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Asperger's Related Content

Showing topics in Symptoms & Diagnosis, Friendships & Relationships, Education & Work, Help & Resources and Medication & Therapy posted in for the last 365 days.

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  1. Yesterday
  2. Max000

    Worst subjects at school - relationship to AS?

    I had a lot of worst subjects. My typical grades in school were like this. Art: A PE: C Everything else: D or F My reading ability was terrible, and didn't improve until I got some Special Ed classes in the 7th grade. Since in Elementary School I couldn't even read the material to study it, even the classes I liked, like History and Science, were a complete disaster. When my reading ability improved enough I started to read a lot. So I could read the text books. But my writing ability was still bad. Even if I learned the material, my teachers didn't try to decipher my bad English and spelling, so they just marked it all wrong. In High School, I loaded up my schedule with as many Art and PE classes as I could take. Because at least I knew I could pass Art and PE. I was not great at PE, but I enjoyed it. Everybody got at least a C, just for showing up for PE. My problems in High School started when I started to run out of Art and PE classes to take, and had to take harder subjects. Then I just gave up and dropped out. Eventually I enrolled in an Adult High School where I had more basic skills classes, which made me a lot more literate, and I was able to graduate. My typical grades in school were
  3. Dr-David-Banner

    Differences: Autism/Schizoid Type

    Quite complex really. The modern definition of schizoid personality I think changed from its more dated use. I have my own conception of schizoid type simply based on the term itself. My guess is "schizoid" is borderline schizophrenia and a form of high functioning autism. I knew a teenager in Spain who was identical to myself but his autism manifested itself by his unwillingness to communicate with others. He always wandered about reading grammar books (English) but ignored others and refused to chat. His parents sent him to a psychologist. My autism is different altogether. I do communicate with others, even joke and show signs opposite to being shy. However I cannot genuinely connect with others on a deeper emotional level. There is like a glass partition. I don't like being with people all the time and need my own space. I hate working with other people unless it's those I know well. Sometimes I notice I can swing towards schizoid symptoms and become moody, more anti social but overall I don't see myself as schizoid type. Ultimately I am very inward but will still often talk to people quite freely. I am not very good at this though and come across as plain odd and one-sided in conversation. I also don't smile hardly or get included by groups (they talk as if I'm not there). Autism though may differ in how you interpret it.
  4. Heather

    crisis period and school

    I agree with @Willow and @Nesf about making a list. I remember when I got overwhelmed at university, it was so helpful to make a list of everything I had to do and break it down into when things are due and assess the priority level of each item and then assign something to each of you for each week or each part of the project. When I did a group project at university, it was really helpful to have a shared 'google document' where we could work together from our own homes. We still had to sometimes get together outside of class to work on aspects of the project, depending on the particular project.
  5. Nesf

    crisis period and school

    @Willow has excellent advice - meet your partner and make a list, put the high priority items at the top of the list, start with those and tick them off as you do them. Plan who is going to do which tasks. I often do this to help me with daily living, so I don't become overwhelmed by the many tasks I need to get through in a day. It also gives a tremendous feeling of satisfaction and progress when you tick things off the list.
  6. Last week
  7. Willow

    crisis period and school

    I understand how much of a struggle this can be. At college last year our tutor would give us assignments the day before they were due and it was very stressful. The best way I've found to cope is to break everything down into smaller, manageable parts, and create a list of the order you need to do things in. Do an item on the list, have a short break doing something that you find relaxing, do the next item, have a break, and so on until you have ticked all the items on the list off. Since you have a partner, I assume you are working together on all of this, so either - meet up and break the work down and make the to-do list together, and each take parts away to do, or, if you prefer to be in control, make the list yourself and tell them which bits to work on. It seems simple, but I find it can really help me to feel organised enough to make a start. You can also, whilst making the list, prioritise which tasks are the most important, so if you don't manage to get through them all, the last tasks aren't vital for handing in to your teacher. Sometimes, we over perfect our work, and we can get away with doing much less and still pass. So try to go over everything once in less detail than you would normally, and if you have time, go over again and add more details - if you don't have time to go over it again, you still have a completed project to hand in, which is better than nothing at all. I hope this is understandable enough for you, let me know if something doesn't make sense due to our language differences!
  8. Nallaa

    crisis period and school

    Hello, I'm not an official Aspie, but I woud like some advises regarding to my new school semester : I'm very very mentally tired since 2 weeks with my exams and other things, and especially now, and my teachers annouced us we have 5 group presentations to manage for this beginning of semester, which is way too much for me to manage at once, specially knowing I'm already on the edge of doing meltdowns. My partner is my friend and I don't want to let him down because he has bad scores and I have good ones, he is really counting on me (which is even more stressfull), but I'm already quite overwhelmed whereas it didn't start yet. Because I'm not diagnosed and never talked about this to my friends (which are not very close friends) I'm not feeling comfortable enough to tell them. I have the feeling that actually I don't have the right to ask anything to anybody.. Teachers don't want to let us working alone because they think it's not fair leting someone having more rights than the others (like not working in pairs). I don't see what I could do ? I really prefer to avoid letting my friend down, I would like him to go in an other group (they would be 3) and me alone, but I can't Do you have any advise for me ?
  9. Myrtonos

    Worst subjects at school - relationship to AS?

