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AspieFox

Self doubt and waiting times

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AspieFox

Hi everyone,

I am feeling stressed and worried right now. I have been referred by my GP (after I brought up possible Asperger's, having done the AQ test myself). I have since done the AQ, AAA, EQ tests that were sent to me by CLASS Clinic in Cambridge, UK, after that GP referred me. They now want to see me for an 'informal interview to see if the diagnosis is appropriate'.

I just want to know as soon as possible, because Asperger's seems to fit many aspects of myself and the diagnosis could actually change my life for the better. I've done the AQ, AAA, EQ tests online too, and always test well in to the Aspie range for all. However, there are some aspects that don't really fit the typical profile. Therefore, I am worried that I might not get the diagnosis, and then be stuck wondering again, about why I am so different to everyone.

The wait is agony. I've searched my whole life. I told my GP that I don't express emotion, such as crying at funerals, or responding in the way and in the manner everyone else does at various scenarios, where, apparently my lack of expression or doing the right thing made people upset. I told him how, I usually upset people because I speak direct or because I did or said the wrong thing and don't meant to. I told him that I don't understand why people get upset with the truth or why I am so black and white in thinking compared to everyone else. I always thought I was strange, because I've had OCD symptoms since a child (and received diagnosis 10 years ago, I'm 34 now). But there was always more...why I didn't seem to be accepted in groups or, from school to working life (even when I try hard), why I can't tell if someone is teasing me or being serious (most of the time anyway), why I take things so literally, why I really struggle with change to my environment or life, why people always seem to misunderstand me, and I regularly misunderstand them, the list goes on. 95% of NTs that I have mentioned it to, like friends or the 1 family member that I felt I could mention anything to, brush me off..."ah you are just obsessing and looking for things wrong with you...every one is like that at times...you don't act autistic and you seem really normal" etc is what I get.

I read some old school reports today, and apart from being easily distracted and struggling with new ideas, and apart from the inappropriate calling out and being silly, it seems that I was social to peers and adults. I didn't feel like other children, and felt I was always different, however. Now I feel different to other adults, apart a few Aspies that I've met online. I wanted to fit in and have friends, so I joined in at school, but often made the games up, with my rules and my way, so others used to follow my lead. I also made/make eye contact, although I am never sure how much to make (too much looks like staring, but it's hard to listen and maintain the 'right' level of eye contact at the same time etc). What I am saying is, there are certain things that don't fit a male Aspie child, or adult, but there are also lots that do fit, including over sensitivity to sound and light, etc. I do dominate conversations and struggle with 2-way conversations. I either get really excited and want to tell everything about my favourite topics, or I just think that I know better than others, because I've done the research or can see things from a different angle. (I'm trying to be more accepting of other's views, even if it's hard to understand when they are being illogical or dismissive of my facts and reasoning). Roughly half of discussions are very frustrating and other's seem to misunderstand me. I'm also not interested much, in topics that don't interest me, so I avoid chatting about these things. I also find most people boring, or I'm feeling awkward, so I end up talking.

I suppose that I am worried that I have read too much about Asperger's and I am looking to fit myself into the diagnosis, rather than the diagnosis fitting me. The only way to know is to see this specialist, but I've been waiting for 4 months now.

Are my self-doubts similar to anyone else's?

What was your waiting time for diagnosis (in the UK)?

Are there any Aspies that 'appear' NT (such as make eye contact, try to get involved socially, use body language, have NT friends)? What were your experiences in terms of getting a diagnosis? Did doctors/psychologists doubt you? Did/do you friends and family doubt your diagnosis?

Thanks for reading.

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Mimo
1 hour ago, AveApollo said:

The wait is agony. I've searched my whole life

I completly agree. I'm 33 and was just diagnosed a few months ago. When I first began to realize the correlations between Aspgers and my own experiences I knew I had found the answer. So many things seemed to fit so perfectly but there are also symptoms that don't fit. Every individual with ASD has their own unique set of symptoms.

1 hour ago, AveApollo said:

Are my self-doubts similar to anyone else's?

