Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'syndrome'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Hello!
    • Introduce Yourself
  • Asperger's Help & Advice
    • Symptoms & Diagnosis
    • Help & Resources
  • Living With Asperger Syndrome
    • Friendships & Relationships
    • Education & Work
    • Medication & Therapy
  • General Chatter
    • General Discussion
    • Motivational Meadow
    • Moot Point
  • Asperclicker's Lounge
    • Member Exclusives
    • Meeting In Real Life
  • Forum Announcements
    • Updates and Rules
    • Feedback
  • Photography Club's Discussion
  • Photography Club's Galleries
  • Furry Club's Topics
  • Computing Club's Topics
  • Prog rock's Reviews and Recommendations
  • Prog rock's General Discussion
  • Languages's Language learning resources
  • Languages's Language learning
  • Languages's Language teaching
  • Languages's Translation and linguistics
  • Languages's English language
  • Languages's Topics
  • Retro Gaming Club's Topics
  • Anime Club's Ghost in The Shell Movie
  • Animal club's Pets
  • Jazz, Jazz Funk / Rock and Fusion's Topics
  • Cartoon artwork's Topics
  • Australasians' club's Help, Support and Advice
  • Australasians' club's Education and working life
  • Australasians' club's Friends and Family
  • Australasians' club's Meeting others in person

