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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/14/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    hello i am returning after about 8 months. not sure if i will stay but for now hello.
  2. 2 points
    (Not written by me) ‘With Asperger’s you put on a mask to pretend you’re normal’: Daniel Lightwing on how the film of his life helps take the stigma out of autism Londoner Daniel Lightwing was an outsider at school but maths helped him find a job at Google — and love. He talks with Susannah Butter about the film of his life Susannah Butter 19 March 2015 In any conversation about the modern workplace Google is held up as the ideal. But when Daniel Lightwing worked there as a web developer he was not happy. “I have a problem with office culture,” says the 26-year-old, who was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome — now simply known as an autistic spectrum disorder — marked by difficulties with social interaction and non-verbal communication. “I ate lunch by myself to avoid people talking about things that were not work-related. The more I did stuff like that the more people rejected me.” School was worse. “I didn’t go to lunch because I wouldn’t know where to sit or what to say, so I didn’t eat. I was really skinny and when my dad found out he was furious.” Lightwing’s feelings are expressed in the new film X+Y, which is based on his story. Director Morgan Matthews had the idea when he met Lightwing filming 2007 BBC documentary Beautiful Young Minds, about the International Maths Olympiad (IMO). X+Y’s protagonist, Nathan Ellis (Asa Butterfield), is lonely and bullied at school. His life changes when he is chosen to represent Great Britain at the IMO in China where he falls in love with a girl who helps him connect with society, and his mother. “I cried the first three times I watched it. It says things I was feeling but could not express,” says Lightwing. He speaks softly, making eye contact occasionally before looking back down at his bitten fingernails. His maths workings on a sheet of paper appear in the film. “My cameo,” he smiles. As in X+Y, he fell in love with a Chinese girl and married her. Yan Zhu has a stake in the film but they are no longer together. “She ran away back to China one day when I was working at Google and I never saw her again. I don’t have a positive impression of her now, what she did was cruel.” He stops. Talking about it hurts his current girlfriend’s feelings. “I live with my new girlfriend, which is why it is awkward.” She is also Chinese. They met “at a Chinese gathering” and live in Baker Street. He orders a hot chocolate, admitting: “I find drink orders awkward. In social situations I’m often thinking about what is going on in that person’s mind. It’s like my brain is overheating.” Lightwing was not diagnosed with Asperger’s until he was 16. He grew up in York, the oldest of six children. “I didn’t have a brilliant childhood. There was an emphasis on being social at school and my parents wanted me to be normal.” In X+Y, Nathan’s father dies when he is a child — Lightwing’s real-life father, who is very much alive, has taken it with good humour. “My Dad was frustrated with me when I was young because he is a GP and his job is about empathising with people. He said: ‘Even if you are not interested you should show that you are. That’s the most important skill in life’. For me that is like teaching university maths to a little child.” Today Lightwing can understand his father’s pain but says “as a child he would ask me to do something simple like buy something from the shop for him and I would panic. I know how to ask but if they say something I don’t expect, what do I say next?” His mother, a science teacher, began to research Asperger’s after reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time and took him to a specialist. “Being diagnosed meant I didn’t feel I had to try and change. You just have different strengths.” Competitive maths and a teacher spotting his potential also helped. “Everything got better after the competition. I felt more self-respect and part of a community — there were people like me I could relate to better than those in my school and family.” He read maths at Trinity College, Cambridge, which was “much easier than school, socially. I didn’t feel bullied and was free. One problem was that I lost interest in maths a bit.” After his degree he lived in China, where “they are more respectful to academically talented people”, and would have stayed had Google not offered him a job “building cool things to make people think Google is good” — such as developing the 3D museum viewer for company’s Art Project. Were there others at Google with Asperger’s? “Of course. Asperger’s is more common than you think. There are definitely politicians with it.” He describes his disorder as “an extremely different kind of personality. I wouldn’t call it a disability. When you have Asperger’s you are putting on a mask and trying to pretend you are normal but what you are thinking is not normal. “People with autism have polarised emotions. If it gets too much you withdraw from everything. It is called social