Jump to content
Clockwork Crow

Aspergers vs High functioning Autism

Recommended Posts

Clockwork Crow

whats the differance between Aspergers and high functioning autism? apparently not that much.

 

atleast acording to the chaps over the see in USA who have recently rulled that from now on no more people will be diagnosed with Aspergers,

and instaid simply have High functioning Autism, and are just on the spectrum. 

 

- what do you think about this?

- glad that the two are seen side by side? or would you rather they be seen as differant?

- have others heard about it or have i been misinformed?

- do you think there is a clear differance between the two?

- or is the only differance people come up with the learning difficulty?

 

(sorry about all the questions i'm just curious)

 

post-5699-0-01417200-1395189131_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vcq14

Apparently this is old news (I found this story from 2011: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/AutismSymptomsDiagnosis/aspergers-syndrome-set-lose/story?id=13674552)

 

I had always assumed the two were the same (AS/HFA); then again, according to the above article the two are used interchangeably in the States.

 

Honestly? I prefer the term "HFA," as my fear when people hear "Asperger's" is they think "retarded," not "savant." I like having "high-functioning" in the title (thank you Sherlock! ;) ) so there is no confusion that my IQ is on the lower end of the scale, thank you very much. (I always thought the "high-functioning sociopath" line by BBC Sherlock was a inside nod to "HFA"). It seems more self-explanatory than "Asperger's," which only tells someone that it was named after a particular doctor.

 

I do like the following observation from the above article:

 

"The term "high-functioning" refers to language and intellectual ability -- skills that set Asperger's apart from other disorders on the spectrum. But Jekel worries that removing the term "Asperger's" might open the door for misinterpreting it as just a mild form of autism.

 

"For many, Asperger's is not mild," she said. "If you have an IQ that's fairly high and you're verbal, people expect you to be like everyone else and get along in the world. But this is something that really can be very, very difficult for people to live with."

Edited by vcq14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clockwork Crow

hehe i still think its funny its called a spectrum... i always think of rainbows from white light - but i guess thats exactly how it is

post-5699-0-76881700-1395194902_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ala

In Australia they now diagnose all forms of high functioning autism as Autism Spectrum Disorder. I think that people are more aware of the term "autism" and with the word spectrum in the classification it implies that nobody is the same, so maybe it might redefine the public perception of Aspergers in that the name suggest that it doesn't manifest in one particular way.

From my understanding High Functioning Autism is diagnosed when there are developmental delays in language acquisition during childhood. Now, I imagine, Autism specialists when they write academic papers are no longer separating these developmental delays with other developmental delays. And so due to the pervasive understanding that the characteristics of the higher forms of autism are individually unique and on a spectrum, the categorical terms once used to describe different kinds of HFA have now perceived as being redundant and inaccurate when writing academic papers. I guess this academic perspective on terminology is now just running off into diagnostic practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jenny.wren76

It's fine with me. It is now just called Autism Spectrum Disorder- and just because someone is verbal that does not mean that they are any more or less 'functioning' in my opinion. I think 'High Functioning" is a label for ableists.

I may be verbal but my coping skills are not very good. I can't work because being around other people stresses me out so much I get physically ill. I can't handle very much stress at all, I start shutting down. Or rather, all my energy is already used up dealing with major stressors that most people don't deal with and I have none leftover for the little things. We are a military family so we move a lot. My husband deploys for months at a time. I have four children on the spectrum and I homeschool them. We don't live near family so we are on our own. Lots of family drama (extended family). I just can't cope well if I go to the store for something specific and they don't have it. Know what I mean?

Does that mean I don't 'function'? Or does that mean I do function exceptionally well given my disabilities? (OCD, bipolar type 2, anxiety/panic disorder, sensitivities to lights, certain types of sounds, smells, patterns)

There have been quite a few stories of autistic people who were assumed to be not bright at all and couldn't communicate at all till they were much older. Their family assumed they had nothing to say and then one day they start typing on a laptop or tablet and they are brilliant. Just because someone's body doesn't work the same way as another persons doensn't mean that they don't function as well as a person, as someone who has a 'normal' body. People adapt.



Just because someone doesn't have the ability to communicate does not mean they are not intelligent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I don't think it really matters. I just think that people have a set of symptoms and some symptoms are really bad and some are mild but the fact that you have them means you are Autistic.

I have had too many people assume that everything will be fine and that I will just get on with no help because of the 'Aspergers/High Functioning' label. Everyone with Autism is completely different so a person still has to figure everything out even with the classification labels. I don't know what the formal definitions are but that is my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
L Lawliet

Honestly? I prefer the term "HFA," as my fear when people hear "Asperger's" is they think "retarded,"

 

So far, when I've told people, they have been curious about Asperger's and start off asking me some questions and stuff. Then as soon as I even mention the word Autism or ASD, they react differently. That's when I usually get the comment "But you don't look autistic"

 

So I actually find it's the opposite for me. I like the word Asperger's :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DominikaCupcake

I like Aspergers to be separated from autism because it is slightly different and for the same reason that StarGazingWithU mentioned. But at the same time if we put them in one and the same diagnosis it would be easier for people to understand. Generally people know more of autism than aspergers. If asked "what's the difference between autism and aspergers" i often need a little more time to reply correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nesf

My understanding has always been that the distinction between HFA and AS is more relevant for a childhood diagnosis because the essential difference between them is that there is a speech delay with HFA, and not with AS (unless you are using the Gilberg criteria). Theoretically, once a child with HFA learns to speak and reaches adulthood, there is no great distinction between the two. In practice, however, from what I understand people with HFA are affected more greatly by autism that those with AS, mainly because of the speech delay they had when they were children. They often have more pronounced symptoms, particularly with speech and sensory integration issues, which are present but not so noticeable in a person with mild AS. But there are plenty of people with HFA who are very high functioning such as Temple Grandin and Stephen Wiltshire, who, I guess, present in a similar way to a person with AS, so the distinction becomes blurred.

 

I was diagnosed with Asperger's Disorder according to the DSM-IV, and that's how it appears in my medical records, so that's what I tell people I have, if and when the need arises. As AS and HFA belong to the same spectrum, I have no objections to the label of HFA or ASD, but in either case I would clarify that my diagnosis is of AS, because I'm on the milder end of the spectrum and had no speech delay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sofi

I agree with Nesf. I have HFA and I definitely feel like I have that rather than Aspergers, I don't feel like I have Aspergers at all.

I had significant speech delay and all global developmental delay as a child but actually, the developmental delay has continued all through my life as that I have always been behind/or never reached with all milestones (teenager milestones), even now and it'll probably continue that way all through my life. I have learning disability in general that is more common in Autism, whereas Aspergers seems much more of advanced/average intelligence, rather than below average or learning disability. 

The difference did get smaller since I learnt speech and learnt more things but still I feel more affected with Autism than Aspergers people do. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.