Yes. I was so scared that the dr would tell me I didn't have ASD! But I knew that I did. Even though I have the diagnosis there are days when I doubt it, days when I wonder if I'm just mimicking the things I've seen or read about. Which leads me too...

1 hour ago, AveApollo said:

Are there any Aspies that 'appear' NT (such as make eye contact, try to get involved socially, use body language, have NT friends)? What were your experiences in terms of getting a diagnosis? Did doctors/psychologists doubt you? Did/do you friends and family doubt your diagnosis?

Yes. I have only shared my diagnosis with my husband, my parents and 2 friends (and a couple drs). My husband and friends are very understanding and have seen my struggles. My parents do not really believe that I have Aspergers. I don't think anyone would really know that I have Aspergers just from talking or working with me. I have 2 sides and I only allow certain people to really see the real me. I shared with both of my friends that I was seeking a diagnosis and after talking about some of the symptoms I experience they both thought I might have Aspergers and were very supportive. I can manage my stress decently for the most part and appear NT at work or in public even though I feel very differently inside. I am in the process of learning to accept myself quirks and stims and all and to just be myself all the time. This is a difficult process for an aspie that has spent over 30 years trying to fit in!

This forum has been such a blessing. I had and continue to have so many questions and being able to ask other aspie's has been the greatest help in understanding Asperger's and what's going on with myself.

I suggest to make a list of the aspie symptoms you struggle with and include specific examples if you can. Add to that your school reports and if your family is willing to contribute add that as well. The preparations helped keep me busy so I didn't become overwhelmed with worry and kept me on track during the visit.  Best of luck to you as you seek diagnosis!

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Nesf
9 hours ago, AveApollo said:

Are my self-doubts similar to anyone else's?

Yes, I felt the same way as you do, because I read a lot about Asperger's and although so many of the symptoms fit, I kept finding odd traits that I don't have or thought I didn't have, or ways in which I was different to others on the spectrum, or that I was too 'high functioning', and that made me worry that I didn't have it and wouldn't be diagnosed. But we are all different, we have all different personalities and backgrounds and life experiences that all go to make the person that we are, so no two people on the spectrum can be the same. Also, the very fact that you are researching it and analysing/worrying about it and all the details of it is a good indication in itself that you may be on the spectrum. I've been on this forum about 3 years now and I have seen many people in a similar position to yourself come to the forum going through the diagnostic procedure and worrying about the diagnosis, and nearly all of them went on to receive their diagnosis.

9 hours ago, AveApollo said:

What was your waiting time for diagnosis (in the UK)?

About 6 weeks, but I was fast-tracked through it by my GP and had a private diagnosis. Waiting times on the NHS can be very long.

10 hours ago, AveApollo said:

Are there any Aspies that 'appear' NT (such as make eye contact, try to get involved socially, use body language, have NT friends)? What were your experiences in terms of getting a diagnosis? Did doctors/psychologists doubt you? Did/do you friends and family doubt your diagnosis?

I can appear NT in that I know what to say in common social situations. I know the script. I know to say hello, to give a little smile, to say please, thank you, goodbye, etc. I have the basic social training, so to say. The thing I find hard is more complex interactions which don't have a set script as such, and you are supposed to know intuitively what the other person is thinking and feeling. I don't pick up on people's moods and emotions intuitively. I don't read between the lines and misinterpret people's intentions. I don't feel the same as other people inside and so I don't act the same way as they do, except as part of a script. I'm also slow to process, everything has to be thought about and analysed, I can't do this in actual live time because it isn't automatic and intuitive. I look at people when talking and can make brief eye contact, but I don't hold it because it feels uncomfortable.

When I was younger, I used to try hard to be social, to find friends, was a bit more outgoing. I did have friends, or people I hung out with, but it was always one at a time. If a third person came along, then my friend and the new person would interact and then bond with each other, and I was left out. Their conversation was natural and could flow, mine never was. I couldn't interact with more than one person at a time. I never belonged to a social group or clique, because I could never interact on that level, and I was a tomboy and never had the same interests as girl groups. Apart from that, I don't process speech very fast and may response is delayed, and that makes it difficult to join in group conversations.

