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    Alice

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/18/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    @Myrtonos We all have rigidity, idiosyncrasies, and 'special interests' in very different areas. There is that saying 'if you have met one person on the spectrum, you have only met one'. I often find myself amazed at ways so many aspies seem way more functional than me. I have way stronger sensory sensitivity. My rigidity is also around people and interpersonal boundaries - as a result I have zero people in my life, as I do not want to change or give up my rigidity/rules which to me feel like my own integrity and values - its hard to explain but most things people do feel like they cross a boundary (of being a decent human being) and I dont want to be around them. Others can hold down jobs. Yesterday I took a short walk to the library, with sunglasses, a big scarf - I still had to spend hours calming down, stimming and with no sensory input with so much stress and overwhelm in my body. But to say others who have it easier from a sensory perspective are neurotypical would be unfair and just as much discrimination as the neurotypicals give to us when we suppossedly seem normal or do manage to function. Just because you dont see something, doesnt mean it isnt there.
  2. 2 points
    Fair enough. Im sure you do to others as well. Also, we've all had to try to fit in with 'normal' society, to adapt, pretend, to 'mask' and copy neurotypical behaviours, attitudes and expectations. Learnt to hide the things that make us different. Some people have learnt how to mask better than others - some people were forced to via bullying or punitive parental situations. I think if you were diagnosed and accepted as autistic from a younger age, you may not have needed to adapt as much or try to act like NTs. Same as if you are higher functioning - you can blend in easier.
  3. 2 points
    As Alice has suggested, autism affects people in many different ways. Even if we take views on issues most will take fairly conventional views on the great majority of topics but be "outliers" on very different ones. Some will have fairly conventional views on just about every subject but autism may greatly affect their social relationships, communication style, behaviour or sensory experiences. There are also of course degrees to which autism affects people's lives - some are fairly mildly affected while others are profoundly affected. Many "function" much more successfully online than they do in in social settings and generally come across differently through written than oral communication. It may be that there are some people on this forum who are in reality "neurotypical" but I suspect the number is few because the vast majority have either been formally and officially diagnosed or have come to see themselves as autistic after a great deal of self-examination. In short just because members here may not share similar views or ways of thinking does not mean that they are closer to being neurotypical.
  4. 2 points
    this weekend it's my birthday I can't wait where going too play some giant jenga and my sister are going too make me a cookie and cream birthday cake
  5. 1 point
    I’ve tried to convince my parents to homeschool me but we tried that when I was younger and it didn’t go well. thanks for your reply
  6. 1 point
    (Not written by me) Festivals are all about the collective. Who's carrying the beers? Who's going to hammer in the tent pegs while you hold the frame down in the wind (and let's face it, rain)? And who's got the spare bog roll when you run out with two days to go? Heading to a packed field this summer can be a daunting prospect when you're on your own. It can be nerve-wracking to strike up a conversation, especially when loneliness is rife among young people - a BBC study last year found that 40 per cent of 16 to 24-year-olds experience it often. Enter Camp Loner. Download Festival has led the way in making a noise about social isolation and loneliness at festivals, with the concept later spreading to the Bloodstock and Reading events. The annual rock and metal festival at Donington Park near Derby has played host to Camp Loner since 2008, offering a spot for the solo camper to meet new like-minded pals. "Because it is alternative stuff, is rock and metal, and many people in our group didn't have a ton of friends in school and were marginalised," Ben Willmott, who helps to run Camp Loner, tells The Big Issue. "Obviously I am stereotyping here and that is not all of us but we do get a lot of people joining our group who are anxious and nervous and might only have a few friends online and that's it. "It's genuinely one of the most heartwarming bits on a Wednesday afternoon when people arrive at the festival, seeing people chat when they hadn't even met just two hours before and they are relaxed and talking rubbish and really enjoying themselves. Friendships are blossoming and it's just great." Camp Loner was started almost by accident when one reveller from Jersey was let down by his friends a couple of months before the festival. He posted a plea for other people in the same position to join up with him at the campsite. That first year brought together a small core of 35 to 40 people but now as many as 1,000 people camp together in a special cordon of the campsite after organisers made the special community an integral part of the Download experience. And it is not just about five days in June either with Willmott, alongside fellow Camp Loner organisers Louise Bedwell and Chris Morris, organising meet-ups and keeping the "community vibe" going throughout the year. He says: "Going on your own can be very daunting - there is 90,000 of them and one of you, there's five whole days and you're in the middle of nowhere, what do you do? What do you say? Actually it is one of the easiest things in the world. "Yes, you do have to sort of reach out to engage in conversation but that little