Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Willow

      Welcome to the forum!   09/17/2017

      Please come in from the rain and sit by the fire! We're happy you found us and hope you will feel at home here.  
Willow

Do You Ever Worry You Don't Have Aspergers?

Recommended Posts

Bruce

An appointment can suddenly become available, at short notice, due to somebody cancelling it, of course! Hope another one comes up soon, that you can make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Willow

Oh no! It's a shame you couldn't have set up a Skype call over the Internet!

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sofi

Yes, that's a shame, hopefully another time can be arranged with more notice to actually get in the country on time! 

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toran

<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="Nesf" data-cid="19825" data-time="1369412504"><p>

I don't know what I was down for, I wasn't expecting it so soon, and I was expecting a few weeks notice like I had with the private assessment. I think it could have been a screening or something. It's frustating that I didn't get to talk to them.</p></blockquote>

I can well understand that do you think it would do you any good to ring them and try to sort something out for when you get back so your not at the end of a long que.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt G

As someone that has no official diagnosis, the attitude that I and my parents have is that there's obviously a few loose wires somewhere and if it's not Aspergers/autism then what the hell is it?

 

Had one attempt at getting an official diagnosis and that hit a brick wall but nowadays most people accept me as having Aspergers/autism and I've not seen anyone come up with a sane argument why I don't have it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bristlenose

I guess this is more aimed at those who don't have a diagnosis. And really, my first question would be, how did you come to the conclusion that you have Aspergers? Then from that, are you getting a formal diagnosis? And if so, what will happen if they say you don't have Aspergers?

I did the reverse. Only became reasonably confident I had Asperger's at 33 after first encountering other Aspies on YouTube, but had been formally diagnosed at 17.

In the intervening years, I'd long worried I didn't really have AS and was some sort of imposter, because I didn't feel "autistic" enough for AS to be the correct explanation for my behaviour. Asperger's wasn't considered in the years prior to diagnosis - it was less recognised at the time (mid-90s) and my issues had previously been attributed to OCD. Didn't have much of a sense of what Asperger's was beyond a pamphlet description or what autism was outside the movie Rain Man, and growing up as merely an oddball then suddenly catching Asperger's at 17 made the thing seem a bit weak. The whole process was more a matter for my parents - I resented being dragged along to psychs and just wanted to be left alone.

Nowadays, people are only a few clicks away from vivid descriptions of Aspies' idiosyncrasies and issues, and it seems to have become relatively common for self-diagnosis to precede formal diagnosis. The way my recent exposure to Aspies online alleviated my own doubts raises the question of whether that or the formal diagnosis is more important in affirming one's self-identification as an Aspie. One thing I've come to appreciate is how the gulf betwen the way a person perceives themself and the way they're perceived by others applies here. For example, in my interaction with a real estate agent a few years ago, I thought I'd come across, at worst, as a quiet/shy NT, but later learned through happenstance she'd seen right through to my AS (she told another person I was "like a little Rain Man"). That sort of thing illustrates the significance of outside perspectives, and that's what a formal diagnosis can help with - it involves informed observations from the outside looking in - something you can't do yourself.

 

But for those of you with a diagnosis, do you ever worry that it is a mis diagnosis? Either because you just feel it doesn't fit, or because you sometimes look at how other people are and worry that you're coping better so maybe you don't have it?

The differences in Aspies' quirks and levels of coping are interesting, but aren't the main worry. It's a bit of a mix between seeing others as "more Aspie" than me in some respects and "more normal" in others. There are however those who view Asperger's with outright suspicion, and exposure to their perspectives tended to reinforce my doubts about identifying as an Aspie. They see it as bringing the "weird guy" or "social retard" under the umbrella of disability, and serving as an excuse for misfits to elect to drop out of society, collect welfare and play World of Warcraft all day. Or it's seen as someone trying to stake a claim to being different or special, and the NT world generally doesn't like that. Then there's the rapid growth in the ASD rate, which has led to a debate over whether it's become a fad diagnosis. And the DSM V eliminating the Asperger's label.

So, there's this pull between forces that make me feel more secure identifying as an Aspie, and those that undermine it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nesf

I did the reverse. Only became reasonably confident I had Asperger's at 33 after first encountering other Aspies on YouTube, but had been formally diagnosed at 17.

