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What do you do?

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Willow
Old stuff only, as despite being a photographer, I always forget to photograph my work (more the case I think of get rid of it as soon as possible as I have taken as much as I have taken as much as I can out of the piece and when it is finished, I always think I could have done better, so get rid fast)

 

But ;

 

doingsr_zps6cb67762.jpg

These are great :D

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filamentous hyphae

Andy, the craftsmanship on the jewelry is quite nice.

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Erythrura

Wow...Andy, you're amazing!  :o  :D  Great work! 

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aspiegirl

I work as an IT-administrator. It requires a lot of interaction with other people, which can be exhausting.. I don't want to complain because I like being part of the "normal" world in a way. I just wish it wasn't so frequent :)

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Chicken_55

I trained as a geologist and got a good job working for 5 years on oil rigs in the North Sea, Onshore UK and Spain.   But I did not know about Aspergers at that time and crashed and burned.  Horribly.  It was to do with interaction with other people; I could do the geology but I could not multi-task very well and could not tell when people were being serious or "only joking".

 

Then I got a job with the Civil Service in London but it was sheer hell.  I did not enjoy the work and was hoping to secure a transfer to geology-related work within the Civil Service.   But it was never going to happen, my work suffered, (still to do with communication - I was labelled as "aloof" on the staff reports) and my reports were so bad no other department would consider me on transfer.  After 17 years of this I had another horrible breakdown.  

 

It was only then that I found out about Aspergers and set my sights a little lower.  I moved back home with my parents and managed to get a job as a part time book-keeper at a health food store.  This job is fine and suits me down to the ground.  Doing accountancy is a bit like being paid to do suduko and I am perfectly at home with the computer and out of sight of the customers.  But, sadly, this is only 4 hours a week and does not pay the bills.

 

Then a couple of years later I got a job at a supermarket - also working part time - so I am currently working 16 hours a week in both jobs.  The supermarket job is a real struggle - if I was paid on the basis of effort I would be the best paid supermarket assistant in the company.   I have such difficulty with sensory issues, the bleeps and clicks from electronic equipment, children shrieking and screeches from the stock cages set my nerves on edge.  As well as this, I have an awful time with multi-tasking and constant interruptions.  As well as this there is problems with strip lighting which hurts my eyes, and the strong smells (food, cleaning chemicals and smells from the air conditioning).  Then there are the customers who are being facetious.  I hate it when people say they are "only joking".  I can never work this out:- I take everything literally and it is a constant source of worry to try to interpret what a customer really means when they talk to me.   I am hopeless at eye contact and find looking at people's eyes is just too intense.  I have been reprimanded by a colleague for not making eye contact with the customers.   On the surface, I probably seem to cope but underneath I am grappling all the time with my nerves and find it so difficult to stop shaking.

 

To make matters worse, I have severe face blindness and cannot recognise customers or staff, especially if I bump into them in town out of the supermarket context.   This is why I get a reputation for being aloof - I just don't know who they are.   Whether it is the Aspergers I am  not sure, but I cannot tell easily which is "left" or "right".  It takes me a long while to work this out and if a customer asks for the piece of cheese on the "right", it takes me ages realise where the piece of cheese he wants actually is.

 

I am thinking of donating my brain to science when I die - just so that someone else does not have to go through the struggles I have in my daily life.  If someone could wave a magic wand and I could be cured I would be so relieved.  

 

Sorry to go on, having a job might seem to be wonderful for someone with Aspergers but it is not all plain sailing.   We need a lot of support to keep in employment and in these days of fierce competition for jobs and austerity people do not have time for anybody who has any sensitivities or disabilities.  I have disclosed my Aspergers to my bosses but not to my colleagues as I do not want them to find a reason to shun me or treat me like an imbecile.  In my experience people do not like anything that is "different" or they do not understand, and, even in this day and age people do not know anything about Aspergers.

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Toran

I can empathise with you chicken I have had many of the issues you have mentioned and its certainly very difficult to adapt into the work environment. I wasnt too bad when I left school got a job in a factory for 16 years it wasnt easy but I got through it somehow. Then I got made redundent and since then ive had numerous jobs because it was so difficult to adapt to so many new things and some people were plain nasty. Ive had a job now for six years but that was working on my own driving there was still problems but all I could do was keep going best I could. Then it all changed and I had to work with others again and the old problems resurfaced until eventually I couldnt cope and ended up being unable to cope with it and been off sick since.

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Chicken_55

Thank you for your kind reply, Toran.  

 

I hope that things improve for you in your work environment and that you will be able to return to work soon.

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Toran
Thank you for your kind reply, Toran.  

 

I hope that things improve for you in your work environment and that you will be able to return to work soon.

Thanks chicken hopefully things are moving in the right direction now and things will begin to improve.

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Aspergirl

I can understand the sensory and social problems of being in the work place completely! I have struggled in the work place all my life but had no idea about Aspergers until the last 6 months to a year! It was only my daughter struggling in school and meeting people with similar children that has brought it into the open for me! I now realise what has been happening my whole life is down to AS!

 

I am constantly surprised at how much I have done and how far I have come despite it, but it explains so so much.

 

I had a lot of jobs, pubs, supermarkets, admin etc in my teens and early 20's but non of these environments suited me socially and played havoc with my senses!

 

The best job I have ever done is being a groom in a racing yard, riding, mucking out, brushing the horses it was all very theraputic. I got my own horse when I was 14 and this was my special interest all through my childhood. I actually went to college to try and make a career out of it but the highly competitive environment of equestrian college wasn't me and I went off the rails due to being alone, living in and not being able to organise myself. I left college with qualifications enough to get me into a teaching degree (with some good personal statement writing) and after doing a few weeks work experience in my old primary felt this was the way to go.

 

During my first week of uni, I found out I was pregnant with Ellie! The three years of my degree were a constant struggle, through pregnancy, birth and bringing up a baby alongside a full-time degree I had many mental health problems due to the stress and anxiety of leaving my little one. I am surprised I go through it and proud I did but I almost failed/ dropped out many times. I managed to get a good degree due to sheer grit and determination to show the doubters what I could do but nearly gave myself a nervous breakdown in the process.

 

After my degree my partner and I decided to get married and had another baby! This brought yet more stress into our relationship and has meant that I have never actually yet gone on to teach. I have worked 1 year in a preschool as an assistant and then 18 months as a childminder. My daughter (Eldest) has struggled so much with school and my commitments have been too much. I have decided to stop work and now recieve DLA and CA for my daughter as a full-time carer and stay at home mum. I love them to pieces but I can't cope with the lack of structure and not using my brain!

 

I find staying at home far more strenuous than working, even in those environments that I hated!

 

I am unsure if I will ever find the right balance but keep telling myself it will get better when they get older. I won't have anymore children as much as I would love to because I know I wouldn't mentally be able to cope and I want to have a career at some point for my own self- worth.

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Nesf

I worked for many years as a teacher of English as a foreign language, mainly because I was pursuing special interests in languages and cultures of other countries and this was a convenient way of doing it. However, teaching is particulary demanding for a person on the spectrum, especially an undiagnosed one, and I eventually couldn't cope with it any more and crashed, and received my diagnosis of AS and Major Depressive Disorder. Now I do a few online lessons, some proofreading and translating - I'm currently working on a novel - and looking for more permanent employment.

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