In the 1980s when I was a child with difficulties at school, a teacher suggested to my parents that I may be autistic, but the GP didn't think so because I gave him some eye contact, answered his questions, and had a friend. Later, when I was studying at university, a psychologist diagnosed me with social phobia, but I didn't find out about this until years later. When I learned about Asperger's, I realised that I had traits but I didn't do anything about it at first, until I started to have severe difficulties with my job and with anxiety, I had a burnout, indeed, this seemed to be a pattern emerging with any new job I had, as I always ended up leaving, getting fired, burning out through stress and anxiety. It was then that I started to look at Asperger's again and I realised that this was the underlying cause. I asked my mum whether she thought I had Asperger's and she agreed that I have it, and supported me through the diagnosis. I didn't talk about it to friends, but met up with a couple of people on the spectrum, and they were in agreement that I probably have it. That gave me the impetus to start the diagnostic procedure.

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Harrow

I'm in the same boat. This week I was suppose to start my diagnostic procedure with a specialist, but work intervened so I had to re book. But as to do people have all the symptoms, no personally I don't I have good eye contact and I'm mostly sociable though those two things I learned to be more after practicing all the time. But lots of the other things I do have. 

But for me not getting a diagnoses will also put me back to not understanding myself, because I feel like here is where I belong.

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Kroge

Don't bother trying to match yourself to every characteristic that others have. No two people with autism have the same symptoms, and they don't think or act the same. Autism is a developmental issue and that's all; how it is expressed is extremely variable depending on the individual.

Autism/Asperger's is a developmental issue and is not a personality type.

20 hours ago, AveApollo said:

I suppose that I am worried that I have read too much about Asperger's and I am looking to fit myself into the diagnosis, rather than the diagnosis fitting me.

You obviously have a good level of self-awareness and intelligence to recognise this. Weaker minds often cling to diagnoses and indeed they do make a subconscious and even conscious effort to mirror the symptoms that they are hearing about.

Since you have the intelligence to spot this potential pitfall then I'd say you are probably capable of looking at the general Asperger traits and seeing if any of your behaviours do genuinely match up, whilst recognizing that absolutely everyone has certain aberrant traits. The main thing about Asperger's is that it is a condition of extremes. You would do well to involve other people in the process who know you and who are capable of being honest and direct with you about what they see in you. Asking a bunch of strangers on a forum can help you obtain new information but it will do nothing to give you personal insight on yourself.

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Kroge
21 hours ago, AveApollo said:

my self-doubts similar to anyone else's?

What was your waiting time for diagnosis (in the UK)?

Are there any Aspies that 'appear' NT (such as make eye contact, try to get involved socially, use body language, have NT friends)? What were your experiences in terms of getting a diagnosis? Did doctors/psychologists doubt you? Did/do you friends and family doubt your diagnosis?

Thanks for reading.

1. yes they are. My mind was a cocktail of doubt and multiplying reflections around my diagnosis time.

2. Many weeks, perhaps several months. I kind of forgot about it. Once the first appointment came through the diagnosis happened quickly.

3. Yes there are many, especially when individuals have high intelligence. This is because high intelligence can compensate for certain traits as the individual can consciously copy certain behaviours. The ability to blend in is apparently more prevalent in women.

Let it be known that none of those traits are universal. They are just common, and even then not as common as people think. Lack of eye contact is a common stereotype but far from every autist has this trait. Many even have too much eye contact, or just normal eye contact. Like I said you can't focus on the specific traits because they are legion and quite individual, you have to look at the root behind those traits.

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AspieFox
21 hours ago, Mimo said:

My parents do not really believe that I have Aspergers. I don't think anyone would really know that I have Aspergers just from talking or working with me.

I'm in the same situation. I've not told my dad because he doesn't really want to believe that anything could be 'different' mentally about me, where the difference is a recognised official diagnosis. He tends to think that health professionals don't generally know best, and that his philosophies and his own 'mindsets', as he calls them, are all people need.

