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filamentous hyphae

What To Expect At The Diagnosis?

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filamentous hyphae

I'm 37 and I have yet to be diagnosed. During the late 70's and early 80's, Aspergers was still not largely understood. Many children went undiagnosed or were improperly diagnosed and suffered because of it. I believe I am one of those kids that "fell through the cracks" and didn't get the help that I so desperately needed.

 

However, through a lot of research, I'm 99.9999% certain that I have Aspergers and I want to understand how I work...so that I can relate to other people better and manage myself in public.

 

That said, it is much harder to diagnose an adult than it is a child or even a teen. Adults have created coping mechanisms to hide our peculiarities, although the fallout from so much hiding and cover-up is powerful. And embarrassing.

 

So, to the question: What should I expect at my interview with the psychologist? How should I prepare, if preparation is even needed? Since I have difficulties talking to someone I've never met before—and sometimes fall apart at the seems when trying to explain myself—I find it's easier to write up a bunch of notes and hand them all of my thoughts beforehand. Do you think this is worthwhile or a proper approach.

 

Basically, I'd just like to hear your experiences.

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Willow

I think writing things down is great - just don't only write the things that you think are relevant to Aspergers. You CANNOT go in there with the objective of getting diagnosed with AS because then you will subconsciously only give away certain information and it will become more unhelpful than helpful.

I had a hard time getting a diagnosis because they didn't seem to want to label me. But at one point, they were almost settled on Borderline Personality Disorder, so I researched it and basically told them what they wanted to hear. It just confused things really because it didn't fit with my history - ie. what I had been saying previously. So don't let your haste to get a diagnosis cloud the interview - just be yourself - even if that means being shy and barely saying anything - so long as you've written things down, they can at least go from that :)

Also, getting a diagnosis as an adult, more so than as a teen or a child, means little to no support :( I haven't really had a lot in the way of support or information. They sort of give you a detailed report (if you're lucky) and that's kind of it. Hopefully, like me, just having it written down on paper and in your official medical records will be the clarification you need to begin to understand yourself. Meeting people on forums, like this, helped me a lot. It made me feel like I made more sense because everyone was very similar to me. I felt less alone.

I hope I don't sound too negative - this is just my experience.

I wish you all the best with the interview though - just be YOU :D

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filamentous hyphae

Great advice, Willow. Thank you. And what you wrote didn't sound negative at all. Just truthful.

 

I'm thinking that I'm less in need of support and more in need of a "This is why I've been like this all these years!" And, hopefully, with that knowledge I'll be able to deal with things a little better.

 

I don't think I'll have any problems being "me."  :ph34r:

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Anxious

HI Rick,

I'm 46 and was diagnosed Aspergers 3 months ago in Sheffield...i have to go back there next week for a follow up appointment.

Like you i was 99.9999% sure i was Aspergers and because i forget to mention important facts i was worried that i would not get a diagnosis....not for diagnosis sake but so i could begin to understand myself. I was worried that if i wasn't Aspergers then what was going on with me.

 

When i got into the interveiw room i was made as relaxed as possible... the Dr. was extremely good and understanding..empathic almost and even though i felt the need to give him every single detail of my life not once did i get the feeling that he was bored or that i was wasting his time.

 

Essentially the Dr. went through the 50 questions Asperger test which you have probably already done online...i scored 46.

 

Is there anyone who knows you well able to be with you at appointment? If there is then take them with you.

Years ago i told a psychologist t i thought i had Aspergers and she dismissed it because i maintained eye contact (of course i don't actually know what to do with eye contact but if one dosen't use eye contact one gets that "are you listening to me? " response.

 

Just be you...and expect to get emmotional....diagnosis is a weight off one shoulder and then another weight on the other shoulder.

Good luck.

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filamentous hyphae

Hi Anxious,

 

What you've written is extremely helpful and I really do appreciate it. I have also wondered the same exact thing: "If I DON'T have Aspergers, what is going on with me? Am I really just a terrible person?"

 

I've been in contact with one specialist, and once I iron out the nightmare of insurance (one of those things I truly just can't wrap my head around), I will make an appointment. He already knows that I'm on my way in eventually. And he had actually requested meeting someone that knows me. So I think I have that covered.

 

In High School (I believe it's Secondary School for the UK residents), I was diagnosed with ADD. I wish things had gone much further earlier on. So that's just one more thing I have written down to speak with him about. The list has gotten quite massive.

 

I'll keep you all posted, but even if I don't have AS (which I think would be a surprise at this point), I would still like to stay on this site as you are all quite nice.

 

Thanks Anxious!

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Stressmonster
I have also wondered the same exact thing: "If I DON'T have Aspergers, what is going on with me? Am I really just a terrible person?"

 

This is normal to feel for most of us that has gotten a diagnosis at a later stage in life. Especially if one has realised that one kind of have ones own interest at heart most of the time in most situations. A quality not uncommon in any ASD (autism spectrum disorder). A trait which is closely linked to the whole "feeling alone in the world, no one understands me and the feeling of sticking out like a sore thumb". I believe it's to do with the difficulties in "seeing" that others have wants, needs, wishes, feelings etc. We all know that people do have this. (most of us at least) But we do not "see" it as good as people without these difficulties.

 

In short... We can come off kind of selfish to other people. A common trait in AS is talking about ones own needs and interests. It is not done on purpose. It's just one of those things that is like it is.

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filamentous hyphae
In short... We can come off kind of selfish to other people. A common trait in AS is talking about ones own needs and interests. It is not done on purpose. It's just one of those things that is like it is.

 

I've realized this, and it's more than a little embarrassing at times...once I've taken a step back and figured out what I've done.

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Stressmonster
I've realized this, and it's more than a little embarrassing at times...once I've taken a step back and figured out what I've done.

 

Yes i was a bit embarrassed at this myself when i first realized it. But after a while i just went "Meh! Screw it! I am the way i am. As long as i try to do something about what i can do something about then nevermind all the other stuff." It made me a happier person and more content with myself. I stopped trying so hard.

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Khasper

I went to my first appointment today, I was really nervous, but I always am when I do something different, but when I showed up I filled out all the paperwork, then we talked.

 

He asked me about my past, growing up how things around the family was, work, did I do anything outside of work.

 

Then we talked about how to improve things.

 

While it was a good time I will say that I was really exhausted after i left and I was not expecting that.

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Stressmonster
I went to my first appointment today, I was really nervous, but I always am when I do something different, but when I showed up I filled out all the paperwork, then we talked.

 

He asked me about my past, growing up how things around the family was, work, did I do anything outside of work.

 

Then we talked about how to improve things.

 

While it was a good time I will say that I was really exhausted after i left and I was not expecting that.

 

Apointments like these are exhausting. Filling out forms are exhausting.

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