investment pays back a thousand-fold in a matter of hours." "Big" Jeff Johns is all about conversation. The 36-year-old has become a legend in the Bristol music scene for his insatiable passion for gigs, sometimes taking in more than one per night. With his fuzzy blond hair and his 193 cm frame, Big Jeff is unmissable down the front enthusiastically getting into the rhythm, whatever the genre. "My experiences at gigs have helped to save and change me. For me, it was the excitement of seeing the musicians that drew me to gigs and being able to connect to something," says Johns, who was diagnosed with Asperger's a few years ago. "I find a lot of social situations very intimidating but as soon as I go somewhere and see a stage and PA set up I know that there is something that can take that focus away." Inclusivity is a big deal in the music world, something The Big Issue identified by including Gig Buddies in our 2019 Changemakers list for their work in allowing volunteers to team up with people who have learning disabilities to accompany them to concerts. And the ability to meet other gig-goers has been life-changing. "Without music I think I would be a recluse. I'd really struggle making friends and forming bonds with people because I find social situations difficult," Johns says. "I gradually found myself being inter-connected with lots of different micro-scenes within Bristol. It helped me get over my social anxieties because then I know that in between bands I can talk to people and I'd often find that we would have a shared love or a shared hate." When you're waiting for the first set to start this summer, think about how reaching out to other gig-goers could help change the tune. Source: The Big Issue (paper edition)
  7. 1 point
    For example: Some cases where I think differently from the majority are cases where even most others here are like most neurotypicals in that respect. For example, I have had issues with Web 2.0, particularly YouTube that hardly anyone else posting here has had, they may be on the same spectrum, but that still makes them seem neurotypical. I want to resist changes in the way recorded music is distributed, but hardly anyone else here seems any more resistant to that than most neurotypicals are.
  8. 1 point
    (Not written by me) Prisoners in England to be taught code The government is to fund a scheme that will see "carefully vetted" prisoners taught to code in order to better prepare them for the world of work. The project is part of a £1.2m effort to increase the digital skills of people from disadvantaged groups. The courses will be led by volunteers and industry experts and prisoners will work on real-world projects with external clients. They will start with basic coding before moving to a more advanced level. An award of £100,000 will be given to fund the project in two prisons initially - Humber [nr Everthorpe, Brough, East Yorkshire] and Holme House, [Stockton on Tees] in County Durham - as well as an employment hub in Sheffield. The hope is that the trials will eventually lead to a network of coding workshops in UK prisons. The programme is modelled on the Last Mile project in the San Quentin prison, in California, which has helped almost 500 offenders find jobs after release, with none of those taking part reoffending. That compares with a national reoffending rate in the US of 55%. Reoffending in the UK is estimated to cost around £15bn, according to the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. Minster for Digital Margot James said: "The government is committed to stopping the cycle of reoffending and a valuable asset to prevent recidivism is employment. "Equipping offenders with coding skills will help them into life-changing work and give them a path to a hugely rewarding career." Neil Barnby, who has been teaching coding to prisoners at HMP Humber, as part of an organisation called Code4000, said: "The workshops are reducing reoffending at a measurable rate, because we keep in touch with our graduates. "We are constantly seeing success after success. "When I started teaching in prisons, I thought that if I could change just one life, turn one person away from crime, then I have achieved something truly marvellous. "I look back on the years that I have been teaching coding in prisons and can see all the lives I have had a part in changing for the better. "Not just the ex-offenders but their families and, more importantly, their children. "It is an enormous sense of achievement - and with this funding, I look forward to changing even more lives." Prisoners will learn HTML, CSS and Javascript, before moving on to more advanced concepts such as Git, TDD, MVC, databases and full stack development. They will then work on real-world projects for external clients, with money earned being ploughed back into the project. Stage three of the process will see them working for clients on temporary day release, with the aim of helping them find full-time employment as developers when their jail terms are complete. Source: BBC News
  9. 1 point
    have a awesome weekend everybody and have a happy canada day too all my fellow Canadians on the forum
  10. 1 point
    Definitely better, I used to feel extremely alone before the internet even though I had a couple of friends. Also extremely convenient for ordering parts for things like my antique tractor etc. It's great to find a site like this with others who have experienced the things I have. Definitely better, I used to feel extremely alone before the internet even though I had a couple of friends. Also extremely convenient for ordering parts for things like my antique tractor etc. It's great to find a site like this with others who have experienced the things I have. Definitely better, I used to feel extremely alone before the internet even though I had a couple of friends. Also extremely convenient for ordering parts for things like my antique tractor etc. It's great to find a site like this with others who have experienced the things I have.
