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Myrtonos

Bindness or weakness to a colour and ASD

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Myrtonos

So I have been wondering what it would be like to have blindness or weakness to a colour in addition to being on the spectrum. While many of you may have heard that colour blindness is quite common, in fact it's weakness to a colour, usually green (Deuteranomoly), that's very common. I would suppose that any symptoms that have to do with colour would be different.

The ishihara test, the most popular colour discrimination test, is so sensitive that even some who never have real world problems indentifying colour may still fail the test. If you have many real world problems identifying colour, you would have realised early on in life.

Is it true that those with even a slight weakness to red (protanomoly) would also realise early on the life? I believe it greatly reduces the ability to see red lights, making them darker, even without casuing any other real world problems identifying colour. These include brake lights on vehicles and port side navigation lights on aircraft and vessels.

Just as there are advantages to the autistic mind, anamolous trichromacy actually increases the ability to distinguish certain colours, such as yellows, tans and shades of khaki in case of deuteranomoly and (I believe) protanomoly. I would imagine that weakness to blue (tritanomoly) increase the ability to distinguish colours in the yellow-green-blue region.

Green on both road traffic lights and on railway signals looks more green than blue to me? It is any different for the green-weak?

So what is it like for someone with Asperger's in addition to blindness or weakness to a colour when they do normal colour vision tests?

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Miss Chief

Assuming you were born with it, how would it make any difference to someone with Autism... they would never know the difference? 

I have Tritanopes specifically what is commonly called blue/green colour blindness; I confuse some blues with greys and some greens with blues. I do see more shades of some colours than others too. I knew I had this very young because I would get corrected frequently on what colour I said, If I said something was grey I would be told it was blue if I said something was blue I might be told it was green.

But  was born this way, I always have and always will see those colours the way I see them... how would this effect my AS?

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Myrtonos

Well, if someone who confuses green and blue doesn't refuse to eat green food, they also won't have an aversion to blue food. And if they confuse red and violet and refuse to eat red food, they will also refuse to eat violet food.

Sometimes A.S.D sensitivity issues with sight can be colour related, and these will be affected by which colours one can distinguish.

But note there is a difference between blindness to colour and a weakness. Those with at least mild weakness to colours can still make a clear distiction between the four peripheral colours, red, yellow, green and blue, but may have trouble with fine-grained colour distinctions such as blue and mauve and green and chatreuse.

To someone with tritanopia (but maybe not tritanomoly) the colour of the sky is like the colour of lush grass, only darker in colour. How would you describe what you see if you just use the same word for any two colours you can't distinguish?

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Gone home
13 hours ago, Miss Chief said:

I have Tritanopes specifically what is commonly called blue/green colour blindness; I confuse some blues with greys and some greens with blues.

I wonder how common this is in the general population. We have a light metallic green car. It surprising how many people insist its blue with the odd person thinking silver.
I can understand the confusion with silver but not blue.
Anyway, you have explained something I was not aware of and solved a mystery there

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Miss Chief
13 hours ago, Myrtonos said:

Well, if someone who confuses green and blue doesn't refuse to eat green food, they also won't have an aversion to blue food. And if they confuse red and violet and refuse to eat red food, they will also refuse to eat violet food.

Sometimes A.S.D sensitivity issues with sight can be colour related, and these will be affected by which colours one can distinguish.

But note there is a difference between blindness to colour and a weakness. Those with at least mild weakness to colours can still make a clear distiction between the four peripheral colours, red, yellow, green and blue, but may have trouble with fine-grained colour distinctions such as blue and mauve and green and chatreuse.

To someone with tritanopia (but maybe not tritanomoly) the colour of the sky is like the colour of lush grass, only darker in colour. How would you describe what you see if you just use the same word for any two colours you can't distinguish?

To be honest I can't think of any blue or violet foods. Generally the issue with coloured foods can be that you don't like them mixing like peas and carrots or green and orange mixed up. I still don't get you point though... colour blindness is a life long thing and you will always have perceived the colours the way you do so you would never have had an issue with colours you see that don't bother you and you would always have had an issue with the colours you see that do bother you... the fact you perceive colour differently to others is irrelevant, it how you perceive it that matters and that doesn't change.

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Myrtonos

Okay, so one issue with coloured foods might be that you don't like different colours, such a yellow and green mixed up, but this could not happen without distinguishing those colours. Also, I make the distinction between blindness to a colour and a weakness. Those with a weakness might not have real world problems identifying colour, or have fewer of them, and less significant ones than those with blindness to any colour.

True blindness to blue causes not only confusion between blue and green but also the following confusion pairs:

*Orange and pink

*Bright yellow with white and darker yellow with shades of grey.

*Blue and dark green.

*Violet and dark red.

But a weakness to blue causes fewer of these, and less significant.

