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Willow

Do You Ever Worry You Don't Have Aspergers?

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Toran
I find this very interesting Willow.  Having only known I have AS since September last year I'm relatively new to the whole idea of it.  I had, however, spoken about AS in relation to others and said that I didn't see it as a disability.

 

I do sometimes look at what traits are meant to be, and I do wonder if I fulfill the full criteria, but then I realise that I must have done to have been given the diagnosis.  When I did the test, I actually looked at the answers properly and esp at the ones my mum answered about me from when I was younger, and I couldn't argue with the results.

 

I don't worry that I have a diagnosis of AS and I certainly didn't think it'd cause me any problems.  Unfortunately someone has made it cause problems for me and that is rather disappointing, however, I'm hoping that this will be resolved imminently.  Once that has been sorted I will go back to being rather ambivilent about it.  I just see it as giving reasons for why I felt I was so strange and different all my life.  I can relate to the things mentioned re traits and it all makes sense now.

 

 

That's an interesting way to look at it and it certainly would make it make more sense for people from the outside looking in.  I agree, people learn coping mechanisms of all kinds as they go on in life, some are better than others at doing so, but it's all about learning.  If we continually learn from our experiences we are doing well, no matter how little or how much we learn throughout the process.

 

 

I just wonder, do you have a diagnosis or did you self diagnose?  Not that it really makes any difference I know, but it'd just be interesting to know.

 

 

I think, Sofi, that you're in a different position because you've known of your diagnosis for a long time, ie since you were 4, so you've pretty much grown up with it and known about it in your most formative years.  I agree that you wouldn't be you without your autism and it makes you who you are.  I'd agree that for everyone really... whilst sometimes we'd really prefer not to have a specific trait or whatever, we'd not be who we were without our autism, and I don't know that I'd want to actually be different, for the good points or the bad.

 

I think that self acceptance is the most important part with all of this... if we can be happy within ourselves, things can only begin to get better for us, even if slowly, very slowly, at times.

I think self exceptance is very important because whatever we have resisting it will only bring further problems into our lives. When you have done this then it really doesnt matter what others say or think because your happy with who you are and why your like it so as we get older from our childhood years its one of the first important lessons to learn.

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mary
I think self exceptance is very important because whatever we have resisting it will only bring further problems into our lives. When you have done this then it really doesnt matter what others say or think because your happy with who you are and why your like it so as we get older from our childhood years its one of the first important lessons to learn.

 

*edited by WillowHope

 

Unfortunately for me self acceptance isn't the only key factor in all this... I divulged information at work and it has not made things easier, in fact, it has caused many, many problems for me.

 

So, you saying that when we've accepted things ourselves it doesn't matter what others say or think, that's not exactly correct.

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Nesf

Yes, i do, because I had a private diagnosis after just over an hour with a Neuropsychiatrist who, although qualified to make a diagnosis, didn't conduct tests on me, but just asked my and my mum questions about my life. I wonder about the accuracy of this method of diagnosis.

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Toran
I don't really care anymore if a have or not.

Never really felt that a diagnosis would define who I am.

Your right it wont define you but will give you peace of mind as to whether you have it or not.

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Toran
Yes, i do, because I had a private diagnosis after just over an hour with a Neuropsychiatrist who, although qualified to make a diagnosis, didn't conduct tests on me, but just asked my and my mum questions about my life. I wonder about the accuracy of this method of diagnosis.

Ive never had the test so I dont know whats involved but it does seem that being autistic is a wide spectrum some tests could have been helpful.

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ztnt
I just wonder, do you have a diagnosis or did you self diagnose?  Not that it really makes any difference I know, but it'd just be interesting to know.

Is it relevant to the topic?

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Megsmum
Yes, i do, because I had a private diagnosis after just over an hour with a Neuropsychiatrist who, although qualified to make a diagnosis, didn't conduct tests on me, but just asked my and my mum questions about my life. I wonder about the accuracy of this method of diagnosis.