In the intervening years, I'd long worried I didn't really have AS and was some sort of imposter, because I didn't feel "autistic" enough for AS to be the correct explanation for my behaviour. Asperger's wasn't considered in the years prior to diagnosis - it was less recognised at the time (mid-90s) and my issues had previously been attributed to OCD. Didn't have much of a sense of what Asperger's was beyond a pamphlet description or what autism was outside the movie Rain Man, and growing up as merely an oddball then suddenly catching Asperger's at 17 made the thing seem a bit weak. The whole process was more a matter for my parents - I resented being dragged along to psychs and just wanted to be left alone.

Nowadays, people are only a few clicks away from vivid descriptions of Aspies' idiosyncrasies and issues, and it seems to have become relatively common for self-diagnosis to precede formal diagnosis. The way my recent exposure to Aspies online alleviated my own doubts raises the question of whether that or the formal diagnosis is more important in affirming one's self-identification as an Aspie. One thing I've come to appreciate is how the gulf betwen the way a person perceives themself and the way they're perceived by others applies here. For example, in my interaction with a real estate agent a few years ago, I thought I'd come across, at worst, as a quiet/shy NT, but later learned through happenstance she'd seen right through to my AS (she told another person I was "like a little Rain Man"). That sort of thing illustrates the significance of outside perspectives, and that's what a formal diagnosis can help with - it involves informed observations from the outside looking in - something you can't do yourself.

 

The differences in Aspies' quirks and levels of coping are interesting, but aren't the main worry. It's a bit of a mix between seeing others as "more Aspie" than me in some respects and "more normal" in others. There are however those who view Asperger's with outright suspicion, and exposure to their perspectives tended to reinforce my doubts about identifying as an Aspie. They see it as bringing the "weird guy" or "social retard" under the umbrella of disability, and serving as an excuse for misfits to elect to drop out of society, collect welfare and play World of Warcraft all day. Or it's seen as someone trying to stake a claim to being different or special, and the NT world generally doesn't like that. Then there's the rapid growth in the ASD rate, which has led to a debate over whether it's become a fad diagnosis. And the DSM V eliminating the Asperger's label.

So, there's this pull between forces that make me feel more secure identifying as an Aspie, and those that undermine it.

It's certainly true that our perception of ourselves is entirely different to how others see us. People are rarely honest enough to tell you what they really think, and might tell you white lies in order not to hurt your feelings. When I first researched AS I saw a lot of documentaries featuring quite extreme examples, and although I recognised the traits in me I didn't know if they were enough or pronounced enough to meet the diagnosis criteria. It was only when I lost my job that I realised that actually my problems were quite severe an that I needed help, so decided to get assessed.

 

I haven't a clue what people think of me, but there are a couple of telling instants:

 

Ar Uni I asked a friend if she thought I was weird. She hesitated to answer, and eventually said "you walk a bit funny" so I asked "how do you mean" snd she said "well you're a bit clumsy"  That's not the answer I was expecting.

 

On my 30th birthday, my sister sent me a birthday card with "to my best friend" except she had crossed out "best" and written "weirdest" That didn't bother me because i liked being a bit different or weird.

 

After my diagnosis I received a report. Shortly into the session the neuropsychiatrist had said that he thought I was a mild case, but when the report came it said "moderate" I was very surprised at this and said to my mum, "moderate?! I've had a lot of issues but I had considered myself "mild" rather than 'moderate' and she replied "Well, you're definitely not mild!"

 

At work after being told that my contract wasn't going to be renewed, I confided in a work colleague I was a bit closer to and told him I thought I might have AS. His exact words were "It's good that you realise what's wrong so you can get help" which indicates to me that he had thought that there was something not right about me.

 

I don't ever tell anyone about my diagnosis so I don't worry so much about people's perception of it and how that will affect me. For me it's a very personal matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bristlenose

Ar Uni I asked a friend if she thought I was weird. She hesitated to answer, and eventually said "you walk a bit funny" so I asked "how do you mean" snd she said "well you're a bit clumsy"  That's not the answer I was expecting.

 

Strangely enough, that's kind of how I ended up here. Mid last year, I was at an apartment with my dad and had set my camera up in the corner of a room while testing something, which I promptly forgot about, and it captured us moving about. I was watching this footage months later while sorting my camera folder, and noticed while my dad was walking like a "normal" person, I had an awkward gait. It was very surprising - like, "wait a minute - I don't move like that, do I?"