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Miss Chief

You just don't seem to get my point... blindness or weakness is irrelevant, it's something you are born with so you will have ALWAYS seen colour the way you do... therefore it cannot possibly make you have 'more' issues with ASD since you have NO point of comparison, you either have ALWAYS had an issue with the colours as you perceive them or you haven't EVER had the issue (which frankly is no different to anyone else on the spectrum with colour sensitivity), it cannot make your experience worse since both conditions are things you are born with and you will have always felt that way, you cannot compare your experience to someone else's either since we are all different when it comes to ASD and sensitivities anyway.

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Myrtonos

It seems you have misinterpreted. I'm not saying that blindness or weakness to a colour makes someone have more issues with A.S.D. I'm wondering if colour related sensitivty issues are likely different if one differs in which colours one can distinguish. As for the issue of not liking mixing some coloured foods with certain foods of other colours, what I said is that this aversion to mixing, say, orange and pink foods, relies on the ability to distinguish those colours, not on any point of comparison with another's experience.

That said, while one with a blindness or weakness to a colour is indeed born with it and obviously cannot read others' minds, they will, if they have real world problems indentifying colour, have the experience of others refering to things by names with no meaning to the person with that blindness or weakness.

If a colour defficient person also on the spectrum grows up surrounded by colour normal people not on the spectrum, then the neurotypicals might refer to things by names with no meaning to the person on the spectrum, and I do wonder if this can affect their experience. Could it be such a person might not realise that they A.S.D is separate from their colour defficency?

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Miss Chief
14 hours ago, Myrtonos said:

If a colour defficient person also on the spectrum grows up surrounded by colour normal people not on the spectrum, then the neurotypicals might refer to things by names with no meaning to the person on the spectrum, and I do wonder if this can affect their experience. Could it be such a person might not realise that they A.S.D is separate from their colour defficency?

What??? You just don't make any sense... If I see a colour as a small child my parent will inform me what colour it is for example lilac I now identify the shade I SEE as lilac even if what I see isn't in fact true lilac as others would describe it, I still know that what I see is what other people call lilac... maybe to me it is grey or blue... the fact I see it differently to the person who told me makes no difference, I will always see what I do when I see lilac and I will know this colour is what is called lilac even if it doesn't look like a pastel purple to me. So OF COURSE the names have meaning to me. Even if I see grey it is still a unique shade of grey. Without looking through someone else's eyes and using their brain how could I even know what I see is not what they see. The only time issues occur is with more generalised colours for example I might call something blue that most people see as green that is when I will be corrected and that is when I realise I perceive colour differently to others... it doesn't change anything though... I see what I see and I always have, if it's different to what others see... so what? Other than the odd disagreement when I was young (I learned quick to not argue the point since clearly I see things different to the vast majority of other people) it has zero impact on my life, if I did have a sensibility to colour then it would just be to the colours as I perceive them the same as an ASD person who has that sensibility while seeing the colours 'normally'. It has zero impact since you're only point of reference is your own experience!

Also what are all these purple, blue and pink foods you eat? Even orange is pretty rare for foods. Most foods are green or white>yellow>brown... I suppose with spices we can get reds too (red food it pretty rare too though) but I can't think of ANY blue food (blue is an exceptionally rare colour in nature) and the only examples of purples (red cabbage and red onions) both look red to me. I can't see how you could get blue or pink food without using food colouring and why bother just eat it in it's natural colour.

I'm unsubscribing this thread now.

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Myrtonos

The fact that you see an individual colour differently doesn't make a difference, true, but that others distinguish colours you don't (or vice versa) does make a difference, it's not about how you or anyone else sees each individual colour. In order to indentify the shade you see as lilac, as opposed to grey or blue, you must be able to distiguish between lilac, blue and grey.

I never said I eat purple, blue or pink foods (by the way, blood oranges can be pink inside), and oranges, mandarins, apricots, peaches, and the most common variety of carrot are or tend to be orange. I couldn't care less here about how one gets blue foods. My point is that which colours one can and can't distinguish do have an impact on one's life. If one person has a sensibility one colour and not another, another person who doesn't distinguish between them won't have a sensibility to one colour without having it to the other colour. To have a sensibility to either some shade of blue or some shade of green, one must be able to distiguish between them. But a sensibility both to some greens and some blues can work even without distinguishing between those greens and those blues.

That's what I stated before.

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Myrtonos

Here's an idea, get your hands on a colour distinction test book, look at the plates and write down the figures you see and send off what you wrote. Make sure you do it in proper lighting. A really good one is the HRR test, both because it's less well known than the Ishihara test (it's harder to cheat with a less well known plate test) and because it tests all colour distinctions including between green and blue and red and violet, while the Ishihara only tests those in the red-yellow-green region. Online tests are not recommended.

It would be interesting to see how colour sensibilities of those on the spectrum who can pass the test compare with those who fail.

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