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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/15/2018 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    Jade's World Grace Dent follows Jade, a games designer with autism. She's heading to a world-famous games festival in New York. Can she navigate her condition and make the trip a success? Listen or download the podcast here (28 minutes)
  2. 1 point
    How often do you hear: "People with A.S. lack empathy." A great example how confusion and stereotyping spreads. What Asperger spelled out is autistic psychopaths either over empathise or under empathise. In the movie on Hans Christian Anderson his extreme empathy was shown in scenes where he cries at the opera and so on. So really we need to state that people with A.P. show extremes of empathy. By simply repeating the mantra that they "lack empathy" we just add to ever more misunderstanding. Another common misconception: People with A.P. simply collect large amounts of information on favourite topics such as "train spotting" but show no "deep understanding" of the subject. And yet Asperger distinguishes between 2 groups of autistic psychopaths. (1) Collectors of facts, figures and numbers. (2) Actual scientists or chemists or anatomists. The latter Asperger places in the minority. Yet for ages psychologists have adhered to the train spotting stereotype. At the moment I am attempting to clarify all Asperger discovered through quotes of his work. My hope is to build a solid framework to clearly outline what we do know before jumping ahead and aimlessly quoting stereotypes (or old wives tails). I confess much of it has had me confused just the same. Above all we need to define what autism actually is. I don't want to knock Baron Cohen but his famous test was too generalised and loose to be effective. If switchboards were jammed by people who passed the test with flying colours, that is a problem. For example, if you ask: Do you prefer to go out with friends or stay home and read?, any die-hard book worm will tip the scales closer to autism. So maybe better: Does being in the company of other people make you tense and wish to retreat by yourself? Not perfect but detail helps. Some then may respond, "I just prefer to read as I love a good book."
  3. 1 point
    None of what I'm going to say is helpful to the issues you're facing, but to at least give something like an answer to the core systemic problems: a.) The medical knowledge is lacking. I mean, all of the money that gets thrown into autism largely seems to be chasing after this well-intentioned idea that we're close to a "cure" for something that people can't even define. And that last bit is basically the problem. Hundreds of millions have gone into autism research, but not much has gone into understanding it broadly. I mean, look at how many people think autism is a condition that only affects children. And like, it's incredible how recently researchers have actually understood even the most basic things about how the symptoms appear in women, that sensory issues are typically a major part of ASD, etc, etc. Like, because there's like zero people with ASD actually studying ASD and contributing to the research, it means many medical professionals can keep on repeating mantras regarding from the 1950's without real resistance within the medical community. So yeah, because parents fund ASD research and they are obsessed with "fixing" their children and making them "normal", effectively zero money goes into understanding how ASD appears in adults. I'd be willing to bet that the medical community would be fucking stunned past recognition if they could sample the full range of adults with ASD, at what they can do, what they have accomplished, etc. b.) It's also partially our faults. I don't mean you and me as individuals; I mean the group of people who can pass well enough that we sort of get a choice to hide or to not. Because 99% of the time, it's easier to pass and just deal with all of the negatives that that entails. Every time an autistic person acquiesce, beats themselves up for being different, reacts to most situations making sure to seem normal --it implicitly complies with the notion that autistic people act a "certain" way, and if you don't then you aren't autistic. It's also due to the relative nascence of psychology and psychiatry; so little is known about human psychology, what affects it, how it works, etc. So when people chose to hide in plain sight, doctors don't know anything about them and their lives. c.) Politicians defunding medical care. It's extremely frustrating though. Realistically, I don't know how these issues get fixed without organizing and a serious effort at activism. That's particularly hard if you don't have an official diagnosis (then you can be freely ignored, and are potentially putting your livelihood/friendships on the line if you have a job), but still just as hard with the diagnosis because now you're publicly identifying yourself. It'd be great if there was some better, not child-associated things (like flags, symbols, public figures) for people with ASD to at least push some level of acceptance. At least to contrast with the child-centric picture of ASD.
  4. 1 point
    Thats the exact advice my friends give to me....... Im still 50/50 as to whether it will help. I reckon If Id had a diagnoses in the early days I may well have become a 'Victim' of my own sorrow.

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