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Dr-David-Banner

Old Hag Returns

37 posts in this topic

"I reached to turn on the light and it was gone"
That leads to my simple question: What is it about darkness and night that enhances fear and leads us to run to the light for deliverance? If you think about it, those old Dracula movies showed the vampires suddenly get caught out by the light of dawn. They had to flee to their coffins and that then saved the good guys just in time. So, again, darkness and night in the recess of our mind holds an association with vampires, werewolves, ghosts, witches and even greys. My own childhood nightmare revolved around my hearing noises in the dark. I felt there were supernatural forces all around so I dreamed I would blindly run for the light switch. Then, I'd click the switch and nothing. I really don't know if that was really dreamed or real. Here is my theory: The night and darkness allows negative energies to peak. Maybe people fear the dark because deep down they have innate knowledge that they're more exposed to negative energies. When my friend phoned me up at 3.30 am she told me she was going to leave her bedroom light on. We see light as protective.

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I found out in idle reading that Whitney Strieber's book Communion actually impacted on his career negatively. I believe he was dropped by many publishers and essentially became bankrupt. Prior to Communion he wrote fiction novels. So career-wise, Communion was a risky book to publish. In my view, I think Strieber's purpose was to share inexplicable experiences via his book. I think he's also trying to say something very traumatic and enigmatic impacted on his life but doesn't know what. He never stated he was "abducted" by aliens but speculates about dimensions or parallel realities.
Personally, I don't have an issue over trying to make sense of creepy, paranormal, enigmatic encounters people claim. You have to be well off the resonant frequency of normality to even begin to try and understand beyond purely textbook science. Those of us with socialised, orthodox thinking are too closed to open up to metaphysical alternatives. The problem is amongst scores of crack-pots, fanatics, fantasists, New Age cultists, there are a few very offbeat but possibly perceptive individuals who may be genuine.

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Could all the disappearing asperclickers have been scared off by the Men In Black?
I provoked laughter when I casually mentioned the men in black to a friend. "That's just a film", she said. "It's not real!"
Here's a 1960's witness account of a man in black:

"Late one evening in her office in Point Pleasant, a mysterious short, olive skinned man dressed in black with large framed glasses and a bowl haircut asks Mary what she would do if someone told her to stop reporting on UFO sightings in the area. While slowly moving closer towards her, the man grabs a pen off her desk and stares at it fascinated. The man then runs out, laughing hysterically."
These MIB characters were just totally odd to encounter. They appeared to be FBI types and were somehow threatening and robotic. They basically visited investigators and witnesses and suggested they should just leave well alone. Yet they acted "normal" in a way even the worst actor couldn't pull off.
Now for the closest encounter I had so far with the MIB's. It remains a mystery and is equally a puzzling and even funny story.
Around Christmas a girlfriend gave me a packet of biscuits. When I got home, I put the biscuits on my sink and thought I'd save them for a treat. The following night when I got back I finally noticed something weird. The pack was half empty. This had me very confused but I finally shrugged it off and figured it must have been me. A week after, my friend gave me another pack of biscuits. At this time I was busy rushing about with my schedule so again I just placed the biscuits on the sink. I then went out. Later, on returning home, I looked to get some biscuits to have with a coffee and found only the wrapper. This really creeped me out. What was most weird was the wrapper had been cut into tiny strips. Therefore my first impression was it must have been rodents. I googled some ideas but I then started to think rodents surely aren't that tidy. Surely there would have been a mess? Crumbs for example. Then I figued the first time when the pack was half empty, surely only people eat selectively and numerically? Animals don't eat six whole treats and leave four. They leave halves or quarters. Then the sliced foil defied logic. And how could a rodent eat that much?
The closest I could come up with to date was maybe a squirrel (they remove food to store). Or a homeless person (but why leave slivers of foil). So leaving that aside was it indeed the Men In Black? Was the message, cease dabbling in occult matters or we'll eat all your biscuits. Oddly my old hag attacks started around this time.

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Posted (edited)

A conspiracy theory is a select few data points (facts) with the rest filled in with fear - and thats all they do, create more fear.

I feel its really important for mental wellbeing to remain grounded in my body and reality. I dont mind theoretically entertaining ideas, musing philosophically and wondering about a lot of the mysteries of our lives. I really feel its a cornerstone to health to be able to draw a firm line, with yourself on the side of reality.

