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TriforceOfPower

Self Diagnosis

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TriforceOfPower
  • How many people on here are self-diagnosed?
  • What do you think of people who self-diagnose?
  • How do you deal with people who disapprove of your self-diagnosis?

 

 

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Kuribo [old account]

I'm officially-diagnosed, but this is a topic that matters to me.
 

What do you think of people who self-diagnose?


I have no problem whatsoever with self-diagnosed people. I usually advise people that they needn't bother seeking an official diagnosis unless doing so would help them to access services and support, particularly if they live in a country where it costs money to get an assesment. There exists a small minority of people who falsely self-diagnose for attention, but they really are just a small minority.

I often feel sorry for them due to the unjustified hostility and bullying they find themselves victims of on sites such as WrongPlanet.net.
 

How do you deal with people who disapprove of your self-diagnosis?

 

Even as an officially-diagnosed person, I can't stand people like this. When a self-diagnosed person comes to a forum for support and ends up being deliberately made to feel unwelcome by some asshole who thinks he automatically knows them better than they do, I always try to stand up for the self-diagnosed person. Moderators on other sites aren't nearly as strict about bullying based on diagnosis status as they should be.

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RiRi

I'm self-diagnosed. The reason is because, like Kuribo said, I just found out not too long ago and as an adult there aren't many services provided. The only reason why I think I would need an official diagnosis is if in case someone at work maltreats me or something along those lines. Getting a diagnosis is expensive out here especially since I have no medical insurance. 

 

What I think about people who self-diagnose is that they must have their reasons for doing it as such and I don't think negatively of them. I would advise, however, that if they have the money and or resources to get an official diagnosis to do it. 

 

How I deal with people who disapprove of my self-diagnosis is I ignore them. Unless, it's a really close family member, I would try to prove it to them. Otherwise, I'd just let them be because even sometimes psychiatrists/psychologists have misdiagnosed. I think that when we objectively see ourselves, we are the ones that know more about ourselves than anyone else. 

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Nesf

I'm diagnosed officially, but I wasn't diagnosed until 2 years ago at the age or 41. Before then I was an undiagnosed, then self-diagnosed Aspie, now I'm a diagnosed one, but I've always been an Aspie. It's a condition for life - I wasn't any less an Aspie when I was self-diagnosed than I am now. I know that there are many self-diagnosed or late diagnosed older adults, due to the fact that AS wasn't recognised as an officially diagnosable condition until 1994. I think that about 90% of those who self-diagnose do actually have ASD - mostly they have done a lot of research before they come to that conclusion, and it's not a conclusion one comes to lightly - after all it is a lifelong condition with many implications for the person and their family. And even if it turns out that one doesn't have ASD but something else with similar symptoms, such as ADHD, OCD or Social Anxiety, or if they have ASD but have developed enough coping devices for it to be subclinical, that person may still have considerable difficulties and need the help and support of the ASD community. Also, it is unfair to judge a person on their diagnostic status where a diagnosis can cost a lot of money and it can be so difficult to get referred to the right specialist, especially as an adult. If it hadn't been for my mum helping me out financially I may never have got diagnosed.

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DominikaCupcake

I am self-diagnosed and i've been thinking of getting an official diagnosis, but i am still considering pros and cons of such a decision. Like Anna says, there is no much help for adults with aspergers and since i lived 21 years without this help, then i might as well survive the rest of my life. Besides, if i'll have the official diagnosis it will help me to get employed as the government will give me the job or just money so i could sit home and do nothing for the rest of my life. But that's not what i want and with the diagnosis you can't do some types of the jobs here in Norway which means that i qualify only for things that stereotypical people think every Aspie is good it. PCs and engineering. It pisses me off that some people think this way. I want to be a teacher and i think that staying self-diagnosed would be the best option for me.

 

However, maybe if i'll get official diagnosis people will start taking this seriously, because so far every laughs at it tells me that i'm just odd and should hang out with people more. When i was talking with my doctor yesterday and i decided to tell her that i think that i have aspergers and i am considering getting the diagnosis, she asked me: "Who told you this?". So i told her that i'm sef-diagnosed and she replied: "And how can you possibly now? Please, stop wasting my time."

