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  1. Last week
  2. HalfFull

    Clues that Trixi has Asperger's

    I feel sure that in the comments section in one of those videos someone claimed she was Autistic and she disagreed. Social Anxiety is often the product of ones environment, but what's to say that is or isn't true in her case.
  3. Sanctuary

    What are your faveorite autism documentaries

    There are a lot of fascinating issues about "reality" documentaries in general, whether about autism or some other topic or activity. How the participants are selected is probably the most important as there are potentially a huge number who could fit the criteria. Some individuals may be asked but decline to take part or agree but then withdraw at an early point; others may be filmed but their experiences not included. There is likely to be far more material filmed than included so there is always the question of how representative are the segments we see on screen. There is a suspicion - justified or not - that the producers favour those who "come across well on television" or who have a "narrative" or "back-story" that fits a certain agenda or will appeal to viewers. In some cases the narrative or back-story may even be "adapted" to fit a version that makes for "better" television. Of course there is always the issue that those who are filmed may be very partial in terms of what they reveal about themselves and that some involved may see the programme as an opportunity to gain attention and often "good publicity" (or sometimes may feel even bad publicity gets them some sort of "fame"). As you mention employers and other organisations may see documentaries as a way in which they can promote their company and show how enlightened they are. Job opportunities and other "happy endings" may be not what they seem so a job may turn out to be temporary or on a trial basis, or it may be permanent but fall through or turn sour a short while later. Maybe this is where update documentaries may be more revealing, seeing what has happened a year or several years later and seeing which changes are fleeting or illusory and which are long-term or genuine.
  4. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    I am simply relieved to know kids in the USSR who showed identical symptoms to me were helped in special schools. One became a radio engineer just like me although such people worked in special faculties. It was clear kids who struggled with autism were addressed by specialists although the downside was there was this tendency to use medications. Somehow it was thought everybody should be normal and adjusted.
  5. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    Articles I am digging up from USSR autism research I consider to be very high quality. USSR research I think was ahead of modern Russia. Interestingly "all" my symptoms would likely have led to classification of "organic" autism which means supposed damage to part of the brain via pre-natal infection, either of mother or foetus. Symptoms of organic autism are: Dominant linguistic intelligence with pronounced delay in mathematical, time-spatial capacity. More pronounced motor impairment and physical clumsiness. Definite learning issues at school due to attention difficulties. Prosopagnosia. Very acute lack of emotion and empathy. Complex speech patterns as in long-winded and formal. Usually "special interests" tend to be very non-practical. Above all I was fascinated by the description of low physical motivation to start and finish some task. As well as the kind of drift in thinking processes where focus shifts from subject to subject. All of this describes me perfectly. However, this is only one grouping. Those believed to be autistic without biological cause or birth infection (measles, fever) differ somewhat. School education tends to be excellent in some areas including maths. Dyspraxia less evident. Interests more intellectual. I do not know if either my mother or myself had some infection during pregnancy. I did feel though so far as symptoms go the biological classification corresponded. Finally I would agree my linguistic intelligence was far higher than mathematical and logic. I was naturally good at language. However my maths is now quite strong due to some years of intense study but maths was forced. I used to get real blocks doing even simple maths. At school problems tests used to be traumatic. Such as if Molly has five pounds and spends fifty five pence of her money on liquorice and twenty pence on a toffee apple, how much change does she..have? At school somehow I just froze and switched off. Yet today I can create complex maths formulae to solve electronics inductance or phase exam questions. Without ever having a teacher. So I guess my maths was developed through intensive work. .
  6. Aeolienne

    What are your faveorite autism documentaries

    I met Alan in real life the day before yesterday and we are now friends on Facebook. However he is not at liberty to reveal how he funded his relocation from Herts to the East Midlands, other than that it was motivated by a desire to move out of his parental home. He did reveal that the second "job" he had in the programme, as an analyst with an energy consultancy (E.ON at their Annesley office near Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire), was a short-term placement organised as a PR exercise.
  7. Myrtonos