I did tell my mum about my struggles and that I've asked to be referred. She was very against the idea that I might have it (and we had big arguments). But slowly, she's coming to realise what the true description of Asperger's is, and I made her sit with me when I filled in the AQ, EQ and AAA questionnaires, so that she could monitor whether I was exaggerating or not. It was quiet funny...some of the questions (such as most of the AQ, I think) was written almost entirely as a description of myself! If it weren't so 'worrying' for my mum, she would have laughed at the things that they asked on the test, because it was so close to describing me. On the other tests, I wrote a lot of commentary on the pages, because I felt the questions were not specific or enough, or that a question could be taken more than one or two ways.

So at least I have the tests/questionnaires cross referenced with someone who knows me from childhood until now. Nevertheless, I can't help thinking that: we would believe ourselves more, if we had the believe of our parent's, or those close to us. Unfortunately, most of what I've had from my mum and my friends were that I was probably trying to focus on things and obsess too much, and that you "are no way autistic" etc. However, 1) they know less that us, because we were so concerned that we actually researched it, thoroughly. 2) even if they were presented with the facts, they might have their own prejudice which blinds them (something that my therapist made me remember more - that people tend to bring their own past experiences, prejudices or problems, so when talking to people try to remember that they aren't as black and white, or literal as me). For me, truth and facts are above personal feelings, no matter how hard they might be. There could be a time and place to say certain things (often I don't wait, but just say it), but fundamentally, for me facts and truth have to be place above, even if friendships might be broken because of it. Apparently, that is not an NT way of thinking. It was surprising to me that most people would not agree with it.

I will take my mum with me to the interview and she'll sit there for the most part (I might ask her to leave if I am really uncomfortable with some questions). I already told the clinicians that she is adverse to recognising that I probably have Asperger's, and when she did the Relatives Questionnaire in the post (about my interactions and behaviour aged 4, I think, up until 10), and I made sure they had some notes that I made about my mum's responses, because she was obviously looking to avoid answering in a way that could be different to other children or point to Asperger's. So they have both sides.

21 hours ago, Mimo said:

I suggest to make a list of the aspie symptoms you struggle with and include specific examples if you can. Add to that your school reports and if your family is willing to contribute add that as well. The preparations helped keep me busy so I didn't become overwhelmed with worry and kept me on track during the visit.  Best of luck to you as you seek diagnosis!

I started the list from the moment my GP made the referral! :) I've been adding to it. I bought the book The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome, by Tony Attwood. I have a digital copy and hard copy. The digital copy allows me to enter annotations and notes very easily, so I started doing that and writing real life examples that fit.

Thank you for sharing your experience. I helps to know that it's not just me that felt like this.

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AspieFox
12 hours ago, Nesf said:

Also, the very fact that you are researching it and analysing/worrying about it and all the details of it is a good indication in itself that you may be on the spectrum. I've been on this forum about 3 years now and I have seen many people in a similar position to yourself come to the forum going through the diagnostic procedure and worrying about the diagnosis, and nearly all of them went on to receive their diagnosis.

One thing people (NTs) constantly say to me is "you are going in to the details too much".

I just thought: perhaps my inclination for a black or white answer is the problem. Therapists have told me that I think in black or white terms (when I had OCD therapy), but I never mentioned deeper things about my social interactions much at the time, because OCD was the main thing that I wanted to tackle. So, perhaps the black or white thinking (which seems to be an Aspie thing) is making me want a definitive, clear cut, systematically ordered, clean cut diagnosis. However, the truth is, that diagnosis doesn't seem to fit neatly as 100% Aspie traits = Aspie. It seems that: if enough traits and symptoms are present and it is impacting on your life, than you are an Aspie. So it's not a black or white thing.

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AspieFox
2 hours ago, Kroge said:

Asking a bunch of strangers on a forum can help you obtain new information but it will do nothing to give you personal insight on yourself.

True. I'm not looking for others to provide personal insight of myself. That's impossible, as I don't know the replying people personally. I am hoping people will let me know about their feelings and self doubts, worries or anxieties during the waiting process for final confirmation. If I see that I am not alone, and that other diagnosed Aspies felt the same way, then that will make me feel that it is all part of the normal process and is also a behaviour or mental process that Aspies do, objectively/in general.