Otherwise you are at risk of being captivated by cults, conspiracy theories, narcissists, and psychosis (which Aspergers and ADHD individuals are susceptible to - ASD is a risk factor for psychosis and are believed to have common origins (Aspergers did start out/was misdiagnosed in the past as schizophrenia, which it is not, but there are good reasons behind it). ASD individuals are known to be high on delusional belief- usually grandiose or persecutory. I have had a full blown episode of psychosis myself years ago, which is hard to admit here (I consider myself logical and intelligent) - but its not like this is my real name. I was not really myself at the time, I was unwell, which can only be seen in hindsight (For me it was due to unprocessed trauma). Its just a red-flag for me hearing these sorts of conversations. I only speak with kindness in case anyone needs to hear something grounded. 

Im not claiming anything about anyone here at all - thats not my business. I havent even read all the comments fully. I dont want to silence anyone elses perspective. I just think its really important for individuals with ASD to be very aware of this tendency to get a bit distanced from reality. There is a difference between creativity/imaginative capacity (which we dont want to loose) and delusion. 

Edited by Alice
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"The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane." Nikola Tesla
I think there's a certain state of mind where you oscillate somewhere off normality towards actual psychosis but retain enough reality to stay sane. That's when somehow you connect with paranormal phenomena because your brain is off frequency. 99.8 people are too normal to step back from environmental influences (accepted thinking) in order to experience deeper insight.
I'd say Jiddu Krishnamurti emerged from his studies of philosophy and mysticism intact. He had psychic experiences. As to the quote at the top I can't help but notice modern scientists tend to cling to rules and exactness. They idealise role models who were rejected in the past and tend to lack connection with nature (where physics comes into play).

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The problem with the "conspiracy theory" terminology is this; who or what decides what is or isn't conspiracy theory?

Many "conspiracy theories" are actually acknowledged scientific fact. The dissonance here is that most people (including ASD individuals) have their knowledgebase built mostly from information dispersed by mainstream corporate media and social osmosis.

For example. UFO and the existence of ET life and interaction with humans is a fact that is acknowledged by multiple governments - Iran, France, United Kingdom, Canada, and this year the USA has released its own CIA files on the subject. This is all easily fact-checked by anyone, and it was revealed in mainstream corporate media. How then can we call something a conspiracy theory when there are thousands of declassified files from multiple governments who clearly take it very seriously? If this metric is somehow not enough, the I ask again, who decides what is or isn't conspiracy theory? And how do you personally get informed of what is or isn't conspiracy theory at any given time?

Being grounded is an excellent goal, but what I notice in discussions like these is that people appear more keen to maintain their sense of "look at me I'm still normal" by constantly making references to how delusional or psychotic something else sounds, but in the end not much actual discussing of the subject occurs. Now when people make references to "staying grounded in reality", then it makes me want to know what their parameters for "reality" is, because there are a vast number of realities that play out in the human social field, hence stating "reality" needs a lot more context, especially on the internet where there isn't as much a common understanding of what another persons reality might look like.

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I try to find a balance between practical reality as we know it and all the philosophy, paranormal, theoretical side of my make-up. I'm currently doing my boat electrical work, the woodwork, painting and application. The rest of my time I'm doing work on broken tube radios that earns no money (people want mobile phones fixing instead). Therefore, I figure I have to sometimes get more down-to-earth or risk starvation. The other day a girl asked if maybe I could do her boat electrics at some point. I figured she's hardly going to pay me to fix a 1950's tube radio.

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Some information I'll share. I guess i had psychic, paranormal experiences from early childhood. I've no idea why. Now there's so much information and shared experience on the internet, it's possible to seek testimonies from others, to see if your own experiences are unique or not. Take this one:

"My husband and I are both able to smell cigarette smoke when the spirit of a particular "deceased" loved one visits our home. Sometimes this ability is referred to as claireolfactory or claireolfactant..."