    Clues that Trixi has Asperger's

    By the way, some of her videos are in German, but the early ones, before her first video in English, are still without English subtitles. But there is a way to add them. You can try it here. You can try it here.
  8. Earlier
  9. I’ve tried to convince my parents to homeschool me but we tried that when I was younger and it didn’t go well. thanks for your reply
  10. It sounds a great idea although if 1,000 people go as one big group someone with AS could be back to Square 1. I'd say there are likely to be pros and cons.
  11. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    Just a slight deviation. I located an essay by Stalin on linguistics and language. It sort of surprised me as the essay was quite academic and showed signs of a lot of research and thought. Much of it was based on Marxist philosophy so it would take me some time to try and analyse the arguments. Stalin was by no means autistic and today in Russia there's a deep divide over his legacy. What did strike me though was that Stalin by his writing seemed so much more intelligent than Donald Trump. To add to that the USSR led by Stalin defeated Nazi Germany at a cost of 25 million dead within the USSR. Prior to that was WW1 plus the Civil War. The mistake I see often is to judge historical figures by modern norms and standards. We forget in the 1930s and 1940s life was unpredictable with war, famine, revolution and even cities like London bombed by night. Last week I saw Roman Polanski's film The Pianist which was about the occupation of Poland and repression of Polish Jews. I'd no idea Polanski had witnessed this in childhood. The war was so bloody the scars today haven't healed. Poles, Ukranians and Baltic States still blame Russia due to Stalin's repressions, labour camps and exiles. I just found it odd to read Stalin's academic essay on linguistics and find he was so much more intellectual than Trump. Being a Night Owl too is a good sign and Stalin tended to, rise around noon.
  12. I understand your perception. All of us at times will come across someone who is autistic and feel that in the context we've encountered them they seem neurotypical. However that is like a snapshot of that person and in other contexts their autism will be very evident and maybe much stronger than ourselves. As I've suggested earlier in the thread, online communication especially can seem to minimise a person's autistic traits as it is a medium in which they tend to feel more comfortable. Face-to-face communication / interaction is where those with autism are much less comfortable. There are of course other aspects or issues in which autism manifests itself which may not emerge on a message board. One of these can be specialised interests. While some with autism will raise these on forums, blogs, etc, many keep them private which means that aspect remains hidden. For example I have very deep interests in some (apparently) esoteric topics but don't discuss them here (or with almost anyone) as I feel they will seem irrelevant or pointless to them. Some autistic individuals do want to discuss their interests on forums like this but others do not. As regards debates on topics such as copyright there is no "autistic" or "neurotypical" position. Indeed that is true for the vast majority of points for debate. There will be some neurotypicals (albeit probably working in the music business) who will take a position similar to yours; my guess though is - leaving aside the rights and wrongs of the issue itself - the vast majority would favour the more relaxed position and that is probably why you were in a minority position on that issue - not because of autism but because that is the general balance of opinion. It is possible other members agreed with you but didn't want to be drawn into a debate. People can especially feel uncomfortable speaking in favour of a minority position. I sometimes come across topics on Asperclick and elsewhere and disagree with the views expressed but refrain from expressing a contrary view because I don't want to be drawn into a debate, especially one which I feel is unlikely to go anywhere and will not change minds. To your credit you are prepared to express views which are minority ones when many other people will be reluctant to do so. Minority or "unpopular" opinions are not necessarily wrong ones and may sometimes be more accurate; sometimes though they are views that are unconvincing. Whatever their validity it's no bad thing to hear contrary views expressed just to make us think again and sometimes take a different path.
  13. If someone on the spectrum is like neurotypicals in a way I am not, that can make them seem neurotypical. That thing about copyright issues is one example, why did practically everyone who commented on that thread write in agreement with most neurotypicals?
  14. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    One huge factor here is "defective thinking" very common with autism, schizophrenia, O.C.D. and so on. This is when all your menta energy is burnt up with negative thoughts and anxiety or phobia. Not fitting into society is "hugely" stressful in itself. Someone with HFA can worry endlessly about being disliked. I had an autistic friend who was gifted at maths but later in life got bogged down by dysmorphia delusions (I suffer from this to a smaller degree and dislike cameras). For a huge number of autists the stresses of being different prevent application to some field. It's a real struggle. What I notice though is suspected autists like Perelman direct all their energy into their interest. They still suffer from isolation and frustration but choose to bury themselves in their work. Musicians may likewise just practise for hours. For me maybe the turning point came as I realised most people live an illusion and have a one dimensional view of the world. They idealise appearance but not substance. They tend to view everything here and now but rarely consider how limited we are in vision. I always figured science has the solution to every problem whether sickness, overpopulation, famine or equality. It seems though science no longer attracts people to hope and more countries are replacing sciences by religion. The mathematician Perelman was at one time living on just 200 dollars a month and much of his research was mostly voluntary.
  15. Aeolienne