hangover. There were times at school where I was overloaded. I’d try to run away. If I couldn’t escape I would explode.” His social struggle at Google and school did not come through a lack of willing. “Sometimes I do want to join in with other people but I’m too shy. Sometimes, though, I don’t know what to say when it is not work-related.” Google eventually “became boring”. Now he uses his programming skills in financial arbitrage and betting but becomes evasive when I ask him about it. Does he work to make it better? “It is less ethical than that. I am part of a betting syndicate. It’s secret.” This job suits him because, “In many companies the only way to make money is to rise in the management. I don’t have the ability to do that.” How should we treat those with Asperger’s? “There is too much emphasis on changing people or helping them fit in.” When he was younger, he admits he was violent, biting or kicking his peers and teachers. “That violence should not be punished because generally we are having strong emotions and there is nothing you can do about it. More should be done to avoid these situations. You can’t treat autistic children as though they’re doing something that’s unreasonable because to them it isn’t.” Medication isn’t a solution. “There was a phase where people thought Asperger’s needed to be cured but people with such a focus on systems and patterns probably came up with most inventions in history.” Alcohol helps: “I stop thinking and can say what I want.” When he wants to “act normal” he thinks about “if I have been in a similar situation before and know what to say or how I should act.” If he could wake up one morning and not have Asperger’s, would he want to? “No. I would feel really sad. I might not be good at what I enjoy.” When he is older he would like to have children. “If they had Asperger’s I’d know what to do. I don’t think I’d mind either way, it is just a different way of seeing the world, but I’d want to diagnose it early. It’s not nice going through 15 years of prison.” The maths competition crew still meet up to play poker. Lightwing is happiest doing “computer things and China things”. Going out is, “OK. I used to be afraid but now I have friends who are not Asperger’s and I’m able to.” X+Y is a milestone because, he says, “it is about how there are lots of different kinds of people, how they are valuable, can do great things and be part of society. It shows Asperger’s in a good light but there are comedy elements that make it a film for everyone to enjoy.” Source: Evening Standard
  3. 2 points
    I would never voluntarily give up anything that brings me happiness on account of my age. It may be inevitable that some activities which require a certain level of physical fitness will become less feasibile over time, but I intend to stick with my hobbies and interests for as long as they continue to satisfy me.
  4. 2 points
    I really disagree with this - this is autism discrimination. Plenty of autistic people have difficulty controlling facial expressions, have facial tics, or just dont conform to the socially accepted facial expressions, especially when getting sensory overwhelm (like when giving global speeches..) - they should still be accepted just as they are by people/society and able to pursue their dreams and goals without hatred, bullying, and discrimination. People know shes autistic, and need to get over it and understand she doesnt mean what those expressions 'normally' mean. Saying she should try harder misses the point - its just the same as telling someone to suppress their stims. The high pressure to always be conforming to NT standards, to be perfectly 'masking' (imitating a neurotypical) - is doing double the work, effort and stress and is exactly what leads to autism burnout. Its also why there is such a high unemployment rate, university dropout, and suicide rate - a lack of accepting autistic people for how they are. But no-one tells Kodi Lee that he should change his face and expressions to be accepted and able to follow his dreams, so its either bias/lack of understanding around some autistic symptoms and not others or just a sexist thing - or that Greta is challenging those in power benefiting from the current toxically capitalistic economy. "Noone is more hated than he who speaks the truth" - Plato.
  5. 1 point
    I have Asperger Syndrome, and PTSD and stand out for it... And when people are high on marijuana, they're not thinking.. Current research suggests that chronic marijuana users have lower cognitive function, and lower socioeconomic class.. Both of these create a threat to somebody with Asperger Syndrome. I bought these to protect myself against the social ills that marijuana might have in store for me. Taser Pulse, connected to my cell phone that automatically calls the police when fired. Sabre Police Grade Pepper Spray. Sabre Dog Spray. Monadnock Collapsible police baton. Sabre Personal alarm. Sabre Wireless home security alarm system. Sabre Window Glass Alarm Sabre Motion Detector. Wireless CCTV home surveillance. ADT lifeshield home surveillance system, 14 piece..connected to my smartphone and to the Police. I have all of these as a self Defense Package.
