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Roxy

Aspergers and Memory Problems/Dementia/Alzeimers

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Roxy

My memory is really bad, like I forgot things that most NT's remember, I'm slow to get stuff and understand it.. I'm worried I might have early memory issues as I'm VERY forgetful and it seems to be getting worse (like I lose a lot of things and misplace them etc which might just mean I'm clumsy but don't know)

 

Does anyone know of any link between Aspergers and Dementia/Alzeimers? 

 

I believe you can get memory problems even when you are young, it doesn't have to be an age thing.

Edited by Roxy

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Roxy

I'd love to see some research done on it, because I've read recently in a medical report people who don't sleep much tend to die earlier then people who sleep for like 8-10 hours.. 

So my theory is this; as Aspies our brains are wired to be constantly working, thinking, processing, overloading, depression, sleeping issues, stress etc.. surely that has got to shorter life expectancy or atleast brain functionality compared to NT's who can "shut off"?

 

I have trouble remembering stuff from even a few years ago.. and have no memories from when I was a child/baby at all.. it's like blank - worries me =(

Edited by Roxy

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Nesf

I haven't heard of any link between autism and dementia/Altzheimer's... in fact, I think that the opposite is true, that people with active brains tend not to get dementia or Altzheimer's.  Sleep deprivation can impact health, though, it's important to try and rest in the evening and get enough sleep.

Memory loss can be caused by a number of different reasons, and isn't necessarily permanent. It can be caused by stress/trauma (PTSD), depression, sleep deprivation, medication, alcohol/substance abuse, hormonal changes - if you're not sleeping well, that is probably contributing to it.

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collectingrocks

My short term memory can be really bad but I don't link it to having autism

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Ben

My long term memory is phenomenal. My short term memory is not.

I'll forget I wrote this post in about ten minutes time, and then I'll be surprised when I receive a notification for it. 

The more active your mind, the more you have to forget. Your brain just goes on auto-delete. 

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Miss Chief

Like @Ben I have excellent long term memory and bad short term memory. It used to worry me when I was young that my brain would fill up with stuff that isn't important and I would lose significant memories to make room for the random stuff in my head ;) 

On 05/10/2017 at 11:49 PM, Roxy said:

So my theory is this; as Aspies our brains are wired to be constantly working, thinking, processing, overloading, depression, sleeping issues, stress etc.

To be honest what you describe there sounds more like ADHD than AS.

I agree with @Nesf there is research that shows the more occupied your mind is the less likely you are to get Dementia etc.

Personally I think people on the spectrum tend to have excellent memories for things they are interested in (and sometimes for things they aren't like random facts or a conversation you had x years ago) although this can be selective, you can tune out if you're not interested, however, that isn't technically bad memory since you weren't paying attention in the first place and so there is no memory to store/lose.

I also think my poor short term memory is down to ADHD not AS.

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