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Willow

What age did you get diagnosed?

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Alex
I have a question that I have always wanted to know the answer to: I have aspergers, but does that make me autistic? As in, people with autism are autistic, but are people with aspergers also autistic? Like would I (not that I'd want to) be able to say that I'm autistic?

I think that, since Aspergers is on the Autism Spectrum, you can say that you are autistic. But I also have the impression that people tend to think "Rain Man" (as in a more severely autistic person) when they hear that someone is autistic, which is probably caused by the media mostly showing severely autistic people, and thus not informing neuro typicals as much about mildly autistic diagnosis (like Asperger's Syndrome). So I feel that it's more convenient to just say that you have Asperger's, and then explaining that it's a kind of autism afterwards.

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Willow
I think that, since Aspergers is on the Autism Spectrum, you can say that you are autistic. But I also have the impression that people tend to think "Rain Man" (as in a more severely autistic person) when they hear that someone is autistic, which is probably caused by the media mostly showing severely autistic people, and thus not informing neuro typicals as much about mildly autistic diagnosis (like Asperger's Syndrome). So I feel that it's more convenient to just say that you have Asperger's, and then explaining that it's a kind of autism afterwards.

Yeah I agree - whilst it would be nice to say Aspergic, it's easier to say Aspergers and explain it's a form of Autism - at least until Aspergic is widely recognised :D

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Whoknows

You know, I never really cared about my age when that happened, because my parents raised me like if I was Clark Kent. Then, they told me about it in high school. Nothing happened at all. I just broke the mold.

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Heather
It seems like a lot of people get diagnosed in their late teens. I wish there was something more prominent in an Aspie child which prompted people to look for a diagnosis earlier.

 

As a child I was very quite around people, although my Mum said I was extremely agitated as a baby and would cry all the time. I played alone, with toys other children didn't find interesting, or I would play with them in a way they weren't intended for. I was quick to learn and knew my number and alphabet before I started school and progressed through the levels of reading very quickly. But none of these are classed as negative things, at least, not enough to spark any attention from school or therapists. :(

 

What were like as a child, those of you who were diagnosed in their late teens?

 

Apparently I was an extremely shy/quiet child.  Though I think my mother said I was a fairly contented baby.  I had a few seizures when I was about 2 years old, probably due to a body temperature problem, that have since not happened since I was a small child (my mom found, when they were coming due to a fever I'd get, she would give me garlic and they'd go away), and my dad apparently had them too when he was younger. 

 

I played alone mostly.  Though I did play with my sisters sometimes I think.  I was a stereotypical girl in the fact that I liked playing with dolls, especially baby dolls, though I did play with barbies sometimes.  I either played with them by myself or with my younger sister, as my older sister didn't care much for them.  I think to other people and even to myself looking back on it, my play with dolls looked pretty normal for a young girl.  Though I remember I played with them to a later age than most of my peers.  One day, I think around grade 6 or 7, I realized (I'm not sure why, maybe some kids were talking about it), I realized kids my age didn't play with them any more and I shouldn't either, so I put them in a box..

 

Also, I read some reports from my preschool teachers, and I always played alone at preschool, and even when kids tried to play with me I would just go off and play by myself somewhere else.  I didn't remember that so much, I thought kids just didn't come and play with me.  I didn't realize I actually moved away from where I was when they came and tried to play there too!  lol

 

When I got to elementary/primary school, I was still a very shy child, and found it hard to go to the bathroom at school, because I didn't want to go during class and interrupt it, and I didn't want to go when we were supposed to be outside at recess/lunch time!  And I remember I would end up walking around the school campus by myself most recess/lunch breaks, unless someone specifically asked to hang out with me and would wait for me to put my shoes on.. because I observed other students asking each other to wait until they got their shoes on.  (Indoor/outdoor shoes?  Probably pretty common in most elementary schools??)

 

As I've analysed my past behavior, and looked at how it was affected by my AS.  One way was that I always mimicked people (one aspect noted in many girls with AS).  I was quiet until I knew the "rules" and did not want to do anything that might be against them.  I even was "friends" with girls who didn't care what others thought.  But really, I cared what these girls who didn't care what others thought thought of me!  I think I often mimicked my older sister too.. she liked reading, I liked reading, and I did do very well with reading and writing, and most of my school work during elementary school especially.