Since I rarely get such a glimpse of myself from the outside looking in, I'd never realised it and no one had told me. It piqued my interest, and I guess that's what led me to view other Aspies for the first time on YouTube, and naturally, other aspects resonated. Looking back now at my diagnosis from 1996, it says "he has the motor awkwardness aspect of the syndrome", which I would've dismissed as an exaggeration or awkwardness in the situation of being examined.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nesf

Strangely enough, that's kind of how I ended up here. Mid last year, I was at an apartment with my dad and had set my camera up in the corner of a room while testing something, which I promptly forgot about, and it captured us moving about. I was watching this footage months later while sorting my camera folder, and noticed while my dad was walking like a "normal" person, I had an awkward gait. It was very surprising - like, "wait a minute - I don't move like that, do I?"

Since I rarely get such a glimpse of myself from the outside looking in, I'd never realised it and no one had told me. It piqued my interest, and I guess that's what led me to view other Aspies for the first time on YouTube, and naturally, other aspects resonated. Looking back now at my diagnosis from 1996, it says "he has the motor awkwardness aspect of the syndrome", which I would've dismissed as an exaggeration or awkwardness in the situation of being examined.

I think that in my case it's not very pronounced or has largely disappeared - the specialist who diagnosed me said I didn't have any obvious clumsiness when walking, though he only saw me walk into his office, I don't know if you can really judge a person from that. What my friend may have meant is that I don't walk in a feminine way, I've always been a bit tomboy-ish. If I try to run or walk fast I do have a bit of clumsiness and was never any good at sport, and don't ask me to dance or your toes may well be very sore afterwards :)

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whoknows

I guess this is more aimed at those who don't have a diagnosis. And really, my first question would be, how did you come to the conclusion that you have Aspergers? Then from that, are you getting a formal diagnosis? And if so, what will happen if they say you don't have Aspergers? 

But for those of you with a diagnosis, do you ever worry that it is a mis diagnosis? Either because you just feel it doesn't fit, or because you sometimes look at how other people are and worry that you're coping better so maybe you don't have it?

I sometimes think that I've 'grown out' of Aspergers, until I realise that I've just learnt to cope better as I've gotten older. Though, mostly that's due to isolating myself in my home with Chris, or just on my own when he's at work. And as for going out, I rarely get out of my car unless it's somewhere I know won't be busy, or I'm familiar with it.

Watch this. This might help you make your day.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Richard

Before I was diagnosed and I was waiting to find out I was worried that I might not have it because I so desperately wanted an answer for many aspects of my life and Aspergers would provide that answer. I have wondered if the diagnosis is correct though especially when I go through really good successful periods in my life (when depression and anxiety are not holding me back). That being said most of the time I am fairly sure that I am on the austisic spectrum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nesf

Before I was diagnosed and I was waiting to find out I was worried that I might not have it because I so desperately wanted an answer for many aspects of my life and Aspergers would provide that answer. I have wondered if the diagnosis is correct though especially when I go through really good successful periods in my life (when depression and anxiety are not holding me back). That being said most of the time I am fairly sure that I am on the austisic spectrum.

I can relate to this, I'm like this do - on better days i wonder about the diagnosis, then a bad day comes along, or I remember all the events that lead me to the conclusion and that dispels all doubt.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xmas

I had an appointment with a psychiatrist today. She asked me lots of questions about myself, about my childhood and growing up. She asked me about my schooling, my education and my employment history. She asked me about my family life and the relationships I have with my close family, she asked about my social life and how I interact with friends and colleagues, and also about my relationship history. She went into detail about my likes and dislikes, how I view the world around me and how I communicate with other people.

 

She said she had been assessing me on three categories of behaviour - I don't really know enough about this side of things but I believe she may have been using the DISCO method of assessment.

 

Her conclusions were that I met two out of the three categories, and that although I did display some Asperger's traits, and she did feel that I was on the spectrum, she thought it was not significant enough to give me a formal diagnosis. She decided instead to diagnose me with Social Anxiety Disorder.