    Do you have a supportive family?

    My parents' initial reaction to my diagnosis back in 2001 was that I must be "borderline".
  16. (Not written by me) Festivals are all about the collective. Who's carrying the beers? Who's going to hammer in the tent pegs while you hold the frame down in the wind (and let's face it, rain)? And who's got the spare bog roll when you run out with two days to go? Heading to a packed field this summer can be a daunting prospect when you're on your own. It can be nerve-wracking to strike up a conversation, especially when loneliness is rife among young people - a BBC study last year found that 40 per cent of 16 to 24-year-olds experience it often. Enter Camp Loner. Download Festival has led the way in making a noise about social isolation and loneliness at festivals, with the concept later spreading to the Bloodstock and Reading events. The annual rock and metal festival at Donington Park near Derby has played host to Camp Loner since 2008, offering a spot for the solo camper to meet new like-minded pals. "Because it is alternative stuff, is rock and metal, and many people in our group didn't have a ton of friends in school and were marginalised," Ben Willmott, who helps to run Camp Loner, tells The Big Issue. "Obviously I am stereotyping here and that is not all of us but we do get a lot of people joining our group who are anxious and nervous and might only have a few friends online and that's it. "It's genuinely one of the most heartwarming bits on a Wednesday afternoon when people arrive at the festival, seeing people chat when they hadn't even met just two hours before and they are relaxed and talking rubbish and really enjoying themselves. Friendships are blossoming and it's just great." Camp Loner was started almost by accident when one reveller from Jersey was let down by his friends a couple of months before the festival. He posted a plea for other people in the same position to join up with him at the campsite. That first year brought together a small core of 35 to 40 people but now as many as 1,000 people camp together in a special cordon of the campsite after organisers made the special community an integral part of the Download experience. And it is not just about five days in June either with Willmott, alongside fellow Camp Loner organisers Louise Bedwell and Chris Morris, organising meet-ups and keeping the "community vibe" going throughout the year. He says: "Going on your own can be very daunting - there is 90,000 of them and one of you, there's five whole days and you're in the middle of nowhere, what do you do? What do you say? Actually it is one of the easiest things in the world. "Yes, you do have to sort of reach out to engage in conversation but that little investment pays back a thousand-fold in a matter of hours." "Big" Jeff Johns is all about conversation. The 36-year-old has become a legend in the Bristol music scene for his insatiable passion for gigs, sometimes taking in more than one per night. With his fuzzy blond hair and his 193 cm frame, Big Jeff is unmissable down the front enthusiastically getting into the rhythm, whatever the genre. "My experiences at gigs have helped to save and change me. For me, it was the excitement of seeing the musicians that drew me to gigs and being able to connect to something," says Johns, who was diagnosed with Asperger's a few years ago. "I find a lot of social situations very intimidating but as soon as I go somewhere and see a stage and PA set up I know that there is something that can take that focus away." Inclusivity is a big deal in the music world, something The Big Issue identified by including Gig Buddies in our 2019 Changemakers list for their work in allowing volunteers to team up with people who have learning disabilities to