  6. 1 point
    that sounds awesome! people always want to doubt you for whatever reason and it feels amazing when you show them otherwise
  7. 1 point
    I got a job at burger king, saved up $8,000. Got my CDL with Airbrakes endorsement. Went to truck driving school. Bought a business license and got a City, State and local tax ID number.. Bought a Caterpillar work Uniform. Went to ryder transportation services.. Leased a Freightliner 18 wheeler with a sleeper cab. Insurance included in the lease. Maintenance included in the lease. Went to my sister mae, who knows trucking and knows truck drivers and knows how to get business in it.. And just started trucking for myself. My sister started yelling at me.. Saying I have no experience what the he'll are you doing ? I told her.. Ahhh Shaddap!!!! I went to Driving school.. I did what I gotta do. That's what I did... Now get me business... For the most money that you can get for me... and I'll give you a piece of it. She got me a bunch of deliveries.. I made 6 deliveries so far. When I got back home.... My sister asked me what kind of crazy son of a biatch are you..lol I said.. One of a kind. Lmfao !
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    Just wondering if anyone else with an android phone uses google routines? I just found it about a month ago for the morning one. Basically, by saying "OK Google, good morning" it will read today's weather, tell you about traffic on your way to work/school, turn on/off lights or set thermostat (if you have compatible devices), tell you about today's calendar, and even play short snippets from news stations. All of these can be turned on or off and arranged in an order. The reason I bring it up is because one of the news stations I have it play is one called "Spectrum Autism Research". It actually has some very interesting information on autism. It doesn't update every day, more like once a week but still cool to stay informed on a lot of stuff. One example of a topic was how Autism and Alexithymia are related but necessarily inherent to each other, or how autistic people do feel empathy like normal people but don't necessarily know how to personally relate or properly show it. It is very interesting stuff if you ask me. Just wanted to let others know
  10. 1 point
    there was a news story where I live about a woman that turned 100 yrs old and she still goes bowling despite her age I will never give up playing golf and soccer and swimming and paddle boarding and painting and drawing ‘and playing the drums
  11. 1 point
    I'm wired that way to go off topic but will try to stay on course. The subject of dreams has many ramifications. The bad side for me is OHS. The bright side is I can solve complex maths problems sleeping. Everything slows down. I wake up and jot it down and the formula works. I have a song I dreamed and recorded during the following day. I have it on my audio files, lyrics and all.
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
    It was somewhat abstract, which I like. The drawing isn't perfectly realistic, the the message is. Her wide-eyed expression seems both surprised and curious at the same time.
  14. 1 point
    In the beginning, everything was perfect & all was peace and joy. Then Lucifer, the covering cherub became proud and coveted the worship and authority that was God's alone (Isaiah 14:12-14. In Ezekiel 28:12-19 also describes his sin as well as his eventual destruction. One day his negative, sinful influence will be permanently ended. With electricity, the positive is where the current starts and the negative is where it ends. It's like life. Birth is the positive and death is the negative. One day, there will be no death for the believer in Christ. The current of the believer's life will flow eternally, energized by the personal presence of God Himself in the New Jerusalem! The new creation will shine will His glory FOREVER, and peace will reign forevermore!
  15. 1 point
    I believe much of Daniel is written in Aramaic, as it was the language of the Babylonian Empire at that time. The Old Testament was written in Hebrew, with the aforementioned Aramaic & the New Testament in Greek. Many of the first copies of the Bible were in Greek and Latin, translated from the original languages. I'm glad Bible translatorsare seeking to work from the original languages as much as possible.
  16. 1 point
    Aramaic you may know was the aristicratic language of ancient Jewish civilization. Early Christians would speak Greek and Latin. Modern Hebrew was reconstituted from ancient Hebrew. I seem to recall as you say parts of the Bible are in Aramaic and Greek. You could probably find teaching materials on these. I personally find Sumerian interesting as it's the earliest language. Not fully deciphered.
  17. 1 point
    Catman, that drawing was very well done, good job.
