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    Alice

    Asperclicker


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    StarlessEclipse

    Asperclicker


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  3. Jess8

    Jess8

    Finding My Feet


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  4. HalfFull

    HalfFull

    Asperclicker


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/14/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Before I even read Alice's reply I felt that your step daughter could very well have ADHD. It reads more like the Hyperactive type to me, though it would be diagnosed as ADHD anyway. I don't really see any Autistic traits as such other than the social awkwardness but that could also occur with some ADHD cases, as being hyperactive doesn't necessarily mean being uninhibited. It does seem worth discussing with her dad.
  2. 3 points
    Hello! So my 8 year old step daughter has had problems since I met her (over 3 years ago) Her dad will occasionally mention concerns but her mother just thinks she has a speech impediment. Here are her symptoms: * she can never sit still. While eating, chilling and watching a movie, doing homework, reading, playing on electronics. You name it and she is always awkwardly moving and shuffling around. She constantly falls off couches and chairs. She even falls standing up while doing nothing at all. She also constantly runs into things. Poles, signs, walls, fences. She's not even distracted, she just walks right into them. *She also started randomly smiling a few years ago (not sure if it's new or if her actual parents just haven't noticed) She will be sitting and doing nothing and will just have an odd twitchy smile every few seconds like she doesn't have control of her facial muscles. She also awkwardly smiles while getting into trouble (which is quite often) *She can't follow very simple tasks. We will tell her "don't talk to strangers" before going outside with our other 4 older kids. When asked to immediately repeat what she's not supposed to do she will either spout off some random thing like "I'm not supposed to play on my bike" or freeze with a look of shock and horror on her face and not respond at all. *She seems to have poor impulse control and is very messy, for her age, while doing any task. She is also constantly in trouble at school for not paying attention, not keeping her hands to herself or for not following instructions. *She seems extremely socially awkward. Either retreats to a hiding place or clings to us like velcro without saying a word to anyone while in public. *she seems to constantly repeat saying things. If we say "we are going to the park, get your socks and shoes on" she obsessively says and tells everyone about a park but it will take 30 minutes, multiple remindings and normally it will take someone to get harsh with her (never anything physical) to eventually do what she was told. *She freezes or throws tantrums for simple things. Every single morning it will take almost an hour to get her ready. Sure I can help but I'd also like to see her develop properly and do simple tasks that our 2 year old can follow. She seems to have constant meltdowns. She will take every single sock out of her drawer (which i pair together and put away to make it easier for her) and try on all of them and then tell me she has no socks. *She once had 1 flip flop slide almost off of her foot at the store once. She froze and had a crazy meltdown because she refused to move her foot the one inch that would have placed her foot back into the flip flop which seems very odd to me. *I know every childs development is different but I feel like an 8 year old should be capable if simple instructions and tasks. I'm very worried about her but, as her stepmother, I have no authority to take her to the dr. I feel that if we could get her help we might be able get thr right tools to help her adjust not only at home but also in school. I feel like she is different and therefore should be treated differently. We just need the knowledge and tools to do so. I would also like to add that she is a very sweet girl. Despite her issues she isn't a monster child that is throwing tantrums and just being a jerk (trust me, I have a 10 year old nephew that is very ill behaved and does things on purpose to get in trouble) I just want others opinions on what could possibly be wrong with her. I've read up on autism conditions and think that might be what's going on?? Just need some advice! Thanks in advance for any help!
  3. 3 points
    This reminds me so much of myself as a kid. I dont want to assume too much, I dont know the child, but based on what youve said this is how I relate to it as an adult diagnosed with both Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADD (inn-attentive subtype) and she does sound similar - I was uncoordinated, bumpy into things, eye-to-hand coordination tasks like sports were a nightmare, I would blank out whenever a ball was coming anywhere near me. Common in both ADD/ADHD and autism - random smiling for me was either being off in my own world, a funny part of a film or sentence reoccurring in my mind (like mental echolalia), finding something funny that only I would understand or find funny or that I didnt know how to communicate or perceiving something non-typically that seemed funny to me. Normal in Autism and ADD. -The instruction part is possibly a sensory issue. When someone is speaking the sounds take up all the space in my mind - I cant also process and comprehend them at the same time. Im just looking at someone talking and hearing sounds until Ive had a moment to process, she may not be recognising its an instruction even if she understands the words. When prompted with a demand, she may be panicking and just picking the first instruction that comes to mind. Stress lowers sensory processing capacity. She will perceive the anger before comprehending words, meaning, instructions - so you turning from explaining mode to anger/demand will be shocking. - constantly repeating things, sentences words or phrases could be echolalia. If there is a positive association with the word/sentence, or it just sounds nice, autistic people often repeat it because it gives a nice feeling or is a form of auditory stimming. Even now as an adult I repeat lines of disney films to myself, outloud or in my head, or parts of a disney jingle etc.. It has a positive association - Meltdown are never about what it appears to be about on the surface - there is an intense internal experience going on that is awful to experience, I can understand it may seem odd but for her it feels a bit more life or death. Its definitely not crazy. - The fidgeting is a classic ADHD symptom (the hyperactive subtype) which I didnt have, impulse control is an issue for either subtype of ADD/ADHD. Unless its stimming, a repetitive movement used to soothe, reassure, ground etc.. - I recall several times where my mum was telling me off where I began smiling inappropriately or even laughing. The reasons were varied, but I didnt