 

She recommended that I see an Occupational Health Advisor who would be able to help and advise me in work. This isn't quite the outcome I had envisaged, but it will have to do and I must now look for a way forward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sofi

I had an appointment with a psychiatrist today. She asked me lots of questions about myself, about my childhood and growing up. She asked me about my schooling, my education and my employment history. She asked me about my family life and the relationships I have with my close family, she asked about my social life and how I interact with friends and colleagues, and also about my relationship history. She went into detail about my likes and dislikes, how I view the world around me and how I communicate with other people.

 

She said she had been assessing me on three categories of behaviour - I don't really know enough about this side of things but I believe she may have been using the DISCO method of assessment.

 

Her conclusions were that I met two out of the three categories, and that although I did display some Asperger's traits, and she did feel that I was on the spectrum, she thought it was not significant enough to give me a formal diagnosis. She decided instead to diagnose me with Social Anxiety Disorder.

 

She recommended that I see an Occupational Health Advisor who would be able to help and advise me in work. This isn't quite the outcome I had envisaged, but it will have to do and I must now look for a way forward.

 

Oh okay. I understand, well done on completing the interview. At least you have got this diagnosis, even although it wasn't quite what you were expecting and you might have been more suspecting an ASD diagnosis. You still know you have those traits and can learn to cope with them too, such as on here!

It was very good you were recommended that Health Advisor, I think they will help a lot with your work :) I hope things can, now, become easier for you.  

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toran

At least you have a diagnosis but whatever they say its you who have to live the same way as before.

She may be right or not but as long as the treatment works for you does it matter.

There are so many cross overs between different conditions and they are only human after all.

I believe I have aspergers because of my history but unless your young and have been assessed from an early age then they have to take your word or from people who know you.

My mother wont believe I have it whatever anyone says because her little boy could not have a mental illness even though im 47 and a catalog of events that match the spectrum.

It will never be easy for us late cases as they see you cope to a degree but dont feel the anger frustrations and difficultys it takes just to get by one day at a time.

Im pleased there is more understanding for young children but us oldies are always going to get a tough deal.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xmas

Oh okay. I understand, well done on completing the interview. At least you have got this diagnosis, even although it wasn't quite what you were expecting and you might have been more suspecting an ASD diagnosis. You still know you have those traits and can learn to cope with them too, such as on here!

It was very good you were recommended that Health Advisor, I think they will help a lot with your work :) I hope things can, now, become easier for you.  

Thank-you Sofi for your support these past few weeks - or is it months! - it is very much appreciated because I had so much to learn and I certainly found help on this forum. I have to see how things go now that I am back in work. Hopefully I will get some help to cope now that I have had this diagnosis.

At least you have a diagnosis but whatever they say its you who have to live the same way as before.

She may be right or not but as long as the treatment works for you does it matter.

There are so many cross overs between different conditions and they are only human after all.

I believe I have aspergers because of my history but unless your young and have been assessed from an early age then they have to take your word or from people who know you.

My mother wont believe I have it whatever anyone says because her little boy could not have a mental illness even though im 47 and a catalog of events that match the spectrum.

It will never be easy for us late cases as they see you cope to a degree but dont feel the anger frustrations and difficultys it takes just to get by one day at a time.

Im pleased there is more understanding for young children but us oldies are always going to get a tough deal.

Thank-you Toran, now that I have had a few hours to mull it over, I realise I am not too bothered about whether the diagnosis is AS, ASD or as it turns out Social Anxiety Disorder. I agree with what you say, that what matters is as long as the treatment works.

 

Now that I have had this diagnosis, I have told my mother about it. Up until now I had not said anything, except the reason why I had been off work. But as it happens she is not too surprised that I have had this diagnosis. But as I said to Sofi, I appreciate all the help and advice I have had here and am so happy I have made some friends here.

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sofi

Thank-you Sofi for your support these past few weeks - or is it months! - it is very much appreciated because I had so much to learn and I certainly found help on this forum. I have to see how things go now that I am back in work. Hopefully I will get some help to cope now that I have had this diagnosis.

 

I think it may be months now! I am really glad you joined this forum and I like talking to you, you have made me smile many times  :D You can definitely learn a lot on here too and everyone will support you. Hopefully things do start to improve with work now for you.

The thing I have realised about diagnoses now is that, at the end of the day, you are whatever you are. Everyone has things which they struggle with and then the things they are good at and they are just them. Diagnosis will help with services you need to cope with certain things, but you are just you. You have some ASD traits - that's part of your personality too, everything makes up you! I like my diagnosis that I've had, it just makes me, me! 

