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Myrtonos

Explaining Grammatical terms: adverb

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Myrtonos

Most words ending in -ly are adverbs, and conversingly, most adverbs end in -ly, this is how an adjective is made into an adverb. Some words ending in -ly are adjectives but these can have any of the following words directly in front of them: a/an, many, most, much, the.

Adverbs, like all verbs, can have 'I', 'we' or 'they' directly in front of them, and like nearly all verbs, can have 'to' in front of them. But while verbs that can have 'to' in front of them also take an -s for he/she/it, adverbs do not.

But not all adverbs end in -ly, so let each new post (by a native English speaker) be an adverb that doesn't. Each native speaker should only submit one such adverb. Even if you aren't part of this club nor into other languages, you could join at least temporarily and post.

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Nesf

Fast.

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Myrtonos

Today

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HalfFull

after

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Myrtonos
14 hours ago, HalfFull said:

after

That's a preposition. The adverb is 'afterwards'. Adverbs can also come at the beginning of a clause, have the verb directly in front of them, or even come at the end of a clause. If you don't know what a clause it, don't worry about the difference between a clause and a sentence.

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