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About This Club

A club to revel in all things prog rock, and prog related.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. I agree with you completely about venues and concert experiences. I only meant to suggest that smaller venues will make tickets more scarce for an act as popular as anything Floyd-related, but I do vastly prefer small, seated venues and audiences who respectfully appreciate the music. The risk for non-attention-seeking folks who just want to enjoy the music is that you never know what sort of audience you're going to get. I went with a relative to see a more mainstream band they liked a few years ago, and the audience were a nightmare, constantly screaming, whooping, clapping out of time, rushing the stage, etc. which to some extent ruined the experience. Thankfully, when I saw the Jon Anderson lineup of Yes last year, the audience were perfectly fine and I loved the show. My dad and I thought about going to see the Steve Howe lineup this year, but couldn't due to travel arrangements. I'm kind of glad we didn't, because a video I saw on YouTube of the gig was full of old drunk geezers singing along out of tune, which would be bad enough with any band, but with Yes?! Ugh. So audience behaviour clearly isn't related to genre. It's a real gamble. I suppose King Crimson would be the only safe bet. I hear Fripp doesn't tolerate that sort of thing. I have very little patience for artists who whine about non-disruptive audience behaviour. Unless they're actually disrupting your ability to play or other fans' ability to enjoy it, shut the fuck up and be grateful that they're paying you so much money to do something you enjoy. There are many talented musicians out there who'd give anything for just a fraction of Wilson's average audience and certainly wouldn't see attentive listening as a cause for complaint.
  3. To be honest, I prefer to listen to music at home, rather than go to a concert. At home, I can hear everything in detail without distortion from often dodgy stage audio equipment played too loudly, shouting and screaming fans who care more about making as much noise as possible and don't seem want to listen to the music. I actually prefer to go to a venue where the audience is seated, because I just want to be able to listen to the music without interference or participation from a noisy audience. If the live concert is particularly good, I will buy the recording, but mainly I stick to studio albums. Steven Wilson held a concert at a venue known to me, the Warwick Arts Centre, and complained bitterly because the audience was seated. In fact most rock music fans and musicians would rather the audience were standing, but for me this is an advantage! I find that other people have a completely different opinon to me about what constitutes having good time and a good experience.
  4. I hope so too. I wouldn't be able to get to London anyway, but even if they eventually play somewhere more local, I would imagine that tickets will be very hard to come by at a reasonable price given the size of the venues.
  5. Yes, I had heard about this, and I do like their early pre-1971 stuff. Will definitely be watching out for this, hopefully they will be recording and releasing recordings of those concerts.
  6. I don't know if anyone has heard, but Nick Mason will be playing early (which I would interpret as meaning pre-1971) Pink Floyd material with a new supergroup named after the Saucerful of Secrets album. Even though I'm most partial to the 70s material, it's nice to see this era getting some appreciation, since the rest of the band quickly distanced themselves from it, playing very little of it live. http://ultimateclassicrock.com/nick-mason-saucerful-of-secrets-band/ Website: http://www.thesaucerfulofsecrets.com
  7. @Alex I highly recommend her 2005 album Aerial if you haven't heard it.
  8. I hope this fits in here I don't know if it's considered Progressive rock, maybe more like Progressive Pop, however I think Kate Bush is very progressive in her approach to music. She was definitely not mainstream. And also, I am crazy about her music even though I've only listened to some of her records. Hounds of Love and The Kick Inside are personal favourites of mine. Her music and especially her voice really speaks to me.
  9. Yes, you are right, I was referring to 80s Genesis from Duke onwards. I didn't express myself concisely enough.
  10. Though I'm not a fan of the 80s and 90s stuff at all, I must take slight issue with this statement. The first two albums they released as a four-piece, A Trick of the Tail and Wind & Wuthering are solid progressive rock albums with the classical and folk influences of their predecessors largely intact, and the live album Seconds Out (featuring Bill Bruford) arguably represents the peak of their musicianship. Steve Hackett's departure in 1977 marked a much more significant shift in style and quality control, but I find the suggestion that any major change occured immediately after Peter's departure a little too reductive.
  11. Sirius

    Pink Floyd after Roger Waters?

    I was in a similar position to you, in that I strongly resonated with Syd's music (and still do) but couldn't really get into The Dark Side of the Moon or Wish You Were Here, which probably had more to do with my own preconceptions than anything else. Most of classic prog bands are very much about escapism and spiritual uplift, whereas post-Barrett Floyd were more about confronting the darker aspects of the human condition such as mental illness, poverty, political corruption, war, etc. in an immersive way. If ever you wanted to investigate further, I would recommend listening to the Roger Waters dominated era; Animals, The Wall and The Final Cut, and then working backwards. They're more direct, more intense, less instrumentally-focused albums and may give you a clearer idea of where the band is coming from emotionally... based on my experience, anyway. Their second album A Saucerful of Secrets features two songs that Syd contributed to and the rest of the tracks noticeably attempt to emulate his style, though perhaps with questionable success, but if you liked The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, you may also enjoy this one.
  12. DavidTheWitch

    Pink Floyd after Roger Waters?

    This has become my favorite Pink Floyd song. It describes perfectly what it is like to have an anger management problem!
  13. Gone away

    Pink Floyd after Roger Waters?

    Tbh not alot if anything ... Dark side of the moon (which people used to rave on about) never grabbed me in the slightest... the older stuff had an instant grab factor ... maybe its attention span related .... I get off put by long rock solos too these days. Back in the day I would listen to music for hours every day + study guitar for hours daily. These days I don't really have any listening sessions at all ... maybe I should look at that again as I could do with some focused some relaxation time.
  14. Sirius

    Pink Floyd after Roger Waters?

    Out of curiosity, what have you heard from the post-Syd era?
  15. I like this, but I don't think that it's prog rock.
  16. DavidTheWitch

    Al Stewart... He is progressive right?

    Might be his later stuff like Russians and Americans.
  17. Which site says that he is a 'progressive rocker'? (Google is just a search engine and can't 'tell' us that, but websites can). I like a lot of his music, but wouldn't describe him as progressive, at least not the albums that I heard. 'Year of the Cat' is a good album.
  18. Google says Al is a progressive rocker. Does anyone like him?
  19. Nesf

    Yes vs. Genesis

    Hmmm, 80's prog... the 80s aren't exactly renowned for their prog output, but you could try some of the neo-progressive bands such as Marillion, or Eloy, Rush (in particular Permanent waves), Asia Minor, Solaris - Marsbeli Kronikak, Bacamarte - Depois do Fim, King Crimson - Discipline, P.L.J band - Armagheddon, Celelalte Cuvinte's first self-titled album.
  20. This is Genesis all right, but I don't think that it is progressive rock - Genesis ceased to be a prog rock band after Peter Gabriel left.
  21. DavidTheWitch

    Yes vs. Genesis

    I am into the 70s however my focus is more around the 80s!
  22. Sirius

    Yes vs. Genesis

    Have you listened to any of the 70s material? This is the prog forum, after all...
  23. DavidTheWitch

    Yes vs. Genesis

    I am getting into Yes but I still prefer Genesis.. Especially since I saw this .
  24. Gone away

    Pink Floyd after Roger Waters?

    The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967 album) resonated strongly with me when younger ... Bike ... Gnome etc... classics. Never felt like investigating their future stuff ... found it non-stimulating. I'm the only person I know who's not keen
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