  11. 1 point
    I love coffee Ice cream, I don't really have a favorite yogurt flavor, and I never have had the brain freeze many people talk about.
  12. 1 point
    Humans are odd. Procrastination for example - I mean, why would someone intentionally sabotage their own lives for absolutely no reason? We also sweat the small stuff, and become angry over the pen lid in the draw without a pen, yet turn a blind eye to the fact that our lives are whistling away at a rate of knots, and we're still happy to bumble along making next to no progress. A lot of these sorts of things are covered in the bible, which is why it's always worth a read, if only for books like Job - which everyone can relate to. You don't have to necessarily believe in it to enjoy it. I'll read the Quran sometimes just to gain a better understanding of Islam (as I said, I'm after world peace predominately.)
  13. 1 point
    While God created Lucifer as a covering cherub, Lucifer himself is the source of evil as he became proud and arrogant due to his position. He hates mankind and introduced sin into the world in a futile attempt to permanently disrupt our relationship with God. The Father remedied the situation through the plan of redemption by His advent as Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God. I am intimately familiar with evil as well, but through Christ, evil is overcome by good.
  14. 1 point
    (Not written by me) High school boy with autism lands Miss Utah hopeful as his homecoming date after classmates play a cruel prank Michael, a junior at Taylorsville High, took Miss Greater Salt Lake to homecoming The teenager, who has autism, received a heartbreaking fake invite to the dance One of his teachers got in touch with the local beauty queen and asked for help Dexonna Talbot, a Miss Utah hopeful, said she cried when she heard of the prank Talbot walked into Michael's class and asked him to go with her instead A beauty queen has helped a bullied high school student get the last laugh on his peers. Michael Conrad, a junior at Taylorsville High School who has autism and ADHD, received a fake invitation to homecoming that left him upset and his mother 'sick to her stomach'. The culprits, who are yet to be identified, egged his home and left a note saying: 'I'm sorry for the mess. But how about I make it up to you by taking you to Homecoming?' Fox News reported. The note was attributed to a friend of Michael's, but when he confronted her about it, she denied all knowledge and told him she already had a date. Michael's uncle said on Twitter the teenager had: 'tried to hide the hurt when this happened but it was obvious that he was upset inside'. Hearing about the cruel prank, debating teacher Jenn Palomino said she was heartbroken, and determined to help right the wrong. She contacted Miss Greater Salt Lake, Dexonna Talbot, and asked if she might be able to help salvage her student's homecoming experience. Talbot, who will compete for Miss Utah in the next few months, said she felt called to act the second she heard about the fake invitation. 'The second I heard about this, I knew I wanted to do something,' she said. 'I automatically broke down into tears, because just thinking about the fact that someone would go out of their way to make someone else feel bad is so heartbreaking to me.' Holding a sign covered in Starburst - Michael's favourite candy, Talbot was filmed entering his high school classroom last week to ask him to homecoming - for real this time. Standing up, he can be heard responding with an enthusiastic: 'Sure!' As the pair chat, Michael's classmates can be heard applauding the unlikely match. On Saturday, Talbot shared photographs of the pair ahead of the big dance. 'Had the time of my life with the coolest, funniest, kindest and most amazing guy at homecoming tonight,' she wrote. 'Michael you are one of a kind. I am so humbled by this experience. Bullying sucks and kindness ALWAYS wins.' Speaking to friends on Facebook, Michael's mother Jennifer said she still doesn't know who played the cruel prank on her son, but the family have chosen to focus on the positives. 'We don't know who did it, but to us it doesn't matter,' she said. 'Through this experience our sweet boy was able to have the time of his life.' 'I just hope [the bullies] realize that you should [not] tear someone down to try and make yourself look cool.' Source: Daily Mail
  15. 1 point
    As a Christian on planet earth, my only interest is to unify the human race. Debating about who is right and who is wrong isn't going to bring us any closer to world peace. Spiritually, my faith goes a lot deeper - I don't do denominations, I find all of that sort of thing pedantic and complicates an already difficult journey. The bible is full of grey area that requires constant study to comprehend - even some reverends and pastors I know still struggle with it in places. It's not uncommon.