So I really value yours and other people's replies so far. It is helping me to see that this self analysis, self doubt and analytical-style thinking is not inconsistent of the Aspie mind, and is actually consistent with it. I don't expect everyone here would have gone through the same mental or emotional process, but just to know that some have, indicates that it's not abnormal for an Aspie to do so. 

I also feel a bit isolated, as I don't have real world Aspies that I can ask about these things, so it's great to reach out.

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AspieFox
2 hours ago, Kroge said:

1. yes they are. My mind was a cocktail of doubt and multiplying reflections around my diagnosis time.

I love the "cocktail of doubt and multiplying reflections", it describes my mind so well and is very poetic! 

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tystie

I hope you have more luck than I have had. I have been waiting nearly a year now for a diagnostic assessment. I know I am top of the waiting list but there is some problem with the funding from my local health authority. Nobody seems to know what the problem is. I go through spells of extreme self doubt and think I am being ridiculous to even consider that I may have AS. Then I have a bad day or three.......It is extremely stressful. Good luck with your assessment whenever it happens.

 

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AspieFox
1 hour ago, storm-petrel said:

I hope you have more luck than I have had. I have been waiting nearly a year now for a diagnostic assessment. I know I am top of the waiting list but there is some problem with the funding from my local health authority. Nobody seems to know what the problem is. I go through spells of extreme self doubt and think I am being ridiculous to even consider that I may have AS. Then I have a bad day or three.......It is extremely stressful. Good luck with your assessment whenever it happens.

 

I'm sorry to hear about the hold up. That must be really frustrating! I hope that they sort themselves out soon. Could you ask your GP to send you to a neighboring council's service? I don't know how it works, but if they could, and if you are able to travel, then it might be worth asking about it. It's not fair that you should be left hanging due to funding cuts.

I am very fortunate to live in Cambridghire, where there is the CLASS Clinic. They seem like authoritative experts on Asperger's. So I am quiet sure that they won't suffer delays due to cuts (I hope)!!

I sent them another email, to at least enquire about an approximate period. I'll probably get the generic response about having to wait and their number of cases to process etc.

This sounds harsh but, being in Cambridge, where there are so many competitive schools and parents thinking their child is so special or unique, I am sure there are lots of parents trying to get their children statemented, to give them extra time in exams or confirm that their child is a misunderstood special genius or something! The clinic must have a mountain of work. 

I am 34, so I suppose I should be pleased that, after feeling different and struggling with things for 30 or so years, the answer, and maybe help, is not that far away - in comparison.

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AspieFox

Update...

I was so anxious that I told them how anxious I was, and to please at least give me an approximate time period. Thankfully they replied the next day, telling me that they've looked at their list and it will be towards the end of the year. So referral sent by GP around January 2016, my tests and questionnaires were done in March and the final confirmation 'informal interview' will be before December 2016.

The whole process seems like it takes just under a year (and this is in the location of the UK where there seems to be some of the world leading researchers/very authoritative clinic, so lack of staff or resources seems unlikely). Perhaps they have a huge work load due to their stature, but they should only be taking on those in Cambridgeshire, unless I'm mistaken.

Anyway, at least I have an approximate time period. I hate uncertainty.

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AspieFox

Hello again everyone,

Tomorrow I have the appointment with the clinic psychologist (they had a cancellation and offered me a slot much earlier than originally planned). They said that it will be an informal interview lasting about 1 hour and 30 minutes. I've previously done all the tests and questionnaires they sent me. I've also sent a word document I made of reasons why my traits and symptoms seem to fit etc, especially having read in to T. Attwood's Complete Guide book.

I am so anxious right now that I just had to reach out and tell someone. I am so worried that the clinician will say I don't have Asperger's, because I don't appear different on the surface.

At 34 years old, I've been searching for why I think and act so different to the overwhelming majority, and AS seems to fit so well. If it's not this, then I'm going to be so disheartened and confused. I can't really argue with the clinician or ask for a second opinion, because this clinician is one of the best (works closely with S. Baron-Cohen at the Cambridge Autism Research Centre / CLASS Clinic). Of course it's possible to seek another opinion, but this doctor is one of the best experts around.