accompany them to concerts. And the ability to meet other gig-goers has been life-changing. "Without music I think I would be a recluse. I'd really struggle making friends and forming bonds with people because I find social situations difficult," Johns says. "I gradually found myself being inter-connected with lots of different micro-scenes within Bristol. It helped me get over my social anxieties because then I know that in between bands I can talk to people and I'd often find that we would have a shared love or a shared hate." When you're waiting for the first set to start this summer, think about how reaching out to other gig-goers could help change the tune. Source: The Big Issue (paper edition)
  17. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    It's very important to try and understand your thought processes and why everything is as it is. Doing this took a lot of pressure off me. It seems I've managed autism better lately by understanding my weaknesses and strengths. My biggest weaknesses are low physical motivation and a far greater drive to "just think". That means just a textbook and lots of coffee. There is never any short term objective or idea of planned activity. There is a distant longer term goal of just getting as good as I can get. All of it is vague and mentally based. Whereas normality is to base all your study efforts on organised, staged goals (exams) and a view to a job. Ironically though, this weird situation gives me clear advantages. Neurotypicals tend to be so collectively meshed they tend to gravitate towards the obvious. They seem lost without courses or tutorials or agendas planned by others. Therefore they miss a lot of detail and tend to pass by whatever never in fact lost any relativity. Being autistic isn't so bad if you get aware of the pros and the cons. If you can make efforts to improve on the negative traits there is some light at the end of the tunnel.
  18. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    One big problem I have is a lesser known autistic symptom of lack of systematization or short term purpose or concept of beginning and end. Also lack of will to do physical aspects of an interest. Due to all of the above I "read and analyse" far more than I physically work on projects. Due to this I tend to draw more diagrams and maths, because theory alone is a hard way to learn. Concentration has to be very intense. As Grigory Perelman stated, time is of no importance. To get depth you need to analyse slowly. Although I can't compare my own problems with Perelman's maths I find it works for me in as much as I do solve my maths problems each time. I will stare at the problem and play it over again and again. In the past I made the mistake of sharing a problem on forums but it inspired ridicule. I felt too people were unsettled by any question that threatened a basic understanding. So now I will struggle on my own. It's all so theoretical it becomes removed from practicality as many of my problems relate to more dated technology. I have a knack for applying myself to stuff that no longer interests the majority. I am aware though theory has limits. What I do resembles learning precisely a language but never speaking it. In fact I did once meet an autistic language sthdent who studied all day and night but never spoke his chosen language. Instead he just made tables and lists and memorized obscure words.
  19. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    I think "scientist" is O.K. as a general term for someone who researches a science. For example, there were amateur radio enthusiasts who contributed to the field. Einstein likewise studied but worked as an accountant. So long as generally people aren't led to assume the scientists is being paid by a department.
  20. Sanctuary

