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What Is Aspergers Syndrome? by WillowHope

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Dr-David-Banner

According to some articles I just read, my initial suspicions are shared by many. The bottom line is nobody ever really "pinned" Asperger's definition of autistic psychopathy into an accurately defined diagnosis. Too many experts contradict each other. For example it was stated HFA alone caused early age reading delays yet I find all the Asperger kids originally had major learning issues. Dyspraxia was also part of the autistic psychopathy phenomenon. Crucially, all Asperger's patients only fell under his radar due to learning issues in mainstream school and unorthodox information processing. This led to Asperger Syndrome being scrapped as a diagnosis which may be a fundamental mistake. Myself being kind of tight fisted I seek to avoid paying for a site as, besides, interest is low. My goal is to make my site for free and to do my best to "define" what autistic psycopathy really was. This is tough as for me too Asperger's is very hard to get to the essence. At the Vienna clinic they studied voice modulation, co-ordination, eye movement, IQ testing, genetics and  information processing. It was way ahead of modern psychology as the patients were observed 24 hours over months. So long as I find a way to build my site for free I hope to republish all Asperger's studies. I did notice web design has moved on so I struggle to find a web builder I can use. It will probably be Ukoz which gives a free domain. It will not be a forum but just tests and diagnostic issues. 

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Dr-David-Banner

Very controversial is Hans Asperger's claim that females never fully met the criteria for his autistic psychopathy. This he asserts is due to differences between the male and female brain. Girls were classified as concrete thinkers and boys more abstract. Autistic psychopathy showed extremes in abstract thinking processes. That means a larger analysis of patterns and associations. So psychopathy is seen as a dominant genetic phenomenon. Going by what Asperger wrote my guess is female autists inherited male, dominant genes and my second "guess" is females show the symptoms differently. All the female autists I ever met did show certain tomboyish traits. My website is very slowly being put together although I struggle with the programming. The idea I have is to try and represent Aspergers exactly as it was in the forties with no tip-toeing around or getting bogged down with sensitivities. 

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Dr-David-Banner

Something I never fully understood till I explored this recent removal of A.S. as a diagnosis to be replaced by autism spectrum. There was a big and ongoing argument. One group took the view AS is not autism but a distinct personality disorder. The other group considered it to be autism. One leading psychologist stated in a paper too many consultants were struggling but part of the truth may be the lack of experts available. Myself I think it's clear people experienced autism spectrum differently. For me it was definitely autism with developmental delay but for others it may be more non verbal language and communication issues. Now if I understand correctly the new emphasis is just on autism and possibly other symptoms viewed as part of the spectrum. One thing that sprang to mind is prosopagnosia too is not experienced by people in the same way. I really struggle to recognise faces but I can recognise photos. Yet some people can't recognise photos of faces. It's been found there are different types of prosopagnosia. A week ago I had a woman tell me she'd found she couldn't recognise cars either. For me this is true as well. I'd always stuggle to locate a car that had been parked. I think if I took clinical test for prosopagnosia I'd not be diagnosed with it and yet I frequently fail to recognise people. 

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Sanctuary
14 hours ago, Dr-David-Banner said:

 I really struggle to recognise faces but I can recognise photos. Yet some people can't recognise photos of faces. It's been found there are different types of prosopagnosia. A week ago I had a woman tell me she'd found she couldn't recognise cars either. For me this is true as well. I'd always stuggle to locate a car that had been parked. I think if I took clinical test for prosopagnosia I'd not be diagnosed with it and yet I frequently fail to recognise people. 

I'm not great at recognising faces but on the whole I manage. However I do struggle when I see "faces out of context", e.g. if I see someone from work while out shopping or walking down the street. I struggle to make the connection and also worry about making a wrong recognition so if I think I've spotted someone I prefer to wait and see if they recognise me. By contrast I'm very good at remembering names and other biographical information, perhaps because I learn much better verbally rather than visually.

The car example is an interesting one. I'm struck by how many people (mostly men) can instantly recognise not just models but often editions of cars, sometimes from many years ago. I can only recognise cars with the most distinctive shapes such as Minis and Beetles. Clearly to some degree this is related to interest in cars but it can go deeper than that. Maybe for some people cars seem to have faces and they can recognise a car they've seen before just as the they would recognise a familiar person. Even if I studied pictures of cars continually I don't think I would ever come close to that proficiency. The same may apply to visually recognising other things such as types of plant or tree.

 

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Dr-David-Banner
On Saturday, September 08, 2018 at 12:56 PM, Sanctuary said:

I'm not great at recognising faces but on the whole I manage. However I do struggle when I see "faces out of context", e.g. if I see someone from work while out shopping or walking down the street. I struggle to make the connection and also worry about making a wrong recognition so if I think I've spotted someone I prefer to wait and see if they recognise me. By contrast I'm very good at remembering names and other biographical information, perhaps because I learn much better verbally rather than visually.

The car example is an interesting one. I'm struck by how many people (mostly men) can instantly recognise not just models but often editions of cars, sometimes from many years ago. I can only recognise cars with the most distinctive shapes such as Minis and Beetles. Clearly to some degree this is related to interest in cars but it can go deeper than that. Maybe for some people cars seem to have faces and they can recognise a car they've seen before just as the they would recognise a familiar person. Even if I studied pictures of cars continually I don't think I would ever come close to that proficiency. The same may apply to visually recognising other things such as types of plant or tree.

 

 

Prosopagnosia exists not just as one diagnosis. Full prosopagnosia means you can't recognise faces or distinguish photos. The prosopagnosia I suffer seems to get better or worse. I had it in reverse too where I thought someone I approached was someone I knew. A very strange look made me realise I had been mistaken. Also any significant change in hair style could cause me not to dare risk using a name of address. I may not know who someone is at all. 

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