My mum is coming with me (she doubts I have it, because I appear normal and sought to play with others when a young child, and I make eye contact etc - basically not fitting the media/stereotype). But she's coming because the clinic will be able to make more of a firm diagnosis with historical perspective. They also want school reports. I found 3 from age 8 - 10 and the common theme is problems with paying attention, sometimes calling out in class and silly behavior at times, but one year says that 'I listen carefully to pupils, considering their views and responding thoughtfully, working well in groups or individually' - and paints a picture of a social child (which was true for a specific time, because I tried to fit in).

So, tomorrow is so important to me, I hope I can sleep somewhat and I hope I can keep calm with my mum who is adverse to me receiving a diagnosis (because she worries about it's implications for work, socially etc) but for me it would be a hugely valuable thing to help me finally live my life with understanding and self knowledge.

Stressed.

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AspieFox

Update...
 

Today had my clinical psychologist 2.5 hour interview appointment with a colleague of Simon Baron-Cohen, to be told: inconclusive. I am quiet down and frustrated...

Despite my tests all being firmly in the Asperger range and despite all my evidence from the T. Attwood book, she (the clinical psychologist) feels that there isn't enough evidence for or against it yet, and that she wants to send some questions to my ex-fiance(!), read my school reports, and have another appointment. So instead of thinking I'll get an answer today (which they said would probably be the case on their leaflet), I will be waiting for another month or two and possible "no, it's not AS", which would make me feel like an insane person, because it fits me so well, and I've identified with it for the last 7 months.
 
My mum was with me at the appointment and did her best to relativise my difficulties and downplay any differences as a child, painting the picture of a social normal child, even downplaying any sensory difficulties that she knows I definitely have now.
I tried to fit in the best I could and hid my differences. But as a child, as now, I just don't see the world or behave the same as everyone I know, (apart from my Aspie friends online and a few I met in real life), not to mention that I misread people/social situations and struggle with back and forth interaction.
The school reports however say I related to peers well and was sociable - Yes, because I wanted to appear normal and faked a lot of it! Is this the price we pay for faking and thinking of coping strategies? - That you are ultimately neurotypical because that's how you looked to family and teachers, and it doesn't matter that you were actively faking it and trying hard to fit in when you clearly weren't like them, but f*ck that - you appeared normal and didn't express your difficulties so you're NT. *Me: but Attwood etc say some AS children try to fit it; Psychologist: For girls, yes. You were a boy. (That last bit is hypothetical and how I feel it's going so far).
 
So we're at the point that it could be: ADHD; Gifted; Asperger Syndrome; all of them, or...*"none of them, go away you insane insecure freak".
 
I asked if she would finish at the end of it all and say "Inconclusive/don't know" and she told me "highly unlikely". My current intuition is that it will be negative - you're not an Aspie.
 
So I mentally and emotionally drained, as I thought this was the end of the wait to confirm my suspicions and that I could finally know, but as usual with me - it's complicated.
 
Having identified so strongly with AS on social media and in real life with friends etc, I'm gonna feel like a big idiot if they say it's not AS. I really got ahead of myself.
 
Did anyone else have the "inconclusive so far" thing?

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AspieFox

....(sorry for the massive spaces in the last post), I prepared this post outside of the website and pasted it, so it formatted wrong!).

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Little Guy
On 7/14/2016 at 4:15 AM, Nesf said:

I can appear NT in that I know what to say in common social situations.

Likewise for me. It is the uncommon social situations, parties, randomness where I have the most trouble.
 

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AspieFox

UPDATE! I had my final appointment at the specialist clinic yesterday and I am pleased to say that the psychologist diagnosed me with Asperger's Syndrome. The reason she asked other people for their accounts about me, was to follow thorough guidelines and be detailed to be sure.

So after about 10 months, I've got the answer. Worth the wait to know.

Now I feel relieved and a bit strange.