    Have you ever heard of Marie Curie or Emmy Noether before? And I understand it was men who thought that. At that time, gender-segregated societies were practically universal, this was at a time when there was more cultural diversity than today. I get the impression that may have been tomboys in the middle ages who could no more be made to believe that a virgin could give birth, let alone to a boy, or the resurrection of Jesus than tomboys on the spectrum living today could. But if there were, say, a "Temple Gradin" at that time, she was marginalised and persecuted for refusing to accept things like that.
  10. Willow

    Chatbots/apps for autistic adults?

    I wasn't aware this was a thing at all, to be honest (specifically for people with Autism, anyway), but it sounds like a really good idea - I can see why they aim them at children, and it's great that this is available for kids on the spectrum, but it would be nice to think they could accommodate adults as well. I had an app once called 'Replika' and you can name your 'bot' something and talk to it. It can help with anxiety and things. https://replika.ai/ But other than that one which I've personally tried, here is a list of AI apps that will talk back to you with their main goal usually being to maintain the conversation with you - so even though they're not specifically for Autism/Asperger's, they could still work: https://chatbotslife.com/top-chatbot-apps-winning-strategies-and-lessons-to-learn-cb48942c0068
  11. I was just wondering, there are chatbots or apps for autistic adults? I was thinking about this the other day, as most of my issues revolve around not being able to maintain a conversation or even identify what I'm feeling. A chatbot that can simulate a conversation with a stranger, and offer tips or conversation starters would really be helpful. But when I looked on the play store, the vast majority of apps are aimed at autistic children to assist learning. Does anyone use any apps which they find useful?
  12. I loved these practical subjects! I loved anything that involved making things, experiments, practical work. The only problem I had was that I was slow and never managed to finish the projects in time before the class moved onto something else. Another problem I often had was with being organised, as I was supposed to tell my parents about these lessons so that they could buy me the things I needed, but I never remembered to do so until the last minute. Luckily, when I was at school, these classes with mixed gender. I would hate to have to only do cookery or needlework, and not be given the chance to do woodwork or metalwork. I wonder, how did girls on the spectrum like me cope with such a gender-segregated society as existed in Victorian times? To think that until fairly recently, they were considered incapable of scientific or logical thought, not allowed to to go to university, or to work except in the few professions that were deemed to be suitable for them. I don't think that I'd have coped at all.
  13. Sanctuary

    Worst subjects at school - relationship to AS?

    I hated Woodwork, Metalwork and Technical Drawing. I was at school in the days when the craft subjects were gender-segregated so boys had to do those subjects while girls had to do Cooking and Needlework (as they were then called). However in Year 7 everyone did get a chance to do all the subjects. In our first half-term we did Needlework. I remember it took me ages to work out what I was supposed to be doing (even though it was probably obvious to most students). However things then clicked, I worked things out and I was really enjoying the lessons and then frustratingly we were moved on to another subject. Looking back Needlework was the only craft subject I enjoyed at school and I wish I'd had more opportunity to do it. If I had my time in school again I would approach these subjects very differently and really want to learn them. I have poor practical skills and would really like the opportunity to learn and improve them as they can be very useful. Our attitudes do change over time and there are many examples of adults who develop a renewed interest in a subject or education in general after hating it, doing badly in it or being written-off by teachers of the day as being "useless" or "unmotivated". I suppose a lot of the change is just about maturing and being out of the school environment allows a fresh perspective on learning.
  14. Myrtonos

    I dislike explaining things

    It is like knowing that a equals b, that b equals c, but having no sense that a equals c. @Spiderman0_2, @spiderwoman0_2 and @Rhys do any of you have something to say on this? I myself am often unsure how I am supposed to explain something that others mysteriously don't take into account.
  15. My school day was as follows: Registration into periods 1 and 2, which was basically me listening to music (I had long hair from 2002 to 2005 so I could conceal earbuds easily ) Periods 3 and 4 - out through the gate and down to the skate park. Lunch - I had a free voucher, so I figured I'd at least fill up on hotdogs before sitting my one and only period for the day (the last lesson was usually P.E, art, or some other lesson where I could mooch about and procrastinate. (Shame, because I could outplay most of my school on the football field and had an 80mph bowl - couldn't bat for shit though) So really, my worst subjects were ones where any of the above went wrong.
  16. collectingrocks

    Worst subjects at school - relationship to AS?