  18. 1 point
    It sounds like a demonic manifestation. Since there are no such thing as ghosts, seein that the dead remain in the grave until either the resurrection of life whe Christ returns in power and glory for those who have put their trust in Him as God the Son and their Savior, or the resurrection of condemnation after the Millennium for those who haven't. Ecclesiastes 9:4-6, 10, John 5:28, 29, Revelation 20:4-15. 2 Corinthians 11:13-15 shows that such events are consistent behavior for Satan and his monstrous minions. I will keep you in my prayers. Remember, Jesus is the only way to Heaven. He died for all mankind so we God may have a loving relationship with us, the pinnacle of His creation. May God bless you and keep you. The message of the end times is this, the Apostle John speaking, And I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell upon the earth, and to every nation, and kindred, and tongue, and people, Saying with a loud voice, fear God, and give glory to him, for the hour of his judgement is come, and worship him who made the heaven, and the earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters. Revelation 14: 6,7. Praise and thank God for your life, for it is a gift from Him. Reverence Him as Creator & accept His only begotten Son as Savior and Lord if you desire everlasting life. I hope you don't have anymore encounters with Satan's scummy sycophants. Trust in God and He will protect you.
  19. 1 point
    It's still fairly common to hear that autistic people "take everything literally" and "don't understand sarcasm". Through examining my own experience and observing others from various ends of the spectrum, I've come to view this as an oversimplification. I think that the instinct to read between the lines is just as present in most of us as it is in neurotypicals, and that our difficulty lies in doing it accurately. My sister is autistic and quite severely learning disabled (childhood speech delay, mental capacity of around 6/7 years old). She seeks constant emotional reassurance, yet increasingly takes offence when we give it to her, as it's taken to imply that she isn't happy (something she resents ever admitting), when this isn't how it's intended. Even an innocuous remark about something positive that happened in the past will be misinterpreted as implying that her life isn't as good in the present. This isn't the behaviour of someone who takes spoken communication at face value, but someone who instinctively tries and fails to do the opposite. I would even say that a significant number of high-functioning autistics I've met offline through various social groups actually have an above-average grasp of irony. Even with obvious social and communication difficulties, their approach to humour often tends to be quite dark, twisted and sarcastic. As for me, while I do have difficulty with non-verbal communication, and there are times when the true meaning of a sarcastic comment might elude me, I definitely don't lack an instinctive understanding that language can't reliably be taken at face value. I have come across a few who genuinely do seem to lack this instinct, but my experience suggests that its prevalence is overstated.
  20. 1 point
    I personally think that the old hag syndrome/ sleep paralysis is unprocessed trauma of powerlessness, violation, abuse, helplessness, terror/threat, shame etc.. depending on the form, and usually from childhood. The 'freeze' response, in general. Your psyche recreates the automatic bodily feeling of powerlessness/helplessness/frozenness that occurred during whatever kind of trauma it was, in attempt to process/draw your attention to processing this kind of experience that was impossible for the younger self to comprehend. That energy/info stays with you in some way till processed, waiting in darkness/your shadow/the unconscious/the night. Some people suppress it via addictions, others by dissociation from yourself, others by making other beings or people feel powerless or helpless (repeating the cycle of trauma). But thats just my opinion. And if human beings can change the physical reality - light from being a wave to a particle, just based on what we expect to see (in quantum physics), or create real medically observable effects based on receiving placebo drugs, then im sure that unconscious/unprocessed childhood traumas, in our psyche would be likely to expect this experience to occur again in some way, as it happened when young and learning about the way the world works. I know that sounds odd perhaps, but im not a paranormal believer, and prefer a logical, science based explanation, at least for me - and ive experienced sleep paralysis in the past, and this makes most sense to me.
