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Roxy

Anyone Have A Puppy?

6 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I have an 10 month old puppy and she's driving me nuts ! she constantly wants 24/7 attention, doesn't play with her toys, won't leave me alone basically.. and because I'm at home a lot if she's in her bed she barks a lot for me.. and always barks/bites if she doesn't get attention when I'm in same room as her

I don't know if she's too much for me and I should get a dog who's trained? she seems to need a lot of work..

Any advice/experiences would be welcome.

Having Aspergers I do need my own space and time on my own, but I feel suffocated at the minute and it's causing me depression, gaining weight etc.. 

Edited by Roxy
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The first step is never to be stressed around animals - you'll transmit your anxiety and create part of the problem you now have. Dogs are supposed to relax you, not stress you.
I raised a German Shepherd from around two years of age and, sure, I made mistakes along the way. His extreme tugging and pulling did use to wind my emotions up. I felt like I was holding a rocket. Also he was a devil for stealing my socks or gloves and big enough to growl if I tried to tug them away. I learned ways and means to handle aggression or behaviour issues. Such as using a ball and teaching "take" and "off".
This dog is now 12 and we gradually bonded over the years.
My advice to you is your dog needs to know first if you really want him. If the answer is the puppy actually stresses you and is a nuisance, he will pick up on that and be insecure. Do you connect with animals? If so, you will need to destress when the dog is not around you and then relax when you're together. Ultimately your dog could be great therapy for you. By the way he will pick up on your autism for sure as well as your feelings. Dogs can be very intuitive.

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I guess raising a large GSD taught me some important lessons. To be the Alpha leader isn't about having a deep voice but showing your dog you can take care of him. Dogs need to be cared for as in nature wolves rely on a provider. Dogs see calmness as an alpha characteristic and being able to sense their needs. Once dogs sense these things are in order, they become trainable and better behaved. The emotional baggage you get with autism mood swings is a negative but I eventually learned to relax with my dog. He often tested me. I recall a real crisis once when he grabbed a hedgehog and nobody could get him to let it go. In fact he dug himself in and was determined to keep the hog. I winded up using a bit of meat then grabbing the hog (who was totally unhurt). My dog just thought the hog was a new friend but the spines can be dangerous.

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Posted (edited)

Dogs are like small children is some ways - they need and can give a lot of affection and attention, they get bored easily and need stimulation and can be demanding. But like small children, they also need boundaries, they need to know the meaning of the word "no" or "down" or "off". Edit: this is not unnatural for the dog, in the wild wolves also have boundaries. I would have a room or area where your dog is not allowed and train her to respect it, tell her "no" in a firm voice and praise her when she does good. I'm not an expert on dog training but my family always had dogs - there are a lot of websites or books or youtube videos on dog training that might help.

Edited by Nesf
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"there are a lot of websites or books or youtube videos on dog training that might help."

The best was by a man from Wales called the "dog whisperer". He talked to his collies in more than one language and gave shows (sheep herding). Not to be confused with the American of the same title.
From Roxy's post it seemed so far that there are issues bonding between herself and the puppy. The puppy is reacting by becoming more clingy as he's picking up frustration. To give an example, last night my senior dog made himself sick so as to get my attention. He does this very rarely. He's old and maybe feeling ignored if I'm surfing mobile internet and in my own world. All I did was swill away the small amount of mess, give him a good hug and feed him some fresh biscuits. He then wagged his tail and eagerly ate his food. So, yes, dogs are sensitive and seem to like to give 100 per cent love in return for 100 per cent back.
Going by the post it's too early to judge how this canine/person relationship will develop. In my case, at the beginning, I was a bit slow to bond with my dog. I didn't understand how to approach it. A lot of people told me I wasn't stern enough but I finally learned being stern doesn't fool a dog if you crumble in a crisis. To be Alpha you have to be protective to the dog above all else. That means feeding, water, walks, games and being calm. I've heard of authoritarian police handlers crumble when their dog attacks someone and just lose their nerve. The dog will know all of this and can read people very well. In short, if you love your dog the rest will follow. Also dogs are great for autism therapy.

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im waiting on my landlord to approve of a dog. i have my eye on a german shepherd thats was recued from a killhouse.

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