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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/14/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    I'm sorry to hear this rainbow. A lot of us have this problem with noise at parties and as you explained why you were moving places there shouldn't have been a problem. Was it your friend who later rang you? If so I would expect them to have a more supportive approach as they know your situation.
  2. 1 point
    It's a tough subject and I feel that no one really knows what we should be eating. Scientists can't grab a bunch of humans and do whatever they want with them, and that makes the whole process very slow. Ethics, eh? You can find studies that support almost any claim in nutrition, and it's going to take scientists a long time to figure out what's good or bad. Let's say we have some studies that say sausages are bad for us, but it's not conclusive. So the scientists go "Great, let's tell 200 humans to eat sausages everyday and see if it's true... oh wait". You see the problem? xD And then there's studies that you might want to take with a grain of salt... "Cheese lowers your bad cholesterol by 30%, according to study, funded by the WeLoveCheese foundation" It's a mess, really. There's only a few dietary-recommendations that have solid evidence behind them, such as avoiding trans-fats. There's a book called "The Bad Food Bible" by Aaron Carroll (a researcher), and he covers some controversial subjects (butter, MSG, eggs, salt and diet-soda), and gives some solid rules for healthy-eating. He also goes into the problems of studies in nutrition. The general "eat a varied diet" recommendation is kinda like: "we don't really know what you should be eating, so eat different foods and hope for the best". It doesn't sit well with me, but I guess it's not a bad recommendation given the problems in nutrition. You can lose weight on any diet where you consume less calories than you burn, but as for what's "healthy", that's a much more difficult problem. I don't think carbs are a problem; some people do well without them, some people do well on them. It's something you need to experiment with and see how you respond, but that can have problems too (placebo). I would personally stick to whole or minimally processed foods, exercise, and roughly follow the recommended carb/protein/fat/fibre intakes. Cronometer is a useful tool for this, and even shows what micronutrients are covered by the foods you eat. It's a great way to create a balanced diet: https://cronometer.com/
  3. 1 point
    I think the key to a healthier diet is low carb and high protein/fibre. As I have ADHD cutting gluten out of my diet makes a HUGE difference to me, I have more energy I sleep better and my mood improves. I have the Curves book (that's an Amazon UK link but if you search locally you will find it with that info, check ebay I got my cousin a new copy of it for a couple of quid on there recently) and I find if I loosely follow the low carb diet in that book within 10 days I see a huge improvement in my physical and mental well being, once you are feeling better physically and mentally then you can start adding in exercise which again will give you a big boost mentally (once your past your medical stuff of course). Also it doesn't have to be a lot of exercise, start small and manageable, like 10 minutes and build it up slow. As others have said it is about your whole lifestyle rather than a quick fix diet

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