    Intelligence

    Your point about speed of processing is a very good one and where many autistic people struggle. They may have the skills (academic or practical) but struggle when asked to act quickly, especially if it involves "improvising" rather than using an established procedure. Time limits by themselves may not be the problem - the demand for speed or very quick responses is more of an issue. When I was in education I managed well with exams lasting hours but more recently have encountered tests just lasting a few minutes and found them far more difficult and think this may be true more widely for those with autism. In very short tests the tasks may be relatively simple but the short time span demands very quick thinking which creates its own demands. By contrast longer exams or assignments allow much more time for planning and organising and to really think through responses. The autistic mind tends to be attuned to nuance and variation and be uneasy with a demand for quick, simple answers. More broadly it's important to recognise there are many different types of intelligence of which academic intelligence is only one (albeit a "privileged" one in our societies). Therefore it is quite possible for someone to be academically talented and have poor practical skills and vice versa. Even the division between "academic" and "practical" is simplistic as there are many different forms of academic and practical intelligence. A strong performer at Maths can struggle with Biology or History and vice versa while the person who is skilled at car mechanics struggles at decorating or cooking. Experience and anxiety also though play key roles and sometimes apparent lack of ability or intelligence is more related to lack of experience, lack of confidence and sometimes lack of support than actual lack of skills. This may be particularly true for those with autism who feel anxiety about doing new things - when they attempt these things lack of experience and anxiety may lead to poor performance which doesn't relate to their real potential. As a final point there is also "social intelligence" and some use the term "emotional intelligence". Once again these may bear little relation to academic and practical intelligences. It is probably social and emotional intelligence where autistic individuals struggle the most although even in those cases lack of experience (or past negative experience) and anxiety may suggest skills are weaker than they are in reality.
  21. EccentricChemist

    Intelligence

    I like your last sentence in this post where you said everyone needs to find their strengths, I've said in a simpler way that everyone needs to find their thing whatever that means to them, for me my thing is science, chemistry in particular.As for speed of information processing, when I'm around people I often lose my words, or say somthing awkward, only to "find" them later on usually after the interaction is over and i'm going over it in my head. It's really frustrating when this happens, but I think I'm pretty intelligent and do well on non timed iq tests, but score really badly on the timed ones. I think speed of processing is not as relevant to iq as is solving the problem. I'm certainly not claiming to be any elite scientist, I really don't like calling myself a scientist sounds kind of arrogant to me. But I am a pretty good chemist, and feel very lucky to have found my thing.
  22. Dr-David-Banner

    Intelligence

    So as not to hijack other threads, I figured I'll start a new one with reference to what I was discussing with Sanctuary. Namely, speed of information processing as it's related by popular opinion to intelligence. Not only that, but I think we ought to think a lot more about intelligence as it relates to H.F.A. and A.S. The other night happened to watch a really great DVD film (starring Henry Winkler). It was a film I picked up for 25 pence at a charity shop and it was about air-traffic control and how demanding the job is. As I watched the movie, I really became aware of how hopeless I'd be in such a job and the carnage that would follow were I put in charge of the aircraft runway co-ordination network. There is no way I could think that fast and also I think the time/spatial factor that relates to our condition would render me useless in that job. The truth is, even in a job that doesn't demand anything like that level of skill, I spent most of my life being shown the door. I have a few friends who work in retail and I'm amazed by how easily they scan goods, swipe cards, deal with customers and handle the stress quite naturally. Recently one very good description I found of early childhood autism by Kagan was (it was noted) autistic infants somehow fail to respond to external stimulate (from mother or parents). It was noted that such children didn't react normally so we can assume they sort of contracted inwardly, refusing to make contact with the world. If this condition continues to manifest itself, the result will be obvious educational/formative problems. This is because the usual, communicative system of passing on information is "cut-off". I should add here that not all autistics experience this to the degree their whole school years are disrupted, although it's true to say "all" Hans Asperger's patients were un-teachable at school. Those elite scientists we have suspected of autism (such as Einstein) actually did far better at school that folklore has us believe. Most of these elite but cranky inventors and physicists may have had issues with certain subjects but (unlike Asperger's children), Einstein for example got good grades in subjects like French. To be honest, I haven't yet found a single elite scientist who was totally hopeless at school, with the exception of great musicians like John Lennon who was un-teachable and always fighting and clowning about. Here is what I see tends to happen: Actual high-functioning-autism will be hugely disruptive throughout school but I often hear of people who later in life discovered they could compensate by learning to process information differently. Some autists may remain hopeless at maths and sports but suddenly find they can learn to play piano or guitar in a fraction of the time it would take a "normal" person. This is especially the case with Schizophrenia. What Asperger wanted to do was to create special schools that would use very different teaching methods for autistic kids so they could develop their particular skills. The USSR did develop such schools but I always found the psychiatrists tended to always look down their noses at these children as sort of "limited" to always spotting trains or listing Latin names. Only Asperger concluded there was some connection between elite scientists' thought processes and the children he treated in the clinic. In some ways, to my mind the basis of the Asperger puzzle is kind of obvious. If you add together the negative traits such as physical dexterity, manual skills and co-ordination, motor clumsiness, it becomes clear people with this condition may be better geared for theoretical, abstract sciences. Activities that demand a lot of slow, deep thinking and obsessive levels of concentration. The negative perception of people on the spectrum by some former psychiatrists I think is rooted in the fact that vast amounts of knowledge also requires participation and experience to then be able to show some evidence of your ability. There is this old saying about elite physicists who can carry out complex calculations but can't fix a leaking tap or change a bulb. That doesn't mean, however, that philosophy and maths and theory is useless. I think it does mean it's a good idea to figure out what your strengths are and with many autists it has less to do with navigating aircrafts in a busy, hectic control centre.
  23. Dr-David-Banner

