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Nesf

Autism test "How Autistic Are You?"

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Nesf

It's very simple: if you had a speech delay as a child, you have autism. If you had no speech delay, you have Asperger's.

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Dr-David-Banner

An article by Tony Atwood is helpful:
" a child may receive a diagnosis of severe autism or High Functioning Autism at one point in their developmental history and Asperger's syndrome at a later stage."
The main distinction is if there's language delay and self-help issues (dressing, tying laces), it's autism. Later cognitive adjustment indicates high-functioning.
I do get extra points for memorising machines. To study and memorise bearings, bushings and even circlips is something I've often done (very autistic trait).
It would help me to find out more.
One more symptom I feel I have that's seldom mentioned anywhere. This is a deficiency in physical relation (and coordination to the brain). I noticed normal people transmit thought to activity. I see people working on a performance task (skilled or otherwise) and they fully concentrate. However I struggle to become active. I don't concentrate as well at physical work or may have tantrums. Yet if it's a graph, table, written information I can concentrate for ages. I also have sleep disorder and sleep a lot.

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Dr-David-Banner

I've not so much though of my autism as having backardness related till recently. Now, though, I can recall how a teacher once had to tie my shoe laces at school. There were severe ongoing problems with my learning processes except reading. I was a little slow learning to read but picked up thanks to comic books. The rest of it from woodwork to geography and especially maths was a non starter. Sports even worse.
Many psychologists feel Asperger Syndrome per se has no impact on early education. Others state Hans Asperger himself didn't make that distinction.
I definitely feel NT's easily recognise my autism yet not quite understanding that they do. One amazing feat I can pull off is to approach 3 or 2 NT's who are chatting and they don't notice my presence. Not a word is said or any pause in the conversation. I can then leave that group and still no reaction. I even have a theory on this because in all usual social interaction there is a reaction to "interlopers". Yet if, for example, a cat wanders up to a group of NT's who are talking,, do they respond, react, pet the cat? Why not?
On the theme of animals I relate to them (and they to me) much more than NT's. Lots of people on the spectrum love cats but for me I guess it's dogs I relate to (more so the wolf type breeds)



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Dr-David-Banner

This business about not being perceived by chatting NT groups has had me puzzled for a while. Neither do I think it's over exaggeration on my part. My female friends I've known for ages have also not altered their conversation if I appear. It sometimes pissed me off so I would often leave and go home without saying goodbye. They would then tell me later it was rude to just up and leave. This week 2 NT's told me I'd startled and almost upset them. They said they'd assumed they were alone, had looked to the side and just saw me right by them. They told me it felt like being crept upon stealthily but the truth is I just had strolled past on my way and paused to say "hello". There was no concept of creeping or tip-toeing. In fact my dog in such a case would just come up and make a fuss.
One thing that intrigues me is the subconscious. Communication doesn't just happen in the conscious sense. I used to think I got ignored due to lack of eye contact and poor feedback but I found that not to be true.

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