  • Helpful 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nesf

I had an appointment with a psychiatrist today. She asked me lots of questions about myself, about my childhood and growing up. She asked me about my schooling, my education and my employment history. She asked me about my family life and the relationships I have with my close family, she asked about my social life and how I interact with friends and colleagues, and also about my relationship history. She went into detail about my likes and dislikes, how I view the world around me and how I communicate with other people.

 

She said she had been assessing me on three categories of behaviour - I don't really know enough about this side of things but I believe she may have been using the DISCO method of assessment.

 

Her conclusions were that I met two out of the three categories, and that although I did display some Asperger's traits, and she did feel that I was on the spectrum, she thought it was not significant enough to give me a formal diagnosis. She decided instead to diagnose me with Social Anxiety Disorder.

 

She recommended that I see an Occupational Health Advisor who would be able to help and advise me in work. This isn't quite the outcome I had envisaged, but it will have to do and I must now look for a way forward.

It may not be what you were expecting but at least you know where you stand, and having occupational therapy should help with the problems at work. I also received a diagnosis of Social Phobia (without my knowledge) back in 1991, before AS was possible as a diagnosis. As Sofi says, you're still the same person, whatever your diagnosis :)

 

I think it may be months now! I am really glad you joined this forum and I like talking to you, you have made me smile many times  :D You can definitely learn a lot on here too and everyone will support you. Hopefully things do start to improve with work now for you.

The thing I have realised about diagnoses now is that, at the end of the day, you are whatever you are. Everyone has things which they struggle with and then the things they are good at and they are just them. Diagnosis will help with services you need to cope with certain things, but you are just you. You have some ASD traits - that's part of your personality too, everything makes up you! I like my diagnosis that I've had, it just makes me, me! 

I completely agree with this, a diagnosis may a formal recognition of of a condition, but it doesn't change who you are, you're still the same person. On October 14 I was Nesf without a diagnosis and on 15th October Nesf with a diagnosis. Life goes on... the purpose of the diagnosis is to allow you to get access to counselling, therapy, services or benefits, but you are still you!

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toran

There wont be many benefits for anyone on autistic spectrum soon.

Im still not convinced that they wont say people who have aspergers are on the bottom end of the scales thoughs with sever autism at the top. Then because of your low rating you will only endup of the benefits payments.

Which because of unification benefits with the new system meaning lower payment zxx§

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nesf

I've been worrying about this s lot recently. I'm beginning to have doubts over the validity of my assessment and diagnosis because it seems to me a bit too simple, a bit too easy. Nearly all other people diagnosed with AS underwent several interviews, and testing, before a diagnosis was confirmed. All I had was a session with the neuropsychiatrist lasting about 1 hour 15 minutes, no testing, nothing, and it didn't feel like an assessment, just a whole load of questions. About 20 minutes into it he told me that he felt that I was a mild case of AS. How can he know after just 20 minutes? Can the diagnosis be valid without these cognitive or IQ tests?

 

The neuropsychiatrist seemed to be very highly qualified and experienced, but I don't think he specialises in ASD (though I saw him once on TV talking about an AS-related issue). Also, this was a privately funded assessment, and I'm worried that since we were paying him he might have been influenced into giving me this diagnosis, when in fact all i have is other problems like Depression and an anxiety disorder. I wish I could have waited for an NHS diagnosis, so I could undergo the full range of tests and be sure about it, and not have these feelings of doubt. I wonder if I should try and get a second opinion.  I need validation and reassurance..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wren

I used to try and prove to myself that I wasn't an Aspie...and failed. I am more often worried that I have some traits that aren't Aspie and then worry that I am really some psycho murderer girl or something. Also, I have never met anyone on the spectrum (not that I know of) so I have nothing to compare myself to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
King_oni

If I wouldn't have the label Aspergers, I would have a list of other conditions, take meds for it, probably make me more confused and then they'd figure out "well, those meds aren't beneficial". It's actually where I wonder if they just tacked the Asperger's label on me just to get it over with. Don't get me wrong, I do qualify to be on the spectrum, by far, but it's just that with me there's so much things going on, that it's probably easier for them (the psychiatrists) to assume it's an anomaly linked to AS rather than something on it's own.