  21. 1 point
    Species are always going extinct, in much of the capitalist western world which Extinction Rebellion would like to reduce to the stone age many previously locally extinct species are being reintroduced. One of the best ways for the world to be more environmentally conscious is for the world to be richer. Poor people place the environment very low on their list of priorities. That's how we ended up wiping out so many species in the first place. Hungry unevolved people wipe things out very quickly. I've yet to see a single theory that explains why rising CO2 levels would cause nontrivial global warming. The Greenhouse Effect is the one theory I see, but it is fatally flawed. You see CO2 absorbs a particular band of wavelengths, the sun produces a different band of wavelengths, these hit the planet and rebound back out to space in the form of black body radiation. The theory is CO2 absorbs these and the energy is released as heat. The problem is there is so much atmosphere and CO2 is highly opaque for these wavelengths that it already absorbs to saturation, indeed at 50ppm (we've recently gone past 400ppm) it pretty much maxes out. The only extra absorption you get is at the very edges or shoulders of the band of wavelengths it absorbs - where absorption is much weaker and so having more CO2 actually matters because you're not hitting a saturation point. But this extra absorption is trivial - at the shoulders the dropoff is very sharp, it doesn't taper off gradually. Preempting other arguments - for the whole correlation thing, well that's pretty meaningless because we do know that when the water heats up, it is less soluble to gases such as CO2. So warmer oceans means it can't store as much CO2 - it gets released into the atmosphere. There are also nonsensical things suggested about a feedback loop to cause a catastrophic runaway warming effect. This makes no sense logically given life has been going for hundreds of millions of years with up to 20 times higher levels of CO2 and global temperatures around 10C higher. If things were on such a knife-edge there'd be no life on this planet. There's no feedback loop because higher global temperatures cause more cloud cover - which reflects heat from the sun, so the opposite is true. The planet will receive less radiation from the sun if it's hotter. What is causing global warming? Well other greenhouse gases contribute - such as methane, as they aren't more or less saturated like CO2. But there's a much stronger relationship between global temperatures and the sun - ie total solar irradiance (TSI) & solar activity (magnetic stuff). So TSI is just the wattage from the sun, so it goes up then the planet receives more energy from the sun. Solar activity is more complicated and less understood. The theory is that magnetism from the sun (sunspots cause increases of it, as well as just random fluctuations) protect the planet from cosmic rays. Cosmic rays mean ions in the atmosphere, which can help the growth of aerosols, both of which seed clouds. So more magnetic activity = less cosmic rays which mean less clouds. Less clouds means warming. I've come across no known science which explains why CO2 levels would cause nontrivial warming. I've come across plenty from Extinction Rebellion which suggests their true goal is take down capitalism, that the people behind it are the rich elite, looking to make money off carbon trading or other technology. The politicians are happy to go along with it, because they're always looking for any vaguely justifiable reason to raise taxes. The only threat I see from CO2 is how rapidly it's increasing, this is very much unknown, there doesn't seem to be any evidence that it has caused problems so far. CO2 is also of course critical for plant life. And the world has literally gotten greener with higher levels of CO2 - it promotes higher crop yields, more trees and so on. The greening effect is undeniable and positive. I don't believe CO2 is causing the warming, but even if it were the warming is a good thing - the planet could support much more life if it were warmer.
  22. 1 point
    God often communicates to people through dreams. Look at Daniel chapters 2, 4, 7 and 8. I've had dreams of beasts obstructing my path, amongst others. Pray and ask God to help you understand what they mean and if you have faith in Him, He will reveal it to you.
  23. 1 point
    @Catman2018 I think reoccurring dreams have meaning. Your soul/subconscious trying to make you aware of something or express something that needs to be said/felt or changed. If you pay attention to the emotion and feeling of the dream, especially as soon as you wake up, you might find you understand it - though not always. No-one can interpret other peoples dreams (despite what new age nonsense might say) because symbols and objects have different meaning and significance to different people - people relate to themselves and the world differently too, and its the personal feeling behind it that matter more
  24. 1 point
    No, I don't really… I think there's one dream that I might have had more than once but that's it. Like, literally I had that dream twice and it's not one that I frequently have... It's kind of hard to remember specifics as I have dreams but then I "forget" them. Usually the dreams I have are eerie and disturbing. Like a ball of awkardness and creepiness and just overall bad feelings. They aren't like spectacular movie scenes or anything. It's just scary things that happen... And like I said, just bad feelings. I can usually "get" them where I feel like I can understand why I'm having them.
  25. 1 point
    I have a recurring dream of crashing a car - loosing control of it. Usually happens after a meltdown - I figure the car is my body. Also, getting off the bus at the wrong stop and being lost, at night and walking alone. This happened again last night, it pretty much sums up my life right now
  26. 1 point
    Does anyone have a big day or important event coming up? If so, sound off here & let the rest of Asperclick know about it because important events help shape who we are.