    Why do others here seem Neurotypical-like at times?

    Today I was as often thinking deep and slow. The comical side of it is I was studying in an old textbook how to deduce the internal resistance of a milliameter. To be frank, this is as complex as it's useless. On a forum people would frown and ask what the point is. You can buy a digital meter made in China that you can just use. Only engineers in the 1940s used analogue moving coil meters, combined with maths application. Yet, I thrive on the challenge. I learned with HFA it is common to find people who will study an old washing machine for hours, memorizing the pulleys, diaphragms and cogs. It's also an old wives tale to assume we are just oddballs who in fact lack "practical and proper knowledge" of the subject. I can admit though my deep thinking is indeed totally useless and unwanted in modern times. And yet, if you take another perspective these weird analytical activities create far deeper understanding of a sphere of interest. Now, Einstein in his way was more realistic than your average HFA geek. Relativity is an important discovery in physics. Perelman also persevered in an area of maths that at least interested other mathematicians. Despite that, there is still the element of deep and slow thought process. I find elite scientists to be similar to autists in such ways except maybe many autists over focus on obscurity to the point they remain dismissed as hugely eccentric or plain OCD. Also though I think any time grinding the brain cells is better than spending hours socialising and just passing the day. I also believe in general people do a lot but think, nowhere near enough.
  24. This question of speed of thinking - or ultimately speed of response as that is what others tend to notice - is a very interesting one. As you suggest there is often an assumption that someone who is slow in their response is slow-witted or ponderous. Sometimes this is true but often it reflects a person who realises the need to think fully before responding or making a decision, who realises that matters can be complicated and deserve a considered response. Negative judgements of those who take time to respond can unfortunately lead to rushed and bad decision-making. In fairness I think we are all guilty of these judgements from time to time. We get impatient with someone who responds slowly or assume they lack ability - sometimes we are right but our impatience and negative conclusions can ultimately lead us to be on the wrong end of rushed, ill-considered actions by others. The psychologist Daniel Kahneman devised the concepts of fast and slow thinking. We all engage in both to varying degrees. Fast thinking is required when we have to make instant or near-instant decisions and clearly it is often necessary and very useful. For example a football referee has to make instant decisions on whether or not a foul occurred. Conversations also rely on responding quickly - imagine the awkwardness of a conversation where one participant takes more than a few seconds to reply. Slow thinking can be used for non-urgent or very difficult decisions. While fast thinking is a necessary skill it can result in bad decisions - sometimes simply through mistakes but the requirement for speed can also lead to unimaginative decisions simply repeating past actions. More worryingly fast thinking often falls back - subconsiously - on preconceptions and stereotypes or being influenced by the mood of the time. Slow thinking should be more considered, less prone to error, lack of imagination and less prejudiced although none of these things are guaranteed. Modern life does seem to have a distinct preference for speed and this has brought us many benefits in terms of getting quicker service. However quicker service is not always better service. There are times when we need to slow down and provide more time for things to be done, particularly if we want to avoid stereotypical and unfair decisions.
  25. Dr-David-Banner

    Why do others here seem Neurotypical-like at times?

