminating symptoms of those comorbid conditions leads to better management of ASD symptoms...what doctor with half a brain wouldn't look at that???

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Scott

I've been looking to get multiple ones diagnosed, especially in the last few years. I believe I have undiagnosed:

  • dyspraxia
  • social anxiety
  • generalised anxiety
  • dysgraphia

and that's just the ones I know for certain.

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RiRi

Scott, I read somewhere that if you have AS that you can't be diagnosed with social anxiety, at least not in the same assessment as AS accounts for social anxiety. I think I might have dyspraxia as well, but I need to look into it. So far I think I have: ASD, Dyslexia, Depression, ADHD. It's not a definite list though.

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Dont fit in on here

Ive heard of Genaralised anxiety along with AS not sure about social anxiety though

I have some anixety i have been diagnosed with i see, it a type of anxiety that happens when i cant tell whats going to happen

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RiRi

Yeah, I think generalized anxiety can be diagnosed along with AS/ASD, it's social anxiety which I've read somewhere that it's accounted for in the AS/ASD diagnosis, could be wrong though as I've read about this not too recent. 

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Scott

Really? Social anxiety is counted with AS?

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RiRi

I knew I had read it somewhere, but it could be incorrect as it says that it was based on the DSM-IV.
 
 "The DSM-IV criteria stated that an individual cannot receive a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder if their symptoms are better accounted for by one of the autism spectrum disorders such as autism and Asperger syndrome"

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King_oni

I got my ADD diagnosis with my Asperger's... like it was a 2 for 1 sale, lol.

 

I did get tested for more than just Asperger's, so that's how one goes about it I guess. My therapist found I showed traits for ADHD so I had to fill in questionaires and such for that as well. Add in that a lot of my tests ended up inconclusive enough to just leave me out of a handful of other disorders for further investigation. Guess there's a threshold in how much you appear to be on certain spectrums for them to look into it.

 

But the diagnosis process here was a bit odd anyway I suppose. I had sessions with a general psychologist first and he referred me to see what exactly was going on. So in a sense the one who diagnosed me, already knew what to look for. All in all it was process with sessions going from march till september with the general one and then from october to january with the specialist. Still... 8 sessions of 1 hour with one guy, then easily 8 hours of testing and interviews with the other lady.

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Nesf

I really don't know how you would go about getting diagnosed with a comorbid condition. I assume you'd have to arrange it through your GP, or you may be able to get a private diagnosis from a psychologist or psychiatrist. I also tick quite a few boxes for a number of comordid conditions, especially ADD, which I can relate to and of which have many traits. I once asked my GP about this. She said that adults weren't diagnosed with this, but I know this isn't true.

 

My impression is that most people with comordid conditions are diagnosed with them before they are diagnosed with AS, because AS isn't picked up on at the time of being assessed. I rarely hear of people being diagnosed with them after an AS diagnosis. I think that this is because there is a lot of overlap between AS(D) and a number of other conditions, particularly dyspraxia, AD(H)D, OCD, etc. and they consider AS an umbrella diagnosis which includes a lot of traits from the comorbids, a diagnosis which trumps all the others. In some cases there's significant overlap, and it's difficult to tell where one diagnosis starts and another one stops. Also, where do you draw the line? As I mentioned above, I have many ADD traits. But these traits are also common to those with AS. So when do those symptoms stop being a part of the AS diagnosis and become a separate ADD diagnosis? The same applies to dyspraxia - difficulties with gross and fine motor coordination are symptoms of both dyspraxia and AS. How does one distinguish between them? Perhaps the degree to which they affect your life? Personally, I have some mild motor coordination difficulties, but normal hand to eye coordination, so while I will never learn to play a musical instrument, dance or type very fast, I'll always find it hard to use the touch pad on my phone and sometimes have difficulties with keys, buttons and zips, I can play tennis (not well, but I can), thread a needle (just) and drive a car. So I don't have the full range of symptoms and I can't say that they significantly affect my life, so it wouldn't be appropiate to give me a dyspraxia diagnosis.

 

However, I see no reason why you shouldn't receive a diagnosis of an anxiety disorder. These are treatable and if you have one, it's appropiate that you be diagnosed so you can receive treatment.

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Dont fit in on here

I got my ADD diagnosis with my Asperger's... like it was a 2 for 1 sale, lol.

 

I did get tested for more than just Asperger's, so that's how one goes about it I guess. My therapist found I showed traits for ADHD so I had to fill in questionaires and such for that as well. Add in that a lot of my tests ended up inconclusive enough to just leave me out of a handful of other disorders for further investigation. Guess there's a threshold in how much you appear to be on certain spectrums for them to look into it.

 

But the diagnosis process here was a bit odd anyway I suppose. I had sessions with a general psychologist first and he referred me to see what exactly was going on. So in a sense the one who diagnosed me, already knew what to look for. All in all it was process with sessions going from march till september with the general one and then from october to january with the specialist. Still... 8 sessions of 1 hour with one guy, then easily 8 hours of testing and interviews with the other lady.

Add is adhd but without the hyperactive impulsive traits

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Muzical

Add is adhd but without the hyperactive impulsive traits

 

Sadly, the DSM-V no longer cares about this key difference.  Now, it's just ADHD-PI (primarily inattentive.)  So even though the H is a lie in that case, the APA insists.  Can't stand the freaking APA...

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Scott

that's something I definitely bring up to my GP next time I see him. We've got a good rapport, so we will definitely get somewhere.

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RiRi

Sadly, the DSM-V no longer cares about this key difference.  Now, it's just ADHD-PI (primarily inattentive.)  So even though the H is a lie in that case, the APA insists.  Can't stand the freaking APA...

