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Roxy

Jobs For Aspergers?

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Roxy

Willow said in one of her videos that they told her to get a job.. now I'm worried if the same happens to me, what I should do? and what jobs could I do? I'm good on computers, can type well, but I don't like being around other people..

 

Any suggestions?

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Gone home

I notice that these days some people use earphones in office environments ,,, so in theory it could certainly be requested as a reasonable adjustment.

Discrete earplugs can also help to isolate oneself from others while still participating. I have made them out of dental putty from ebay ... the slight isolating effect of reduced noise really helps.

What about a quiet fuel station?

Nobody wants to work really.

Maybe while your income is benefit based try a some minimal hour part time jobs as experiments ... each failure would be a success and good practice .

At least you would be better equipped experience wise if the benefits did stop

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Sanctuary
12 hours ago, Going home said:

Nobody wants to work really.

This comment brought a smile to my face! It's true that employment brings valuable income and can have its good times but the bottom line is almost of us would rather be doing something else if we could. However most of us in the end do need to be employed...

14 hours ago, Roxy said:

Willow said in one of her videos that they told her to get a job.. now I'm worried if the same happens to me, what I should do? and what jobs could I do? I'm good on computers, can type well, but I don't like being around other people..

Any suggestions?

I think the ideal for someone with AS is a job where they can spend lots of time by themselves working on a particular task that they are comfortable doing. Self-employment may be ideal for this and can be built around your skills and interests but it's not always practical. However even when working for others there will be jobs which allow solitary work and which can relate to your skills and interests to some degree, e.g. data input / processing. Job centres / advisers may be able to point you in the direction of such jobs including some you'd never thought of. When discussing options with them it's best to pitch matters in positive terms, e.g. to say you are very happy to work independently rather than you are not so good working with other people. Good luck in your job search.

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Gone home

Voluntary work is also low risk and a help regarding building work history and references

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blacktiger911

i work at fedex as a delivery driver i drive a truck thats 33 feet long 10 ft hight and 8 feet wide and work 13 hour days monday through friday love it. i hate to say it but you might need to find a way out of your shell or find a midnight type job where you dont need to interact with people.

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Heather

It's scary to work with people in a job when you have never done it before.

Before I got my first cashier job at 18 years old, I did not think I could ever do a cashier job because I was so shy and anxious around people. I originally applied to work in the kitchen more so, but then when I started getting trained, the assistant manager decided it would be better if I was trained to be a cashier.  Since then, I have worked many years as a cashier which boosted my confidence of working with people. Although I still wouldn't want to recommend it as a career plan for someone with Asperger's.  But in my case, I managed okay.  

Though thankfully now I work as an Administrative Assistant which I like a lot more.  There are a lot of tasks I do on my own.  Though I am answering calls and redirecting them, most of the time it is okay because the people know who they want or what they want to do so I can easily redirect their calls using certain phone scripts, and I do not see them, so I can take a breath before I answer the call and relax again after I end the call.  Besides the phone, most of the job is independent now that I have learned most of the job.  And when I do need to talk to someone to ask them something or answer something, it is not too bad as I know the people I work with better and they are all nice, decent people. Although I tend to see the best in people.

Though, I understand that it is really scary to work with people when you are not used to it. That's why it would be beneficial for you or anyone in your position to get some experience.  Maybe start off with volunteering, as it might be less stressful as they are usually more flexible on hours, and you can usually choose how much time you spend to volunteer.  An idea would be a SPCA branch because then you get to see cute animals.  And I like the idea of going to a job center type thing where they can meet you, find out about your strengths and weaknesses and help you find where you might like to work. I think there are a lot of jobs that don't require constant interaction with others. Most will involve some unless you are self-employed and working from home, but you know, people are not all bad, and you might end up you like working with others when they are supportive and kind.

 It's probably best if you find something that you can try for 1-2 days a week so that you are not overwhelmed.  I am not sure how bad your anxiety is around people, but if it is really bad, maybe start with just going out to the mall or a store or a coffee shop or restaurant with a trusted family member or friend to get used to just being around people in general. I know it is a lot easier to avoid people when it makes us anxious but actually getting that experience and recognizing you can do it, that helps a lot.

And if it doesn't work out, then maybe you can use that as evidence to get income assistance which it sounds like you are on.

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Roxy
On 8/8/2017 at 9:58 AM, Sanctuary said:

This comment brought a smile to my face! It's true that employment brings valuable income and can have its good times but the bottom line is almost of us would rather be doing something else if we could. However most of us in the end do need to be employed...

I think the ideal for someone with AS is a job where they can spend lots of time by themselves working on a particular task that they are comfortable doing. Self-employment may be ideal for this and can be built around your skills and interests but it's not always practical. However even when working for others there will be jobs which allow solitary work and which can relate to your skills and interests to some degree, e.g. data input / processing. Job centres / advisers may be able to point you in the direction of such jobs including some you'd never thought of. When discussing options with them it's best to pitch matters in positive terms, e.g. to say you are very happy to work independently rather than you are not so good working with other people. Good luck in your job search.

