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TriforceOfPower

I've always had a hard time understanding nonverbal cues. When my parents would try to tell me something by giving me looks/hand gestures, I couldn't (and still can't) understand what they were trying to say. Does anyone else have this problem? How do you cope and learn these cues?

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Kuribo [old account]

This is quite a complicated issue for me. I thought for a long time that I was a lot better at understanding these than many Autistic people, but it's really just that I find them difficult in a different way. I have a basic understanding of most facial expressions, but I misinterpret them easily, mostly by drastically overestimating the emotion they represent. For example, I might assume that someone is thinking negative thoughts about me when in reality, they're just somewhat confused. This is amplified by my low self-esteem, a problem that's slowly improving.

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PandaPrincess

Really, I think that the main problems I have with reading facial expressions occurs when I am doing a presentation or explaining something to members in a group project, and the other members have a look on their face that is either one of concentration or confusion.  I can't tell which, so the whole time I am thinking "uh oh, they probably don't understand a word i am trying to say to them, and they probably think i'm stupid too."  :mellow:

 

Here is an example of the face that they make, but I'm pretty sure that they never tilt their head to the side like that when they are making it, which makes it more confusing because tilting your head to the side and making that face is a clear sign of confusion, but if you're not tilting your head, then it is hard to tell.

 

This picture is a picture of our president btw.  Ha ha  :P

 

2013.11.15-mrconservative-528649af39bb9.

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thegingerone

I always thought that I was pretty good at reading nonverbal cues until we did a worksheet in English a few years ago looking at body language in creative writing.  They had listed something like 20 different body languages and we had to work in groups to put 3 possible meanings to each

 

Lets just say that lesson didn't go well for me. 

 

If I'm unsure if somebody is confused or something, I tend to ask them and hope they don't take it the wrong way.

Edited by AlzEilir

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aspiesw

I'm hopeless at reading non-verbal cues. Some are obvious, and I'm ok with those, more complex ones I'm hopeless at, it's really hard, especially when I'm in 'act' mode, but it's life, and you have to deal with it. If I don't understand a non-verbal cue, I ask them to explain what they mean

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pianissimo

If the facial expression is very obvious it is easy to understand- like someone who is really, really angry or really, really happy. Everything in between which is more subtle I tend to get wrong or have problems with. 

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Nesf

I know all the basic facial expressions and can read them in movies or on TV - I may miss the more subtle nuances, but pick up on the basic emotions of the characters. The difficultiy comes when it comes to real life conversations. In real life conversations I need to do several things: listen, interpret, watch, pay attention to my own body language, think, speak. I only ever seem to be able do one of these at one time - so when I speak, listen, think or concentrate on my body language, my visual processing is temporarily closed down, and won't turn on gain until I've finished speaking, or whatever it was I was doing. I think NTs may experience this too to some extent, I really don't know, but I find it hard to switch focus from one input to another. So I literally don't see the changes in expression on another person's face - my eyes are open but I don't process the information. So I don't pick up on nearly as many non-verbal cues when I'm talking to someone - or I notice them, but become temporarily speechless and don't reply straight away because I'm trying to interpret them. If I'm in a group and the others are talking I notice far more, because I'm not speaking and there's less to concentrate on at once. I read in a book that this having one channel open at a time and switching off others is a way to prevent sensory overload. Makes sense.

Edited by Nesf

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L Lawliet

I thought I was really good at reading people, until I did the test in my assessment for Aspergers. I did really badly! It certainly explains a lot :P

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Nesf

I thought I was really good at reading people, until I did the test in my assessment for Aspergers. I did really badly! It certainly explains a lot :P

What test was that?

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L Lawliet

What test was that?

 

I can't remember the actual name of it, but they showed me photos of the top half of people faces and asked me what emotion they were showing. Then they showed the rest of the photo and asked if they're emotion had changed at all. I also had to read different scenarios and state whether I thought someone was being rude or inappropriate for that scenario. Failed at that too :P

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