  27. 1 point
    (Not written by me) Where 75% of workers are on the autistic spectrum By Robbie Wojciechowski 21st October 2019 Our brains don’t all work the same way. One New York-based software company sees that as a competitive advantage. Rajesh Anandan founded his company Ultranauts (formerly Ultra Testing) with his MIT roommate Art Shectman with one aim: one aim: to prove that neurodiversity and autism could be a competitive advantage in business. “There is an incredible talent pool of adults on the autistic spectrum that has been overlooked for all the wrong reasons,” says 46-year-old Anandan. “People who haven’t had a fair shot to succeed at work, because of workplace and workflow and business practices that aren’t particularly effective for anyone but are especially damaging for anyone who is wired differently.” The New York-based quality engineering start-up is now one of an increasing number of firms looking towards autistic talent. But while programmes at companies including Microsoft and accounting firm EY are small and focused around supporting neurodiverse workers in the office, Ultranauts has redesigned its entire business around neurodiversity, changing hiring efforts to actively recruit individuals on the autism spectrum and developing new workplace practices to effectively manage neurodiverse teams. “We set out to change the blueprint for work, and change how a company could hire, manage and develop talent,” says Anandan. Neurodiversity has risen to the top of the agenda around inclusion at work in recent years, yet it is not a common term. It refers to the range of differences in individual human brain function which can be associated with conditions such as dyslexia, autism and ADHD. Research by the UK’s National Autistic Society (NAS) shows that the figures around employment of people with autism in the UK are still very low. In its survey of 2,000 autistic adults, just 16% were in full-time work, despite 77% of people who were unemployed saying they wanted to work. The barriers to work for people with autism can still be huge, and Richmal Maybank, employer engagement manager at NAS, says many factors contribute to this. “Job descriptions can often have core tick-box behaviours, and can be quite general,” she says. “Forms look for ‘team players’ and ‘staff with great communication skills’ but lack specific information.” Terms like these – or interview questions such as ‘where you see yourself in five years’ – can be too general for people with autism, as many with the condition can find vague questions particularly hard to decipher. Additionally, people can feel uncomfortable disclosing their disability or feel challenged by open-plan workplaces, where they may feel they need to socialise or absorb uncomfortable levels of noise. Five years in, 75% of Ultranauts’ staff are on the autistic spectrum – and one reason for this is its innovative approach to hiring. In other companies, assessing candidates often focuses heavily on communication competencies, which means neurodiverse voices can be excluded. But at Ultranauts there is no interview process and applicants don’t need relevant experience of specific technical skills. “We have adopted an approach to screening job applicants that is much more objective than you’ll find in most places,” says Anandan. Instead of using CVs and interviews, potential employees undergo a basic competency assessment in which they are evaluated against 25 desirable attributes for software testers, such as the ability to learn new systems or take on feedback. Following these initial tests, potential staff undergo a week of working from home fully paid. Potential recruits also know they can choose to work on a DTE (a desired-time equivalent) timetable, meaning they can take on as many hours as they feel comfortable managing, rather than being tied into full-time work. “As a result, we have a talent screening process to take someone who has never done this job and at the end of that process have a 95% degree of confidence… whether people would be great at this,” says Anandan. The competitive advantages of ‘neurodiversity’ Studies by Harvard University and BIMA have shown that embracing and maximising the talents of people who think differently can have huge benefits for a business. Having a neurodiverse workforce has been shown to improve innovation and problem solving, as people see and understand information in a range of different ways. Researchers have also found that accommodations made for neurodiverse staff members such as flexible hours or remote working can benefit neurotypical staff, too. The NAS say they have seen a rise in organisations reaching out to them to find out how they could better recruit autistic talent and neurodiverse workers, especially outside the IT sector. NAS offers suggestions for small changes, such as ensuring every meeting has an agenda. Agendas and similar tools can help neurodiverse staff focus on the relevant information needed and help people plan things in advance, making the meeting more accessible. “The things we suggest are good practice for any company, not just people with autism. They aren’t expensive, and are often easy quick wins,” says Maybank. “Employers need to recognise cultures in their organisation and to understand the unwritten rules of their organisation, to help people navigate