Will the job centre help me get a job to suits me? I'd prefer working night shifts.. is that reasonable? 

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Gone home

@Roxy In the UK you can ask to see the disability advisor in the job centre and outline your needs. I did this almost a couple of years back ... they just referred me to the Remploy people who refered me to the county council careers adviser etc.

From a point of moral support the council careers person was the most helpful. I felt let down by the job centre adviser and Remploy, but, I wasn't exactly very patient at the time.

However, the moral support did enable me to end up in full time work (which eventually didn't work out).
When you need help, any help/support is better than none. Sometimes we need less support than we imagine. 

As the saying goes ...'Nothing ventured nothing gained'

Edited by Going home

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Roxy
23 hours ago, Going home said:

@Roxy In the UK you can ask to see the disability advisor in the job centre and outline your needs. I did this almost a couple of years back ... they just referred me to the Remploy people who refered me to the county council careers adviser etc.

From a point of moral support the council careers person was the most helpful. I felt let down by the job centre adviser and Remploy, but, I wasn't exactly very patient at the time.

However, the moral support did enable me to end up in full time work (which eventually didn't work out).
When you need help, any help/support is better than none. Sometimes we need less support than we imagine. 

As the saying goes ...'Nothing ventured nothing gained'

I know people who work with support workers with them, so there's many options I guess.

 

I think the most important is I have the right positive attitude to want to work and improve, so willing to try anything if the benefits people are reasonable with me too (not pushing me into a 40 hour a week job straight away when I've never worked for example)

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Gone home
5 hours ago, Roxy said:

(not pushing me into a 40 hour a week job straight away when I've never worked for example)

Start small.

Its easier to increase hours over time if things work out than reduce them when things don't work.
If in UK and worried about surviving without benefits I'd be looking 16 hrs or less.

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Roxy
On 8/17/2017 at 7:35 PM, Going home said:

Start small.

Its easier to increase hours over time if things work out than reduce them when things don't work.
If in UK and worried about surviving without benefits I'd be looking 16 hrs or less.

I'm happy to do that, but will the job centre be happy for me doing only part-time? 

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MrGrey
On 8/9/2017 at 10:16 PM, blacktiger911 said:

i work at fedex as a delivery driver i drive a truck thats 33 feet long 10 ft hight and 8 feet wide and work 13 hour days monday through friday love it. i hate to say it but you might need to find a way out of your shell or find a midnight type job where you dont need to interact with people.

 

  I'm with blacktiger911 on this one.  True that we aspies have a hard time interacting with people.  But harder doesn't mean impossible.  I also work in the field driving a big truck around and knocking on people's doors.  Then I go inside the houses and fix stuff.  It was terrifying at first, but I can now say I'm pretty good at it.  Way better than my NT peers.  I consistently win over customer satisfaction rates and my clients constantly call my office back to say I was the nicest technician ever.

  After a lifetime of working graveyard shifts to avoid people, I never imagined I could ever develop those skills.  Granted, I don't approach social interactions like an NT would.  It takes quite a lot of neurons to logically decode small talk and decide what's appropriate to answer.  But is not impossible.      

  

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Gone home
2 hours ago, MrGrey said:

True that we aspies have a hard time interacting with people.  But harder doesn't mean impossible.  I also work in the field driving a big truck around and knocking on people's doors.  Then I go inside the houses and fix stuff.

I think thats the recipe for success .... just a variety of fleeting task focused contacts at work. Having to interact with the same people at work each day for extended periods with dead time is where things can go irretrievably wrong

 

On 22/08/2017 at 4:10 PM, Roxy said:

I'm happy to do that, but will the job centre be happy for me doing only part-time? 

Yes, why not? There is also a UK government scheme where you can formally apply for support around work if required. Can't think of the name at the moment ... maybe someone else knows.

 

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blacktiger911

also having a job to fall on is nice you can put on your "job mask" and do things you wouldent like normal. i work and im still looking into service dogs for my personal life.

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collectingrocks

Once upon a time I never thought I would end up working with other people. I wanted to be a train driver where I would be alone up front in the cab and not have to interact with people all day.

Funny how things change/turn out. I started working with people from a young age and have built up my confidence over time. Yes, I've have serious setbacks but working with people can actually be fun and rewarding at times. If I hadn't worked with people on a daily basis, I might never had known I had AS...

 

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Melanie222
On 07.08.2017 at 9:42 PM, Roxy said:

Willow said in one of her videos that they told her to get a job.. now I'm worried if the same happens to me, what I should do? and what jobs could I do? I'm good on computers, can type well, but I don't like being around other people..

Any suggestions?

If you are good at computers, you can become a web designer or web developer. This job allows to have a minimum contact with people and make a good career. Personally I chose this way. I've been learning web design and in order to practise I build websites by means of different construction group wordpress themes . Of course, I have to improve my skills and knowledge to be a professional, but I've already been in charge of my time. Also I can work at home and feel comfortable.

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