    Believe it or not I just don't "do" maths. I just can't understand it. And yes, I hated PE and having to get into showers with the other boys
  17. Peanut butter for me Oddly, I like peanuts and I like butter...must be whatever else they sling in the jar...
  18. Rhys

    Relationships with an NT

    Sorry Harrow, i didnt see your reply. Well tbh its quite difficult for me to notice that Willow suffers from Aspergers, im not sure if thats because ive become used to the way she behaves or whether it just because its not that noticable. I think time is a big factor in your decision to tell her about your aspergers or not, if you have been together quite a long time then my opionion would be to tell her, whats the worst that can happen?, but eventually it will come out one way or another :). Just do what you think is right for your relationship, its cliche, but follow your heart. Rhys
  19. Willow

    Worst subjects at school - relationship to AS?

    I think my worst subject was PE, mostly because I didn't like having to get changed in front of the other girls, but also because I was never picked for team sports so it just emphasised my differences and lack of friends when the teacher had to put me in a team and people sighed. It was easier at the last school that I attended because I did make some friends, but I was still bad a sport due to coordination difficulties. Never ask me to run As for the other subjects, I don't have another that stands out as one that I struggled with. I enjoyed the practical lessons such as woodwork, cooking and sewing, even though I wasn't amazing at them, though I did persevere with cooking and sewing and now I can say that I'm fairly okay at both!
  20. Harrow

    Relationships with an NT

    I'm in a releationship with a neurotypical woman, we fight a lot and we disagree about everything, but somehow through that we're perfect I love her more then anything and I know she loves me and we're close to marriage. I know that sounds counterproductive fighting, I grew up in a an abusive home so it should be the last thing I want. But its more we're both really strong people and opininonated and we have out our careers and studies and we have to make time for each other. Also we are both from completely diffrent cultures and languages so its difficult working out how the other one wil react to certain things, because we are so diffrent. But my question is she has never mentioned that I seem diffrent or I have quirks or noticed I'm diffrent at all and I have never mentioned Aspergers to her and I'm not sure if I ever want to. What is your opinions on that? From a neurotypical stand point
  21. Myrtonos

    Worst subjects at school - relationship to AS?

    Oh so a secular school, or at least one that claims to be secular, only taught Christianity.
  22. It was a state school, not a Christian one, though the students in it's cachement area were predominently Christian. School use to start with Assembly, where students were made to recite the Lord's prayer. Nowadays, they have scrapped this in favour of more secular teaching, I suppose in recognition of the fact that the Uk is, in fact, a multiculteral society.
  23. Sanctuary

    Relationships with an NT

    "Never say never" is good advice in relationships or any other activity. Who knows what the future will bring and what seems impossible or unthinkable at one time seems the best way forward or even essential or inevitable at a later point. Much better for someone to say they don't expect to do something in the future or they think it's unlikely but "never" is almost always going too far and we often see people doing things that they said would never do again.
  24. RiRi

    Relationships with an NT

    I know an aspie who says they will never be in a relationship but they've also said they would never x and now maybe be in the works of doing x. If I live to old age, I will get to see if the aspie was just really rigid in thinking, they've changed their point of view or that they truly felt that way regarding relationships.
  25. @Tylermc I don't like pineapples too. I think the juice can be okay but pineapples can be hard and they sting or something, if that makes any sense. Also, where have you been?
  26. Dr-David-Banner

    Autism in children / autism in adults

    Sanctuary, this may be of interest to you: "It will be seen that the description of Asperger's syndrome is substantially similar to the picture in some relatively intelligent individuals with a diagnosis of infantile autism.Indeed, Asperger originally believed that people with his syndrome were of high intelligence. What stands out as different from infantile autism is the superficially normal early language development. The term, Asperger's syndrome, therefore proposes that there are a group of individuals who have a disorder of social development similar to that found in infantile autism, but with a pattern of early language development that appears grossly normal; at least as regards the milestones that are usually recorded. More able autistic individuals who develop language move from no language at age 3 to quite extensive use of speech which, as in Asperger's syndrome, is used in a grammatical but one sided and literal fashion. The suggestion is that there are parallels in function in the areas of social interaction, communication, and obsessional interests and activities. Those of low ability, or those of higher ability at an earlier stage of development show aloofness, no language, and simple repetitive activities. More able individuals, particularly at a later stage of development, display a more elaborate picture of social ineptness, circumscribed interests, and concrete egocentric use of language. This analysis could be seen to reinforce the notion that Asperger's syndrome is no more than high functioning autism. There are individuals, however, with autistic social development who have appreciably abnormal early language development including a significant delay in comprehension of speech, who subsequently attain to a high functioning picture. There are others, also high functioning, who do not have a history of abnormal early language development, at least in a gross sense. Considerable progress has been made in trying to understand the nature of the psychological processes which are dysfunctional in childhood autism. Two main views are, on the one hand that there is a deficit in the innate ability to interact emotionally with others, and on the other an impairment in the cognitive process of metarepresentation."
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