that.” Maybank, who has been working with autistic people for the last decade, says she’d like to see more mandatory training for managers around neurodiversity and more buddying programmes to help people create better social links at work. She also feels employers should look at different progression routes for employees who may not want to become managers. But she says increased awareness of neurodiversity has improved understanding in workplaces. “People are becoming way more open about recognising different strands of autistic and neurodiverse behaviour,” she says. “People have a pre-conceived perception of what autism is, but it’s best to ask that person. People may be opposites of each other despite having the same condition.” Tailoring new technology Yet it’s not just increased awareness; remote working and new technologies are also helping to support workers who may previously have struggled to enter the workforce. Workplace tools including instant messaging platform Slack and list-making application Trello have improved communication for staff who may work outside a standard office environment. These tools can have additional benefits for people on the autistic spectrum, who might find things like face-to-face communication difficult. Ultranauts has made use of these technologies, as well as creating its own tools to suit staff needs. “A couples of years ago, a colleague on our team said they wished people came with a user manual,” says Anandan. So that’s exactly what they created, a self-authored guide called a ‘biodex’ which gives colleagues at Ultranauts all the information they need to find the best ways of working with a particular person. Being flexible about workplace set-up and tailoring company behaviours to cater for autistic needs has been a huge success for Ultranauts, which is beginning to share its experiences on best practice with other companies. Anandan says he’s learnt that making a workplace inclusive for neurodiverse colleagues hasn’t added friction or inefficiency, but allowed people who have largely been ignored by society to show their true talents. “We’ve shown over and over… that we’ve delivered results better because of the diversity of our team,” he says. Source: BBC Worklife 101
  28. 1 point
    I'll get this party started. I'm going be baptized this coming Sabbath at Elizabethtown Seventh-day Adventist Church. I've been looking forward to this for several wee. It will be such a wonderful, life-changing occasion!
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    @Peridot like @Sanctuary said, if thats the case, comments should be discussing viewpoints, not mocking appearance (its an ad hominem attack in critical thinking) Further, species are going extinct every day due to these effects; Miami is getting further submerged etc.. I dont have too much tolerance for people who refuse to face reality, or refuse to educate themselves - to even the simplest level of what is literally currently occurring and affecting so many, and will affect so many more (and it is really naive to assume everything humans have done to the earth will not cause any adverse effects). Its not a religion - that is the most absurd thing ive ever heard. There are bound to be some inaccuracies when trying to include all factors of predictions involving the entire earth, 7 billion people, and all the other inhabitants and forces that effect climate change - it doesnt mean it isnt happening. Its not such a terrible thing to ask those in power to support/financially endorse renewable energy, plant trees, etc.. to switch funding from supporting the destruction of the earth to things that will help it. I dont even think her viewpoints warrant the level of backlash. This is extremely short, and not fear-mongering at all:
  31. 1 point
    For individuals with ASD being judged in terms of their supposed deficiencies in non-verbal communication rather than what they actually say or do is frustratingly common. This is illustrated by the case of Greta but clearly the message she is delivering is also one that many people do not want to hear so her supposed limitations in facial expression, etc, become an extra way for her to be criticised. These are "inconvenient truths". The debate should be about what she actually says, not how she says it.
  32. 1 point
    https://www.instagram.com/p/BxcE-7WhPs6/
  33. 1 point
    I'm living out my agricultural fantasies playing Farming Simulator 2019.
  34. 1 point
    I will be taking delivery of a new Thompson Chain Reference Study Bible and a Strong's Concise Bible Concordance. I hope I get it today.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    I love Farming Simulator, Forza Motorsport & Elite: Dangerous. You won't catch me anywhere near games like GTA, Call of Duty & the like.
  37. 1 point
    As a Christian, there are certain games I will play & many I will stay VERY FAR away from.
  38. 1 point
    Like TylerMc, I'll never quit playing golf. I enjoy certain video games as well as reading.
  39. 1 point
    I wish I had the option of not driving. At least I can stay on the ground. I don't plan on skydiving at any time in the future. I used to miss climbing somewhat, but I could never get a partner and that limited me to bouldering. Plus I don't go out to the crags I used to know any more. They are a pretty long drive away.
