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Sensory Overload In Coffee Shops Video

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Primeape

Yeah that happens to me too I tend to say who's that to situations like you describe 

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(deleted)

That is some sensory overload - thanks for sharing - and what a nightmare for poor Carly. That'll be me at the end of a stressful day

She is very Autistic and is also non-verbal - she communicates only via a computer because she says that it is too painful for her to use her voice.

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Eustace

That ... is ... perfect ... amazing ... exact .... precise, but none of the latter in actual description of the happenings when they are going on.

 

The video expresses exactly what it's like for me (without the artistic filters however), and the humming part ... that really is perfectly done; representing precisely why stims exist within the Asperger's individual.

 

THank you so very much for posting the video, I'm sure to keep it saved,

 

Eustace.

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Michael-D

She is very Autistic and is also non-verbal - she communicates only via a computer because she says that it is too painful for her to use her voice.

 

Since being given electro-convulsive therapy she great difficulty even using a computer to talk or write on Facebook.  I was very surprised that this treatment still exists, I believe it's banned in most countries.

She had written a book before the treatment.

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(deleted)

Since being given electro-convulsive therapy she great difficulty even using a computer to talk or write on Facebook.  I was very surprised that this treatment still exists, I believe it's banned in most countries.

She had written a book before the treatment.

Shame, poor thing :( . Did it damage her brain in some way?

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Nesf

It can get that bad for me too but not so often - I have good days and bad days. My biggest issue is noise; sounds are very loud for me too, just like in the video - cappuccino machines and banging cutlery are awful. Light doesn't usually affect me too much, but that can seem very bright, painful or distorting too if I'm having a particularly sensitive day, as it is for Carly in the video. Sometimes I'm ok, then someone will light a cigarette near me, or start talking loudly and wham, that tips the balance, everything suddenly gets intensified and unbearable.

 

The frustrating thing for Carly (or other nonverbal autistics) is that she can't easily communicate what she's experiencing - I can, I can ask the people I'm with to sit in a quiet corner of the cafe away from the sources of noise and the door, but for her it's not that simple.

Edited by Nesf

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MagicBard

I had to turn the volume down.  My sensitivity isn't that bad, but I do end up hearing all the little noises. To the point sometimes I feel like if i say something to the person I"m with they'll think i'm crazy.

 

In regards to Carly, I'd really like to know why they tried  ECT..

 

Copied from the National Institute of Mental Health website here in the US. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/brain-stimulation-therapies/brain-stimulation-therapies.shtml

 

ECT is usually considered only after a patient's illness has not improved after other treatment options, such as antidepressant medication or psychotherapy, are tried. It is most often used to treat severe, treatment-resistant depression, but occasionally it is used to treat other mental disorders, such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. It also may be used in life-threatening circumstances, such as when a patient is unable to move or respond to the outside world (e.g., catatonia), is suicidal, or is malnourished as a result of severe depression. One study, the Consortium for Research in ECT study, found an 86 percent remission rate for those with severe major depression.1 The same study found it to be effective in reducing chances of relapse when the patients underwent follow-up treatments

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(deleted)
In regards to Carly, I'd really like to know why they tried  ECT..

 

Copied from the National Institute of Mental Health website here in the US. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/brain-stimulation-therapies/brain-stimulation-therapies.shtml

 

ECT is usually considered only after a patient's illness has not improved after other treatment options, such as antidepressant medication or psychotherapy, are tried. It is most often used to treat severe, treatment-resistant depression, but occasionally it is used to treat other mental disorders, such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. It also may be used in life-threatening circumstances, such as when a patient is unable to move or respond to the outside world (e.g., catatonia), is suicidal, or is malnourished as a result of severe depression. One study, the Consortium for Research in ECT study, found an 86 percent remission rate for those with severe major depression.1 The same study found it to be effective in reducing chances of relapse when the patients underwent follow-up treatments

Well they had tried a lot of treatment options before that.

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