I had this experience often when I was maybe 10. There was a famous actress who, when she appeared on TV, I used to smell very powerful cigar smoke. I used to get bad vibes too. Only recently, I did some net fact-finding and found that, yes, the movie actress actually had smoked cigars. Given not many women smoke cigars, I'd say that was plain strange.I don't relate it to spirits as the person quoted above (most people who have such experiences join spiritualist churches).
Claireaudience is what they call when you hear things others can't. I've rarely had this experience, except when I was about 10, it felt like I was bombarded by sounds at night. Not a pleasant experience. In fact, having researched it, I'd say maybe 75 per cent of paranormal phenomena I experienced was negative. Where I agreed with Whitley Strieber, however, is I now figure that somehow I winded up more enlightened and less afraid. Here's a recent observation to ponder: I was sitting in the garden a while ago with my German Shep. I was reading a book and he was lying down on the flagstones. Suddenly he jumped up, started to pace about and get excited. This agitation eventually got to be such a pain, I went to the gate, gestured at the empty road and said, "See! Nobody there!" I picked up my book again but he got worse, puffing, hackles up and all excited. And then I gradually heard the sound of a car. Eventually the car pulled up in the drive. So, for me, that was a mystery. The dog had reacted a good 10 minutes before the visit took place and a car covers a pretty decent distance in that time. I know dogs have great ears and smell but surely not over some miles away. We now know too dogs and cats have sensed cancers or even deaths before disclosure. In fact I find animals do have senses we simply don't notice as we under-estimate them.

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Budd Hopkins evidently passed away some time ago. He was the lone researcher who first began to use hypnosis. Book review here:
" For someone who believes that it would impossible for life NOT to exist outside of our own planet and species, this was truly an incredible book. As for the writing, Budd Hopkins (RIP) was an incredibly insightful and intelligent man (initially a sceptic) and this book, based on several case studies(out of over 600 case studies he's researched) was very, very intriguing. I've since watched interviews he's done and all I can say is 'Wow!' I couldn't put this book down and I will be reading many more in the future. Now I've got to go and read something funny so I can fall asleep tonight!"
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The very first case of hypnosis to recover subconscious memory was by Dr Benjamin Simon. This was a 1960's "missing time" experience. The subjects, Betty and Barney Hill had seen a bright light following their car, attempted to accelerate away from it but then winded up with blank memory. A film was made in 1975 called The Interrupted Journey.
Budd Hopkins seems to have been a go-it-alone hypnotherapist who started using the technique on his patients. One of these was the writer Whitley Strieber.
As I see it, there seems to have been 3 classes of these so-called abduction cases;
(1) Actual sighting of some strange phenomena (such as lights in the sky) and accounts of physical abduction and missing time.
(2) The experiences related to sleep. This is the aspect I relate to a kind of OHS or possible sleep paralysis.
(3) Combination of the two. That is the subject has seen lights in the sky on other occasions but also had the interrupted sleep.
Do I have a theory? Really I can't say for sure. I wouldn't ridicule Hopkin's patients as I can relate to their experience of sleep disorder or paranormal phenomena. I've no idea of the cause and can only speculate.

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Posted (edited)

Very good question raised. Why are so many "abductees" of ET or Grays, American based?
"'Research in Japan has had a headstart because sleep paralysis is well-known to most Japanese, who call it kanashibari, while it is little-known and less studied in the West.'We have a framework for it, but in North America there's no concept for people to understand what has happened to them,'' Professor Fukuda said. ''So if Americans have the experience and if they have heard of alien abductions, then they may think, 'Aha, it's alien abduction!'"
Tricky issue. I agree that prior to sci-fi monster, alien movies these experiences may have been interpreted in other ways. Take The Mothman. He was sighted and witnessed in 1830 London but called "Spring Heeled Jack". The description matched the sixties Wisconsin sightings of a red eyed, half-man, half bird and so on. Even the native American Indians have legends of the "thunder bird". So, granted - American UFO abductees could have suffered sleep paralysis and had the sci-fi element grafted into it via overly keen hypnosis researchers.
Speaking personally, during all my traumatic nightmare experiences that haunted me in childhood, I never encountered "a grey". I never associated the nightmares with "the abduction/strieber take on it. On the other hand, I wouldn't dismiss the paranormal aspect relating to such experiences collectively. The only point I do take note of above is possibly 80 per cent of weird nocturnal experiencers always seem to be Americans. You don't hear of any investigator from Portugal using hypnosis to uncover loads of Portuguese abductees who were beamed up into space for a quick medical examination. Centuries ago too it was all put down to sorcery and the greys were simply witches.

Edited by Dr-David-Banner
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I seem to have developed another even weirder ability. I seem to be able to put a friend into deep hypnosis although I never studied hypnosis. She will phone me up out of the blue and just ask me to relax her. Within 30 seconds she's gone. Voice faded, dream-like, breathing deeply. I then have to hang up and she sleeps deeply. Now she's asking me to do it more so she can sleep instantly. Not that I want to be hypnotist or some sort of Rasputin.

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