really understand what she was doing or saying - the angry telling off seemed like an odd comical act, another time I just didnt register her words or even the sounds and was just smiling at the person I loved, another time I was having a weird perception of feeling like I was zooming in and out of my body - her head would get smaller and further away, then come back closer, I couldnt understand what was happening and it looked funny. Sometimes she ended up laughing with me and it broke through her anger, other times not - and that wasnt my intention but she was pretty good about it saying she didnt want to have to tell me off anyway and cant do it to my smiling face. These days we know children dont need punishment, just reasoning, but it was a while back. Its very hard to have your perception, sensory experience, comprehension so opposite to everyone else, it makes the world a very confusing place - and makes people very confusing especially when you are a child and are learning to make sense of the world. You cant force someone with a developmental disorder to develop at the same rate as 'normal' kids - it will only cause harm and potentially trauma. You seem to have valid reasons for your concerns and wanting to get her appropriate help and support is really good. Can you speak kindly and openly about this to her mother, perhaps provide some brochures or print off some info from the net. Even if its not this, its good to find out either way. If she is developmentally behind, support would be good in whichever form she ends up needing. In the meantime, try slowing down your speech, give her time to process and respond. Ask her what she is experiencing - 'whats happening for you right now?' 'what does that feel like for you?' 'what do you need to feel better?' etc.. You could put up a little picture based list, like a flow chart of images of what you would like her to complete in order each morning to get ready - like a picture of brushing hair, cleaning teeth, her uniform etc.. pictures are easier - a lot of autistic people think in pictures so its more natural, you could try this out and see if it helps. Try and extend some extra compassion beyond what seems normal and even though her behaviour seems out of proportion, if she is on the spectrum, her experience is so far out of proportion, and getting through each day like that is very solitary, brave and an achievement.
  4. 1 point
    A quote from an old Soviet psychology document: "Принято считать, что эти дети являются представителями «крайнего варианта мужского характера» (A. van Krevelen, 1962 и др.). В то же время некоторые их особенности, выявляющиеся при наблюдении (раннее речевое развитие и высокий уровень речи в последующем, тонкая ручная умелость при общемоторной неловкости и др.), описываются как характерные отличительные признаки психофизиологического развития девочек по сравнению с мальчиками." "It is considered that these children are representatives of the “extreme variant of a male character” (A. van Krevelen, 1962, etc.). At the same time, some of their features that come to light upon observation (early speech development and a high level of speech later, limited manual skill with common motor impairment, etc.) are described as distinctive features of the psycho-physiological development of girls compared to boys." An unusual but striking observation - well worth exploring. All my female friends are limited in the sphere of manual work, to a lesser or greater extent. I will often be asked to fix a stuck lock or any basic mechanical difficulty that arises. I should point out too that I'm not the prime candidate myself for fixing things. The above quote relates to me as well. Over time, I've improved my DIY skills and learned some basic woodwork or how to use power drills and tools but, compared to typical DIYers, I am not really so great at practical tasks. I also feel like I have 4 thumbs and 2 fingers so tend to get very worked-up and irritable when, say, fixing a bike. Or I may struggle to figure out some mechanical fitting. It's interesting the psychiatrists above suggests later on that "limited manual dexterity" only is highlighted as a problem in relation to boys because at school it's just assumed boys will be far better with at stuff like woodwork and metalwork than girls. In fact, at my school, when the boys did woodwork class, girls would be sent off to baking and cooking classes. It's another topic entirely to discuss whether these differences are predominantly cultural. Personally, I feel pretty sure I could teach any female to fix a broken bike or use power tools. I know the odd female who can weld and we all know some women have been known to make great mechanics (even if percentage-wise they are few). When I read testimonies by males with A.S., very often they refer to problems at school with manual skills: "I was excellent at all subjects except for music, gymnastics, drawing, and manual 6 training." (Paul Cooijman) My own take on this? It is true Asperger himself compared HFA to an extreme masculine identity (in thought processing) but I myself have noted girls with A.S. often tend to be tomboyish and I think many of the males are actually less masculine in personality. The point is anyway the Russian psychiatrist compares Asperger males to neurotypical females in the area that's limited to manual dexterity. Personally I just accepted I am not particularly brilliant with applied, practical work and tend to be more theoretical. I tend to streamline my activity accordingly and just do my best when trying to work with my hands.
  5. 1 point
    For some people the internet has opened up new possibilities for learning and playing music. Many members of the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq had learned to play their instruments via YouTube tutorials, as related in 'Upbeat' by Paul MacAlindin. And the composer Eric Whitacre has done experiments with virtual choirs.
  6. 1 point
    That's kind of you. I asked Willow to delete the thread because I didn't want to seem like an attention seeker.
  7. 1 point
    @StarlessEclipse I think I remember reading your most thread and wanted to say something but I've been busy. I now see it's been deleted. I want to let you know that there was nothing to apologize for. I hope you're doing okay.
  8. 1 point
    Yes, they can. That's why credit cards were invented. Got no more money? No problem. Have a credit card, get a loan. Then become a debt slave for the rest of your life. So the rich can continue to get richer and the poor poorer. If it were really true that the rich cared about the poor having weatlh and plenty of money to maintain a decent standard of living, then there wouldn't be so many problems in society, but unfortunately, the reality is that the accumulation of wealth just leads to the desire for more wealth and the goal of most of the top 1% of rich people is not that the poor should have more wealth or better lives, just more consumer goods with no real value, and for them, the wealthy, to accumulate more wealth for themselves.
  9. 1 point
    Tylermc