Product Groups

  • Asperclick Merchandise
  • Autism Products

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 5 results

  1. The man whose name would be used to label our 'condition' may now have passed on - having died in October 1980 - but if you ever had the chance to meet him would you have taken that chance? Hans was an Austrian pediatrician - born in February 18, 1906 on a farm outside Vienna (Austria's capital city). He was a man who, ironically, may have had the very condition his name would be given to. At an early age he showed special talents in language, and already in the first school years he was known for his frequent quotations of the Austrian national poet, Franz Grillparzer. He had difficulty finding friends and was considered to be "remote". In the youth movement of the 1920's, however, he met with some comrades with whom he maintained contact all through his life. He was conferred doctor of medicine in 1931 and assumed directorship of the play-pedagogic station at the university children's clinic in Vienna in 1932. He married in 1935 and had five children. From 1934 he was affiliated with the psychiatric clinic in Leipzig. Asperger published the first definition of Asperger Syndrome in 1944. In four boys, he identified a pattern of behavior and abilities that he called “autistic psychopathy,” meaning autism (self) and psychopathy (personality). The pattern included “a lack of empathy, little ability to form friendships, one-sided conversation, intense absorption in a special interest, and clumsy movements.” Asperger called children with AS “little professors,” because of their ability to talk about their favourite subject in great detail. Asperger showed a positive outlook towards the children - treating them sympathetically and been convinced that, despite their difficulties, many would use their special talents in adulthood. He followed one child, Fritz V., into adulthood. V. became a professor of astronomy and solved an error in Newton’s work he originally noticed as a child. During a time when Austria was occupied by the Nazis - who were intolerant to the disabled and sent such individuals to the concentration camps to be killed - Asperger's positive outlook and passionate defense of the value of autistic individuals was best shown in a paper he wrote, stating "We are convinced, then, that autistic people have their place in the organism of the social community. They fulfill their role well, perhaps better than anyone else could, and we are talking of people who as children had the greatest difficulties and caused untold worries to their care-givers.". Asperger's paper ultimately saved hundreds, if not thousands, of Autistic children from been sent to the camps. His paper was published during wartime and in German, so it was not widely read elsewhere. In the later part of World War II Asperger served as a soldier in Croatia. He was habilitated as a lecturer at the University of Vienna in 1944 and became director of the children's clinic in 1946. He became professor at the university children's clinic – the Universitäts-Kinderklinik – in Innsbruck in 1957, and from 1962 held the same tenure in Vienna. From 1964 he headed the medical station of the SOS-Kinderdörfer (SOS Children's villages) in Hinterbrühl. Asperger was became professor emeritus in 1977. He was working until the last, delivering a lecture six days prior to his death on October 21st. His work was later translated from German and published, with English researcher Lorna Wing (who passed away June 6th 2014) proposing the name 'Asperger Syndrome' for the condition Hans had been studying in her groundbreaking 1981 academic paper Asperger Syndrome: a Clinical Account. The term became popularized and later became a standard diagnosis in 1992 in the World Health Organization Manual - although it wasn't made a standard diagnosis in the American Psychiatric Association's manual (the DSM-IV) until 1994. Today, in the DSM-V, it has been labelled as been a less severe version of Autism but it still exists on its own in the World Health Organization Manual. Hans Asperger's birthday, February 18, was declared International Asperger's Day. --- If Hans Aspergers was alive and if the language barrier wasn't a problem, I would have definitely have loved to have met him, just to see what kind of man he was like. Now, where did I park my TARDIS?
  2. If you could image your Autism / Aspergers as a living creature, what would you imagine it as? This is just to get your imagination going and they're no right or wrong answers - we're all different. The animal/creature you image your Autism/Aspergers to be can be as real, mythological or made up as you want it to be. I'll go first, just to get us going. If I could image my Aspergers as been like any animal, I would imagine it as been like a Dragon. My reason been that dragons are a mix of contrasts that can blend together in unique and unlikely ways. They can be gentle or menacing, beautiful or scary, wise or naiive, etc. Their abilities, colours, personalities and be able to exist in so many different places - both in the physical planes and beyond.
  3. Dr. Stephanie Seneff, research scientist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), made a dire prediction earlier this month during an event sponsored by the Groton Wellness organization. She said, Seneff was leading a presentation that showed a strong correlation between the increased use of Roundup starting in the early 1990’s and the rising number of autism diagnoses over the past three decades. In 1975, 1 in 5,000 children were diagnosed with autism. The current rate is 1 in 68, and it shows no sign of slowing down. “At today’s rate, by 2025, one in two children will be autistic.“ Roundup is a weed killer produced by Monsanto that contains glyphosate, a substance that has been shown to cause toxic side effects similar to those found in autism. Monsanto has also been producing genetically modified crops (GMOs) that are designed to withstand the effects of Roundup weed killer. The use of GMOs has come under fire in the United States during recent years. Dr. Seneff is a veteran researcher who has published several papers on the effects of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins. During her presentation, she explained how glyphosate kills beneficial gut bacteria and causes deficiencies in key minerals, including cobalt, iron, and manganese. Studies have shown that children with autism often have biomarkers indicative of excessive glyphosate, including zinc and iron deficiency, low serum sulfate, seizures, and mitochondrial disorder. Similar correlations between autism and glyphosate are also found in deaths caused by senility. She raised other frightening statistics, including studies that have shown that Americans have ten times the glyphosate accumulation as Europeans, and that glyphosate has been discovered in excessively high quantities in the breast milk of American mothers, as much as 760 to 1,600 the allowable limits in European drinking water. While it may be tempting to dismiss these findings as the extreme work of one researcher, it is important to note that Dr. Seneff is a respected scientist with an impressive background in research on nutritional deficiencies and the impact on environmental toxins. She has published 10 articles in various scientific journals, seven as head author, and she worked as a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. And while correlation does not necessarily indicate causation, the extremely high Pearson Correlation Coefficient score of 0.99 is difficult to ignore. This, combined with the extreme prevalence of foods containing GMOs that were likely treated with Roundup in the United States is enough to give anyone pause. Glyphosate can be found in soft drinks and candies sweetened by corn syrup, chips and cereals containing soy, and cattle and chicken fed soy. Basically, in the United States, it’s in just about any food that isn’t organic. Monsanto maintains that glyphosate and GMOs are safe, listing a series of studies on their website at http://www.monsanto.com/products/pages/roundup-safety-background-materials.aspx. To view the slides from Dr. Seneff’s presentation, follow this link http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/. Source Article: http://www.autismdailynewscast.com/warning-half-of-all-children-will-have-autism-by-2025/12873/laurel-joss/
  4. I'm not planning to tell my employers about my condition. I was just wondering what people thought about this question. Should you disclose your Aspergers to an employer. In my case, I probably should, having Aspergers weakens my ability to do my job in certain aspects, such as communication, social skills and often competency, I have a feeling they're already aware of my disability (or at least know I'm different), but I haven't said anything, and neither have they. Also, when applying for jobs, I tend to fiddle with the 'Do you consider yourself to have a disability' check box, with some applications, I tick it and others, I don't, because I believe I have a higher chance of getting the job if I say I don't. When I say applying for jobs, these are only retail jobs, and I've been in retail for 3 years, so I can handle whatever they may throw at me (I'd like to think I could).
  5. Which symptoms (or traits) of Asperger's Syndrome do you struggle with the most? For me, it's not being able to understand certain instructions, and not being able to understand humor, they really affect my interactions with people and make me feel insecure, because of this, I'm never fully sure what I'm meant to say, or how to reply to things, and is just really awkward
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.