Oh, I didn't know about this.

 

I wonder why people aren't diagnosed with everything when they first go to get diagnosed. I get that at the beginning some psychologists might think a person has depression and not think the person has AS, but later on, I don't get why some people only get diagnosed with AS and not AS along with depression or other conditions such as anxiety? Would it be because some psychologists don't specialize in all the conditions?

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Nesf

Oh, I didn't know about this.

 

I wonder why people aren't diagnosed with everything when they first go to get diagnosed. I get that at the beginning some psychologists might think a person has depression and not think the person has AS, but later on, I don't get why some people only get diagnosed with AS and not AS along with depression or other conditions such as anxiety? Would it be because some psychologists don't specialize in all the conditions?

When I was diagnosed, I also received a diagnosis of depression. I was only scheduled for a diagnostic assessment for AS, a DISCO interview, and the time allotted was enough for the DISCO but not for any other kind of assessment. I would need to have another separate assessment for another condition. However, I think that he was looking out for signs of other conditions. He mentioned in the report something I said in the interview as being indicative of OCD, but concluded that it was more an aspie tendency to get tied up with details. I think he needed to diagnose with with depression during the same session because it was urgent and needed treatment.

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CrohnicallyAwkward

Oh, I didn't know about this.

 

I wonder why people aren't diagnosed with everything when they first go to get diagnosed. I get that at the beginning some psychologists might think a person has depression and not think the person has AS, but later on, I don't get why some people only get diagnosed with AS and not AS along with depression or other conditions such as anxiety? Would it be because some psychologists don't specialize in all the conditions?

I think it's because it's hard to separate the conditions sometimes. And a diagnosis of AS can include some things like depression and anxiety- I was originally diagnosed with depression ad anxiety but when I got my AS diagnosis the others were removed. The AS fully explains the symptoms of depression and anxiety I have, and making adjustments for the AS eases the anxiety, there is no need for a separate diagnosis.

However, you could be diagnosed with AS first, but find that some things don't respond to making adjustments, and end up with another diagnosis like OCD or ADHD, that the doctor originally didn't diagnose you with because (s)he thought it was just a symptom of AS.

I hope that makes sense!

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Scott

I forgot to update here recently, but I went to my GP on Thursday last week, and after some speaking about co-morbid conditions, the topic of dyspraxia came up. Since I did my research on possible co-morbid conditions, I felt I very strongly matched with dyspraxia. And lo and behold, after a few cursory questions, my GP gave me a clinical diagnosis of dyspraxia right there and then! Now I know for certain! :D

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RiRi

I forgot to update here recently, but I went to my GP on Thursday last week, and after some speaking about co-morbid conditions, the topic of dyspraxia came up. Since I did my research on possible co-morbid conditions, I felt I very strongly matched with dyspraxia. And lo and behold, after a few cursory questions, my GP gave me a clinical diagnosis of dyspraxia right there and then! Now I know for certain! :D

That's great! :) Your GP is allowed to give a dyspraxia diagnosis? Did you ask about the social anxiety being accounted for with ASD?

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Scott

I found out that social anxiety was accounted for anyway, so that was a non-issue. And yeah, he's allowed to give clinical diagnoses. :)

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AspieFox

Just had a appointment with a expert clinical psychologist. She told me she couldn't give me a diagnosis on the day and told me 'inconclusive', despite my tests being all in the AS range. I need to come back again though, for another appointment. She wants to get some info from my ex too. My school reports give the wrong impression because I hid my differences. My family member at the appointment was intent on dismissing any AS traits I actually know I had as a child (but back then, I didn't express myself and tried to hide them instead).

She said I could have ADHD and just be 'gifted' rather than AS(!?).

I prematurely accepted myself to be on the Autistic Spectrum for the last half a year. Now it feels like a part of me is about to die. It might sound stupid but I'm feeling depressed. Feeling down. Lack of interest in anything since that day.

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AspieFox

...sorry, juat re-read the topic: so I suppose rather than comorbid, my clinician aims to diagnose any related or overlap conditions with or without an Asperger's diagnosis. The clinic deals with both AS and ADHD. So some clinicians cover comorbodity, during the AS process.

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PandaPrincess

@AveApollo I think that this commonly happens when people go get diagnosed.  The AS is often misdiagnosed as something else, such as ADHD or social anxiety, and oftentimes, in women, it can be misdiagnosed as borderline personality disorder instead.  I say if that doesn't work out, then try to get a second opinion.  

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AspieFox
47 minutes ago, PandaPrincess said:

@AveApollo I think that this commonly happens when people go get diagnosed.  The AS is often misdiagnosed as something else, such as ADHD or social anxiety, and oftentimes, in women, it can be misdiagnosed as borderline personality disorder instead.  I say if that doesn't work out, then try to get a second opinion.  

Thanks, I agree. I'm just worried because this clinician is one of the world leading experts, so if she eventually rules out AS, then I really will feel disheartened and perhaps have to go to a private clinic one day in the distant future when I have a spare £1000 (probably never *dejected lol!).

She seems quiet old fashioned and inflexible - I feel that if you don't have typical school reports pointing to classic/stereotyped AS, along with a parent that confirms that, then you'll get ruled out by her. I can definitely see how women can be brushed aside by her, because of the tendency for females to want to fit in etc. Basically, my profile and history is more typical of a female Aspie. Also (not wanting to be arrogant), I have a psych-tested 'gifted range' high IQ and I think male or female, you can quickly learn how to interact and fake NT by memory when a child.
Sometimes I think high intelligence can make someone mask their symptoms really well to fit in, and they then don't get the diagnosis or 'comorbids' that they actually have and suffer with.

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