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Dr-David-Banner

I really don't worry about my self diagnosis situation. I also tend to have strong feelings over the way some countries seem to be charging parents large sums of money to get their kids diagnosed. To my mind it's a bit like making money out of an individual's struggle to cope with a situation that is genetic yet can cause significant stress. Another bone of contention I think is I was never offered any real help with autism spectrum as a kid even though it was obvious there was an issue. True, there was no awareness of aspergers back then but eventually, as information sifted out online, I think it became my discovery. It was something I pieced together with an open mind over a few months. Also, I think the main thing always to have in mind is all of this boils down to major difficulties in social interaction. The emphasis is on how to deal with that. Usually those of us who either have a diagnosis or not share significant difficulties as to employment, social interaction friendships and so on. I think my main priority is finding an explanation and coping strategies for that.
Funny thing is, I now seem to have been "outed". A few days ago a woman in a shop who knows me started talking to me about autism. She kept saying she'd heard people with autism can be really clever and do all sorts of things and I got the impression she wanted to get me talking about it. Maybe she had family who had aspergers. The truth is, though, with me it's not hard to work out something isn't quite normal. People have found me strange for years and that includes family. I seem to have it very strong and impossible to hide no matter how I try.

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Xenolith

I do have problems with self-diagnosis. Obviously there are going to be plenty of people who have self-diagnosed correctly, and I'm not making any accusations that people here don't actually have Asperger's. However, as most of you will be aware, Asperger's is being massively overdiagnosed. I can't help but feel that a lot of people who are just socially awkward, quiet, introverted or just plain unfriendly or tactless masquerade around with the label of Asperger's completely unfairly. Plenty of people aren't social butterflies, that doesn't mean you've got a mental health condition. 

 

If you think you've got Asperger's and it's imposing a serious impact on your life and well-being, you should get a formal diagnosis. I don't understand how self-diagnosis can really help. Unless you've got documents of proof, your self-diagnosis isn't really going to get you any support.

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Kuribo [old account]

However, as most of you will be aware, Asperger's is being massively overdiagnosed.

Sources?

 

I don't understand how self-diagnosis can really help.

It can help people to understand why they are the way they are and connect with others like them online.

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RiRi

In addition to Kuribo's response..

 

I can't help but feel that a lot of people who are just socially awkward, quiet, introverted or just plain unfriendly or tactless masquerade around with the label of Asperger's completely unfairly. Plenty of people aren't social butterflies, that doesn't mean you've got a mental health condition. 

 

Who have you seen are this way? or do you just feel like this is how it is?? All those things you've mentioned "socially awkward, quiet, introverted..." are not the only things that describe a person with Aspergers (I hope you know that). In person, I could possibly be a "social butterfly" that doesn't mean that I'm neurotypical/don't have Aspergers.

 

 

 

If you think you've got Asperger's and it's imposing a serious impact on your life and well-being, you should get a formal diagnosis. I don't understand how self-diagnosis can really help. Unless you've got documents of proof, your self-diagnosis isn't really going to get you any support.

 

I agree with Kuribo, a self-diagnosis, it has loads helped me. It has given me some insight as to why I act a certain way and it has also helped me "correct" some things. If I had money, I would have been gotten a diagnosis. As a matter of fact, I'm saving up to get an official diagnosis. At this point, for me, there's limited, if any support outside, not much for that matter. Also, I don't think there's been over diagnosis of Aspergers, if anything I'd say there's been an under diagnosis. However, a "professional" telling me I have Aspergers doesn't validate that I have it/don't have it. These people have misdiagnosed many times leaning toward the "you don't have Aspergers" side, at least speaking from a girl's point of view. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664105

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Kuribo [old account]

Who have you seen are this way? or do you just feel like this is how it is??

 

Chlorophile, something I forgot to mention is that I regularly attend social groups run by a service with over 800 registered users. Not once have I witnessed the phenomena you describe.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't you say that you've only met something like five other Aspies at school?

 

However, a "professional" telling me I have Aspergers doesn't validate that I have it/don't have it. These people have misdiagnosed many times leaning toward the "you don't have Aspergers" side, at least speaking from a girl's point of view. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664105

When I was five years old, a doctor told my mum that it wouldn't even be worth getting me assessed, and that I showed no signs of AS whatsoever. Thankfuly, a senior professional happened to be working in the same room, and realised how absurd that statement was. If it weren't for her objection to the first doctor's conclusion, we likely would have had to fight for several more years in order to gain access to the necessary support services.

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