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Willow

@squeeker I remember having dolls as a child but I only played with them when I had a big car which they could sit in and I could roll around. My main toys were small cars, which I organized by colour and line up. I also had a toy multi storey car park with a winding road/ramp type thing and I used to put the cars and the top and let go to see which one went the furthest. Oh, and I painstakingly cut out road markings from white paper and made a car park. :)

 

When I was really young, I used to mix up jigsaw puzzle pieces in a mixing bowl, with a wooden spon :)

 

I'm not sure if I moved away from children, but I don't recall playing with anyone either. I had a couple of friends, but they left the school :(

 

I was much the same as you about the bathroom thing. I found it an awkward experience, more so as I got older and girls got nastier.

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Heather
@squeeker I remember having dolls as a child but I only played with them when I had a big car which they could sit in and I could roll around. My main toys were small cars, which I organized by colour and line up. I also had a toy multi storey car park with a winding road/ramp type thing and I used to put the cars and the top and let go to see which one went the furthest. Oh, and I painstakingly cut out road markings from white paper and made a car park. :)

 

When I was really young, I used to mix up jigsaw puzzle pieces in a mixing bowl, with a wooden spon :)

 

I'm not sure if I moved away from children, but I don't recall playing with anyone either. I had a couple of friends, but they left the school :(

 

I was much the same as you about the bathroom thing. I found it an awkward experience, more so as I got older and girls got nastier.

Aww that's cute!  Ahh something you wrote just reminded me of legos.  I remember playing with them a bit, we had the chunky lego and the little lego, and we could build houses and things.  And then that reminded me of playing Donkey Kong on the Nintendo 64 with my younger sister and her friend, but instead of the battling we were supposed to do, we played house.  There was baby diddy kong, and the little girl monkey, and then a "mom" and "dad" lol  I also remember having a little jeep for my barbie children ("Kelly" and "Tommy") and that was pretty neat.  I'm not sure if part of it was because I grew up with two sisters and no brothers, though out of them all, I was probably the one most into dolls.  I also had the little strollers to push the dolls in.  I had my "Water baby" doll which I loved and would bring when we went to visit my grandparents who lived out of town.

 

That's so cute that you would mix up jigsaw puzzle pieces in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon... I feel like that would have been something I would have done as a young child too.  Though I can't remember doing that exactly, I just remember liking to play house a lot.  I never had any of those road/ramp things for cars, but they did look cool.  I think the making the carpark with the white paper sounds interesting.  I think maybe maybe it's a fascination with mimicking real life scenarios, maybe to understand the world better? 

 

I was pretty lucky, I went to one school for the bulk of my elementary school education, grades kindergarten to grade 6, and when I went to my next school, I knew two girls (one girl had previously been at my old school, and the other girl went to our church).  Oh I also remember as a child, hating substitute teachers.  I had a few bad experiences with them.  I think it's due to not being able to handle change well either.  I'm glad to read similar experiences and share my own.

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KnarlyDUDE09

<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="WillowHope" data-cid="80" data-time="1358102581"><p>

I didn't really get any support either. The best thing you can do is look at what stops you from doing things you enjoy/things you need to get done and figure out a way to cope with it better. I know it's hard, but once you can start to break through some of the barriers, it gets easier. And, to be fair, I'm not sure what support is actually widely available.</p></blockquote>Thanks for the advice, Willow. :)

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Willow

@squeeker Hmm, the only 'games' I played were ones where I was teacher and I would do spelling tests and what not. I did mimick real things, I never really played in a way that couldn't happen in real life.

 

My first school was split into two sites at different ends of my village, so for 3 years you were in the lower building and then I think 4 years in the upper building. Switching to the upper was difficult because it pretty much meant never seeing my teachers from the lower school again. Then after that I went to secondary school which lasts 5 years, but I had to leave after 2 and go to a different school because of bullying, but then I got bullied at my new school and left after about 6 months - mostly because they had a new building built for them and I didn't like the new one at all - the change was too much for me to handle on top of the bullies.

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Willow
<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="WillowHope" data-cid="80" data-time="1358102581"><p>

I didn't really get any support either. The best thing you can do is look at what stops you from doing things you enjoy/things you need to get done and figure out a way to cope with it better. I know it's hard, but once you can start to break through some of the barriers, it gets easier. And, to be fair, I'm not sure what support is actually widely available.</p></blockquote>Thanks for the advice, Willow. :)

No problem :D

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specialstar
I think that, since Aspergers is on the Autism Spectrum, you can say that you are autistic. But I also have the impression that people tend to think "Rain Man" (as in a more severely autistic person) when they hear that someone is autistic, which is probably caused by the media mostly showing severely autistic people, and thus not informing neuro typicals as much about mildly autistic diagnosis (like Asperger's Syndrome). So I feel that it's more convenient to just say that you have Asperger's, and then explaining that it's a kind of autism afterwards.

 

I was told that people now see rain man in these days are high functioning

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