 

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Little Guy
On 11/18/2016 at 1:03 PM, AveApollo said:

a bit strange

Now, at last, you have a bread crumb trail to follow instead of just blindly wandering and wondering!:)

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Soloist
On 11/18/2016 at 6:03 PM, AveApollo said:

UPDATE! I had my final appointment at the specialist clinic yesterday and I am pleased to say that the psychologist diagnosed me with Asperger's Syndrome. The reason she asked other people for their accounts about me, was to follow thorough guidelines and be detailed to be sure.

So after about 10 months, I've got the answer. Worth the wait to know.

Now I feel relieved and a bit strange.

 

I'm really glad it's worked out for you. It must be a great relief and now you can move forward with your life and make the best decisions for yourself.

I've been referred for a diagnosis and am waiting for that appointment, which I'm told is comparatively quick in my area. But I've heard nothing back yet.

Just out of curiosity: did your diagnosis statement say "Asperger's Syndrome" or was it "Autism Spectrum Disorder"? I'm asking because Asperger's Syndrome was removed from the latest DSM (DSM-V) and is now encompassed by Autism Spectrum Disorder, and yet they are still using diagnostic tests designed for the previous version and everyone still knows it as Asperger's Syndrome.

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AspieFox
2 minutes ago, Soloist said:

I'm really glad it's worked out for you. It must be a great relief and now you can move forward with your life and make the best decisions for yourself.

I've been referred for a diagnosis and am waiting for that appointment, which I'm told is comparatively quick in my area. But I've heard nothing back yet.

Thanks :) yes it's a relief. Now I just can't stop thinking about the fact I'm actually autistic. I need a little while to digest it and talk to people about it I suppose. But it's a big relief and I am glad.
I keep thinking of questions that I didn't ask at the time, so I've been emailling the secretary - I hope I don't annoy them or sound like I'm doubting them! I just want to ask a few things and details, but I don't think it will change anything to do with the diagnosis. I am sure that they're sure, but just in case (I have a habit of repeatedly checking unfortunately)!

5 minutes ago, Soloist said:

Just out of curiosity: did your diagnosis statement say "Asperger's Syndrome" or was it "Autism Spectrum Disorder"? I'm asking because Asperger's Syndrome was removed from the latest DSM (DSM-V) and is now encompassed by Autism Spectrum Disorder, and yet they are still using diagnostic tests designed for the previous version and everyone still knows it as Asperger's Syndrome.

The psychologist told me verbally and that she hopes to get the 20-page report sent to me in the next few weeks, but I'm sure it will state Asperger's Syndrome. She said "You are on the Autistic Spectrum and it is Asperger's Syndrome due to the lack of any language delay". So it will be Asperger's instead of just the High Functioning Autism term, due to no language delays when child.
I think that in the UK, they are still using Asperger's Syndrome, as here they follow the World Health Organization definition, which is based on the IDC-10 classifications.

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Gone home

I thought in the UK earlier this year (May?) they had formally ceased diagnosing  aspergers - now formally diagnosing ASD or ASC ... though the term aspergers will continue to be used to aid understanding and recognise those diagnosed with aspergers already. I think the Guardian article may be wrong regarding the most current formal semantics .... not that it really matters ....

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AspieFox
14 hours ago, Going home said:

I thought in the UK earlier this year (May?) they had formally ceased diagnosing  aspergers - now formally diagnosing ASD or ASC ... though the term aspergers will continue to be used to aid understanding and recognise those diagnosed with aspergers already. I think the Guardian article may be wrong regarding the most current formal semantics .... not that it really matters ....

I don't know, in regards to the disuse from May onwards. Maybe that's the case.

If you google CLASS Cambridge, you will see that Asperger is in the name of the clinic is: Cambridge Lifespan Asperger Syndrome Service. Also, all their recent literature still uses the name Asperger's. The diagnostician was clear in saying it is Asperger's, so all indications point to the term still being in use. I will have to wait and see what the official report document states. Should know by the end of this month or start of December.

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Gone home

@AveApollo I'm not certain of the date. I was told May 2016 by the person diagnosing me last year but if you check the link below, scroll down, and it may clarify a little. I expect the term Aspergers will be used outside of formal diagnostics for many tears to come. I was diagnosed ASC, but with reference to aspergers being the previous title.

http://www.autism.org.uk/labels

 

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