 

I remember that before my diagnosis, years ago, I had a talk with a psychologist whom I was seeing because of my depression at the time. That eventually opened up that my depression was the effect of a lot of things that went wrong in my life and pretty hitting a dead end in life. Further talks showed that I had severe schizotypal traits, some narcissic personality traits, I was antisocial on top of the fact that my general understanding of "the world" was rather off. And focussing on those traits those coincided with what is common for people on the autism spectrum. It just came down to testing if I either had a list of personality disorders or if I in fact have autism. Asperger's seemed more spot on because of the rather high functioning nature of myself (but I guess that's debateable, I see many aspies who are way more functioning than me). What I have discovered is that the psychologists weren't wrong at all and inadvertently I threw them a curveball. It's because of my AS, that I developed personality disorders for a big part.

 

I don't worry that I fall of the scale, since I'm quite sure I'll end up somewhere else. To me it would just be relabelling but I'll still end up in the same filecabinet labeled "not normal".

 

If anything I'd like more advancements in neuroscience and an EEG scan to get it over with. Since the APA (those lovely folks who are responsible for the DSM books and are holding shares of pharmaceutical companies) are getting more and more of a bad rep by the NIMH, who claim that neuroscience is more accurate that "the interpretation of someones behaviour". In general it's an interesting thought, since it could potentially turn autism into a clinical condition rather than a psychological.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pinky and his brain

I've been worrying about this s lot recently. I'm beginning to have doubts over the validity of my assessment and diagnosis because it seems to me a bit too simple, a bit too easy. Nearly all other people diagnosed with AS underwent several interviews, and testing, before a diagnosis was confirmed. All I had was a session with the neuropsychiatrist lasting about 1 hour 15 minutes, no testing, nothing, and it didn't feel like an assessment, just a whole load of questions. About 20 minutes into it he told me that he felt that I was a mild case of AS. How can he know after just 20 minutes? Can the diagnosis be valid without these cognitive or IQ tests?

 

The neuropsychiatrist seemed to be very highly qualified and experienced, but I don't think he specialises in ASD (though I saw him once on TV talking about an AS-related issue). Also, this was a privately funded assessment, and I'm worried that since we were paying him he might have been influenced into giving me this diagnosis, when in fact all i have is other problems like Depression and an anxiety disorder. I wish I could have waited for an NHS diagnosis, so I could undergo the full range of tests and be sure about it, and not have these feelings of doubt. I wonder if I should try and get a second opinion.  I need validation and reassurance..

 

From what I have read in your posts, you don't have to worry. You fit the diagnosis perfectly. :)

 

You have to keep in mind, that the time they spend on diagnosing a grown up person is much less than the time they spend on a child or teenager. The reason for that is, that grown ups can no longer be changed. They are what they are. But children can still be helped in many ways, that will improve their chances of a better life. Another problem with children that consumes more time is, that they don't have the experience to explain their feeling and problems as clearly as a grown up. And therefore psychiatrists need more time to be sure of their diagnosis.

 

 

P.S. I was also diagnosed as a grown up. It didn't take much time. I think it was 2 meetings of 1 hour each. They made some test and asked a lot of questions.

Edited by Pinky and his brain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toran

From what I have read in your posts, you don't have to worry. You fit the diagnosis perfectly. :)

 

You have to keep in mind, that the time they spend on diagnosing 4a grown up person is much less than the time they spend on a child or teenager. The reason for that is, that grown ups can no longer be changed. They are what they are. But children can still be helped in many ways, that will improve their chances of a better life. Another problem with children that consumes more time is, that they don't have the experience to explain their feeling and problems as clearly as a grown up. And therefore psychiatrists need more time to be sure of their diagnosis.

 

 

P.S. I was also diagnosed as a grown up. It didn't take much time. I think it was 2 meetings of 1 hour each. They made some test and asked a lot of questions.

That was the same for me two meetings of the same time but they also wanted to speak with my partner and a written statement from my mother.

I agree with pinky on why there is a difference in the testing because the younger you are the more chance there is on helping them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
grahamguitarman

I too got diagnosed with social phobia disorder back in the late nineties.  There simply weren't the diagnostic facilities for adult aspergers diagnosis back then, and most medical professionals were ignorant of its existence as a problem anyway.  Because of that diagnosis and my unfortunate history of being violently abused by my father I never looked any further for an explanation of my weirdness.  I was shy and an eccentric artist and that was fine by me.