    I found one achilles heel on technical engineering forums that led me to drop using them, more or less. I found there were members who would abandon their point of view if this would maintain their reputation. Reputation mattered more than the subject matter. I could never admit to any idea on the basis of whether said view is popular. What matters above all is whether an interpretation is factually correct. If the mathematics works and something can be explained with quotes and examples, it seems crazy to me to step back because someone might get offended. One big advantage with autism is we tend to favour facts and data over emotions and sensitivities. There's a terrific film called Contact where two scientists are juxtaposed. At the top is a guy who ridiculed SETI as a waste of talent and time. Then there is a female scientist who is actively running a radiotelescope SETI program. When she unexpectedly receives a signal from Vega, the other more respected scientist muscles his way in takes credit. He uses his instinctive knowledge to convince government and press he was the brains behind the discovery. Many times I've heard experienced people state it's always third rankers who rise to elite positions in most fields - especially government.
  26. Dr-David-Banner

    Why do others here seem Neurotypical-like at times?

    Einstein had this basic idea I tried out myself over the years and I found he was totally right. It really works. You have to keep questioning all the time and the more you question, the more you have to "think" to obtain the answers. I notice on lots of science forums hardly anyone frames a solid question. Understanding is just assumed and (very worryingly) those who ask questions may be patronised or, in rarer cases, called "stupid". Some time ago on one forum I had this "rank beginner" rating and pretty low feedback. Very low, I should say. This was brought about as I asked questions and it was just assumed only novices throw out questions. Sometimes the autistic brain learns in reverse so there's no direct order in how information is assimilated. I finally had to stop asking these questions on forums as they got deeper and more into physics but still I haven't stopped making questions. Einstein's next tip was explanation. You understand something truly when you can explain it to child and the child is able to follow. Here Einstein was probably thinking what really matters is "understanding" and not impressive sounding terminology. Outside of science I always admired Einstein for his views in general and here was a man who made the general public see physics as cool. We don't know if Einstein was autistic but his thought processes were highly individualistic. The other fascinating tip I got was from reclusive Jewish/Russian mathematician Grigory Perelman. He shared that his thought processes were deep and SLOW. That caught my attention as society idealises the ability to think quickly. It's the perspective of not thinking quickly that people label as stupid. Here though is a real riddle to ponder. Almost a majority of autistics such as myself were born with dominant linguistic intelligence yet under-developed mathematical and spatial. They call it maths impairement. I still experience dyscalculia even though I do a lot of maths. I found maths will develop if you work at it.
  27. Dr-David-Banner

    Why do others here seem Neurotypical-like at times?

    I would these days stick to my somewhat provocative line that autism characteristics and abstract science are connected. I am swayed that the greatest scientific advances were never made in any classroom or collective. It boiled down to the "associative horizon" Paul Cooijman mentioned often. This is ability to see connections and patterns as opposed to concrete facts. In fact I'm convinced Hans Asperger was the only researcher who understood some parallel between autism and abstract science. Practically all other researchers from Leo Kanner to Van Krevelin tended to view autistic kids as eloquent dullards. There is the point though, how come so many autistic people do not whiz through exams or have success in some field? Simple answer: Autism is a hugely stressful condition so 90 per cent of us remain bogged down by anxiety over what we can't do. There are no special schools. Hell, even dyslexic John Lennon resented for decades the failure by his school to get him into arts. Some of us are at odds with family, unsettled at school, "programmed" to view success in social terms. However it was Tesla himself who stated isolation is the key to inventiveness. Really it's time to question the priority given to "social virtue" just as Socrates questioned the elitist education in Ancient Athens as a lone philosopher. Anyone who reads Paul Cooijman will find he writes of this often.
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