  16. 1 point
    Your post is kind of too complex to answer. I always felt a lot of people on forums (Wrong Planet included) may well not have HFA or Asperger Syndrome but this is just a generalised assumption on my part. Real diagnosis requires hugely detailed information (from childhood) and thorough knowledge of autism conditions. I have felt it was overly diagnosed in the US initially in the interests of drug corporations. Also I feel autism spectrum has been confused with I.T. related psychological issues since I.T. related behavioural changes appear quite similar to autism. There are huge differences however. I view High Autistic kids as about 3 per school on average - at least as a child I recall only a couple of other kids as similar. Today psychiatrists will maintain HFA is a "common disorder". Yet I have to question influence from drug companies (pushing drugs on hyperactive, distracted kids) as well as damage caused by I.T. games and the digital issue of non-socialisation.
  17. 1 point
    (Not written by me) Woofstock UK: The Devon Dog Festival With A Heart There’s no denying that the award-winning Woofstock UK is one of the most dog and family friendly festivals around. Voted ‘Best Day Out’ two years running by Dog Friendly Awards, it’s clear to see the passion and energy founder organisers and dynamic duo Heather and Carol Nesbitt-Bayley put into creating a fun-filled time for all. But what was the driving force behind this barking-mad couple creating the first Woofstock UK five years ago? What craziness made them wake one day and just say, “I know, let’s do a festival for dogs”? It all started with one life changing day back in 2012 when Heather suddenly fell seriously ill. She said: “I dragged myself out of bed one morning, feeling heavy and lethargic. Harry and Maggie, two of our dogs, didn’t bounce in for their usual morning greeting, instead they both stood stock-still and stared at me. My face and neck were covered in unexplained dark purple bruises, and although I tried to take the dogs for a walk, they wouldn’t allow me to leave the house and kept blocking me at every turn. “I was rushed to A&E where a doctor took blood tests, a brain scan and chest X-ray. The diagnosis was my immune system was killing itself and it was seeing my blood and platelets as foreign – basically I was dying. “It was a close-call as to whether I was going to make it through the night. “During my long stay at the hospital, the ‘Pets as Therapy dog’ came to visit which really lifted my spirits. When I was finally released from hospital I thought how amazing dogs actually are, and how our two dogs were fantastic by working out there was something seriously wrong! I spoke to Carol and said I’ve got a crazy idea – I want us to celebrate dogs and all animals, and to leave some kind of legacy – and the rest is history. “I’m still unwell and under the hospital’s neurology care. Carol and I want to carry on raising awareness and much needed money for both local and international animal charities for as long as we are able. That is how Woofstock UK was started as an annual one-day event in the middle of a field for horses which has grown year on year. We are so excited and delighted that we are celebrating our fifth anniversary with a crazy weekend festival in August!” The multi award-winning festival attracts thousands of visitors worldwide and this year is relocating to a 13-acre site based near Dartmouth with headline sponsor Bella and Duke. Held from Friday 16th – Sunday 18th August, it promises to be bigger and better than ever before and pawsome fun for happy hounds, dog-lovers and all the family. Traditionally a one-day event, it has proved so popular that it’s celebrating its fifth year with a weekend extravaganza, including camping, glamping and live entertainment. The only one of its kind in the UK, Woofstock prides itself on being ‘a festival by dogs for dogs’, attracting visitors year on year with its unique dog-orientated aspects. On arrival at the gate canny canines will collect bespoke 100% natural dog biscuit tickets specially made in the Netherlands by independent Ammy’s Delights. The Dutch company has been a great supporter, providing tickets and dog-show award hampers since Woofstock UK first began. Visitors will also be given a list of rules addressed to their furry friends, ‘pawed’ by Woofstock’s mascot, Spaniel Harry, to ensure everyone can relax and enjoy the event and all that it has to offer. Day-time activities include police dog displays, fun dog-shows and for a small fee ‘hot-dogs’ can cool off and have a splashing time in the special pooch pool supplied by the Soggy Dog Company who will be travelling down from Bedfordshire. With lots of things to see and do, including a diverse mix of trade stands; a shopping village and plethora of local artisan gastro delights and drink suppliers; it promises to be a fun time for all the family, with plenty of entertainment, including live music on the main stage and food and fayre for dogs, kids and grown-ups too! Heather concludes: “It’s a chance for like-minded people to come and have a really good time and it is all so chilled like puppy love. You don’t have to have a dog to come to Woofstock, just rock up and have a really good time. I promise you won’t get to the end of the weekend without having made new friends, whether that’s of the furry four-legged kind or of the human kind.” For more information and to book your Woofstock UK tickets, click here. Source: Grow Exeter


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