 

But then while my son was being diagnosed for Autism the paediatric psychologist commented on various traits I had myself - such as walking on tiptoes, lack of eye contact etc.  At first I just shrugged it off and carried on, but it kept nagging at me, making me question who I was - so I decided to find out once and for all and asked for a diagnosis.  

 

My interview was scheduled for two hours at the sheffield Aspergers service, but after one hour the specialist was convinced I had it anyway.  I was diagnosed in February of this year (at the age of 50), and still occasionally doubt my diagnosis, but then something happens and I realise that I am indeed ASD.  

 

Those forms you fill in before hand are an important part of the process - they give the psychologist advance information to assess beforehand, reducing the complexity of the interview itself.  They want you to be as relaxed as possible at the interview, so the less questions they have to ask on the day, the better (I was already worn out after one hour).  The forms filled out by your parents are especially important as they give vital information about the key stages of your development.  My mother also came with me to the interview, which helped because he was able to ask her questions.

 

Also ASD specialists don't use the written tests etc, as they are more designed for non Autism professionals to asses whether they think the patient needs referring to a specialist who can explore more specifically for autism.  It is in fact a myth that it requires a range of tests to diagnose ASD, even on the NHS it only requires a one to two hour interview for adults.  (For my son it took a bit longer because they wanted to observe him at school to see his behaviour patterns there).

 

The specialist can tell if you have autism just by observing your reactions to their questions, and by other behavioural observations.  For example he deliberately left a pile of papers at an awkward angle on the table so he could observe my reaction.  When he could see that I kept glancing at them he asked if it bothered me, which of course it did.  I think it was the observation of my discomfort that held the most weight though, not my answer as to why it made me uncomfortable.  

 

Getting a diagnosis after just one hour long interview can seem a bit anticlimactic, or even not thorough enough.  But you have to remember that ASD is not a mental illness, it does not have its roots in some childhood event or in the way your parents brought you up.  The long string of sessions normally associated with psychology/psychiatry are designed to get at the root causes of your psychological problem.  If you go to them with a phobia for example it can take weeks of psychotherapy to discover the root cause of that phobia.  

 

ASD on the other hand is something you are simply born with, so searching for some childhood event would be pointless and unnecessarily uncomfortable for the patient!   If you go to see a non Autism Psychiatrist you may well end up having to go to multiple sessions because he is probably looking for some other cause behind the problems (possibly because he wants to rule out any other mental health problem).  An ASD specialist on the other hand is only looking for ASD, they might find other related neuropsychological problems such as ADHD or Dyspraxia, but they are not looking for mental illness.  It really does only take about half an hour of observation for an expert to see the physical signs of ASD, they like to make it a bit longer though to make sure they are not misdiagnosing  B)

 

I was also diagnosed as having co-morbid Dyspraxia and ADHD, which probably surprised me more than the Asperger diagnosis.  It's actually not uncommon to have co-morbid conditions such as ADHD, Dyspraxia and Dyslexia.  And because the symptoms of those conditions are sometimes more behaviourally obvious it's easy to think that they are all that is really wrong with you - again leading to self doubt about your ASD.

 

I wouldn't worry too much about any masking behaviours you have either - they are trained to see through those anyway.  I certainly didn't make any attempt to hide or unhide any behaviours - I wasn't even sure I had ASD, but he was still able to spot my ASD behaviours easily enough.

 

I think that part of the problem of self perception with ASD, is that we are born with it so don't know any other way of being.  So when your symptoms seem normal and everyday to you, it is again easy to doubt your diagnosis.

 

As I lost my upper frequency hearing I noticed because there were things that I could no longer hear in my favourite songs.  Yet all my life I've been able to hear every single conversation in the room all at once and all at the same volume - and never once realised that this was not normal!  NT's can only really hear the one person they are talking to - their brains filter out all the other conversations!  With ASD I've never known any other existence so how do I judge how autistic I really am.  Being aware that it is not normal to hear everything at once is a constant reminder to me now that I am indeed Autistic! 

 

Anyway, sorry for rambling on for so long - another reminder that I am indeed autistic  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×