    Hi

    Hi a warm wellcome too the forum you will really enjoy it here its awesome
  10. 1 point
    @Max000 The general public did have access to email before 1989, but it was non-internet email. Also, there were online communities in the 1970s and 1980s but these were Bulletin Board Systems. They differed from web offerings in a lot of ways, and they were locally oriented.
  11. 1 point
    I don't see how this relates to my question.
  12. 1 point
    @Willow due to an unexpected positive change in life circumstances, I've decided to resubscribe.
  13. 1 point
    I say it about everybody (you're infinite, etc) but you truly DO have unlimited potential. The key for you is to secure internal peace before doing anything, and realise that the sheer brilliance I (all of us) see in you is actually true. So yeah, perfect the foundation before building the house. Because the house can be knocked down and rebuilt thousands of times with a strong foundation. Just be sure to ignore the ultimate bully (your current mindset.)
  14. 1 point
    @StarlessEclipse I hope you are all right. I have had thoughts before like yours as I've suffered from suicidal depression. I am grateful for the help I have received from @Miss Chief regarding depression and life advice. If you ever feel like ending your life, make sure you talk to someone, anyone who'd you think would care.
  15. 1 point
    @StarlessEclipse I hope you’re okay
  16. 1 point
    Welcome sounds like autistic burnout from all the effort it takes to try fit into an NT world, and appear neurotypical 24-7 witch can drain overtime and worsen coping/functioning - its a common aspie experience. You might have to cut back and pick up lots of self-care habits and routines that suit you and include more accomodations when you have to be exposed to excess sensory/social stuff- like noise cancelling headphones/earplugs, glasses, soothing tools and objects, music, choose more suitable environs etc.. whatever it is for you
  17. 1 point
    How does using profit to increase productivity prevent the rich from accumulating vastly more than they need while the working classes are driven to destitution? Outsourcing labour to countries with practically non-existent worker protection laws so that goods can be manufactured twice as quickly for a fraction of the price is a step up in productivity, as is automation. Neither helps those who require an income to survive.


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