  40. 1 point
    Excellent post. I agree entirely. Greta should be no more expected to fake her body language than a wheelchair-bound person would be to crawl up a flight of stairs. Besides, when it comes to the subject of large corporations wilfully destroying the natural environment for a profit, bribing elected officials to let them get away with it, and bankrolling misinformation campaigns intended to keep the public scientifically ignorant, what is there to smile about? Why shouldn't she be angry?
  41. 1 point
    That's life, I guess? No one's 100% happy in every way?
  42. 1 point
    @RiRi I dont know personally, but I honestly dont think it would be as great as you think it would be I wrote this answer in Quora in response to the Question "How do I accept that i'm not pretty?" if you're interested: Unconditional human value. Everyone has it regardless of their constellation of qualities. Also, attractiveness is like a commodity or a currency, which, in regards to physical attractiveness by a purely idealised standard, people received for free. Those who are highly attractive are sought out for this alone, which has nothing to do with them as a person. People want to get next to that attractiveness, get something from it, be associated with it. They also want to praise it, praise you for something you didnt do - what a sure way to distort a healthy sense of self? Would you be seen for who you are? Would you be able to accept your faults if they are always glossed over, and people assume you are perfect? If you are highly attractive, you run the risk of that superficiality seeping into you. Thinking you are more special, more deserving, more capable (because things seem to come easier to you, and people assume the best of you - this is a cognitive bias even babies commit). You probably run a greater risk of developing narcissistic traits or even the full blown personality disorder if the other precursors are there. Maybe some of this is exaggerated, and there are some people who are both very attractive and genuinely humble and balanced (not just an act of humility as part of their persona as is far more common). Either way, having a body, and interacting with the world through this interface which doesnt accurately represent who we are on the inside (the good, the bad, the distorted, the hidden), will always pose challenges, whichever way you are blessed - or not. If I had to pick, I would rather be ugly, but beautiful on the inside - genuinely a beautiful soul, and my face would be a filter to all the superficial people of the world, so I only meet or keep in my life the very best of people who can look beyond the limitations of my body Also, I think as a female we get a hint at both sides perhaps? I'm naturally smack in the middle, appearance wise, but when I put on makeup to leave the house, people treat me a bit differently: smile more, hold doors, give certain looks at you, are less awful/rude - and assume better of you somehow etc.. but if I dont wear makeup - but still otherwise am dressed fine/the same, it doesnt occur - the reverse does. Neither are particularly ideal. I would rather be invisible actually, if that were an option. But I think for beautiful people, it must be this in the extreme and its really disingenuous, it must be awful
  43. 1 point
    Yep, I still look the same...
  44. 1 point
    Photography and writing
  45. 1 point
    @RiRi Yes, I have twice. Once in Taupo, once in Whangarei in NZ. It was a very intensely experience. It was beautiful - the panoramic view, the amount of the earth you can see - and see the curve of the earth as you are falling towards it. Its surreal. There is a lot of wind. Its the most alive ive ever felt, like I was really alive in every cell. The closest ive had to flying - especially after the initial fall where you are coasting (with the parachute) on the wind like a gull. I was not afraid - I decided that if I decided I wanted to do it, I didnt want to be in fear the whole time because that would ruin it, I accepted that I could in theory realistically die and that would really be okay, I had nothing to loose, I told my mind that any feelings I had were excitement and refused any anxiety, so I was really able to be present with the experience. Ive always been afraid of heights - it was party overcoming that and just curiosity about my own human experience? That probably sounds weird but I only have one life to figure it out - and what better way than the extremes of the human experience - that was my logic anyway. The first one was less good because my ear covers were a little loose and wind got it which hurt my ears, which I could mostly block out but made me want to do the second time. It was exhilarating and brilliant. I am still so grateful for the experiences. I think I would do it again if I had the opportunity, I'm probably less open to life now that im older and im more sensitive these days. Are you thinking of doing it?
  46. 1 point
    I have a game, it's called moderating a forum that hates you. Don't think it will catch on........... lol
  47. 0 points
    The greatest discovery of all time is the justification by faith in Christ. This amazing teaching has changed the world. Without that, we would have likely done ourselves in.
  48. 0 points
    All that still doesn't answer this Kentucky boy's question about Asperclickers though.........


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