 

This is pretty much how Megan was diagnosed too. They didn't make the diagnosis on the first appointment because Megan was quite distressed at having to go for the assessment in the first place. They picked up on her reduced eye contact, how uncomfortable she was with shaking hands, constantly wringing her hands and playing with the cuffs of her jumper whenever they spoke to her etc, but mainly it was them asking questions about her childhood and development. We also had to fill in some questionaire type forms before the assessment and so did her school.

 

I suppose the whole interview process is a kind of test because they can see how you interperate a question, how long it takes you to process it, how you answer it, how well you cope with unfamiliar surroundings, sights, smells etc.....

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Annaflower
This is pretty much how Megan was diagnosed too. They didn't make the diagnosis on the first appointment because Megan was quite distressed at having to go for the assessment in the first place. They picked up on her reduced eye contact, how uncomfortable she was with shaking hands, constantly wringing her hands and playing with the cuffs of her jumper whenever they spoke to her etc, but mainly it was them asking questions about her childhood and development. We also had to fill in some questionaire type forms before the assessment and so did her school.

 

I suppose the whole interview process is a kind of test because they can see how you interperate a question, how long it takes you to process it, how you answer it, how well you cope with unfamiliar surroundings, sights, smells etc.....

Sound exactly like Bella's diagnostic process. I did feel a bit uncertain about it all. I couldn't understand how just an hour long session with Bella was enough. I realise that a lot of it comes from the questions my husband and I answered but I still felt like a more in depth assessment of B would have been useful, to find out what areas she struggles with and which traits are most present. That way we would have more information to work with.

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Nesf
I think you are right that you have learnt to manage your Aspergers and this has lead to your AS traits being less obvious. This does not mean that you no longer have it, just that you avoid the situations where it has been a problem in the past. As with Autism in general, Aspergers is a sliding scale of intensity. I have a mental image of a grid of 500 squares, each one representing a trait of AS. For each person they will tick a differnet ammount and combination of those traits within their character. For a diagnosis of AS they would need to tick between a third and two thirds of those squares. Below a third would be NT and above two thirds would be classic autism. for every person who is in the AS 'zone' they will have their own combination of traits. Some of them will be outwardly obvious and some may be more hidden. This means that each AS person cannot be the same as another and so comparisons person to person are misleading. I realise this is a very simplistic and non scientific representation, but it helps me to understand the intricacies of ASD.

Good post, and good analogy - you explain things perfectly! Also, I think the symptoms vary according to levels of stress, tiredness, etc, so on a good day you may appear more NT, and on other days less so.

 

This is pretty much how Megan was diagnosed too. They didn't make the diagnosis on the first appointment because Megan was quite distressed at having to go for the assessment in the first place. They picked up on her reduced eye contact, how uncomfortable she was with shaking hands, constantly wringing her hands and playing with the cuffs of her jumper whenever they spoke to her etc, but mainly it was them asking questions about her childhood and development. We also had to fill in some questionaire type forms before the assessment and so did her school.

 

I suppose the whole interview process is a kind of test because they can see how you interperate a question, how long it takes you to process it, how you answer it, how well you cope with unfamiliar surroundings, sights, smells etc.....

That's exaclty how I was during the assessment, too... you're right, they are professional people trained in detecting the signs, subtle or otherwise.

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Autistic4EVER

First off, I'd just like to say that this topic took me by surprise because I though that I was the only one who had worried about this. I sometimes fear that I lean more towards having Schizophrenia than Autism because I have found solitude and acceptance with Aspie/Autie communities. 

 

I'm practically the black sheep of the family and with society. So being told that I have had a misdiagnosis scares me because then where would I fit in ? It seems that my Dad is the only person in this world who truly accepts me because he feels that he might be an Aspie as well. I'd love for him to get a diagnoses one day.... 

 

But then there's the possibility that I'm really outgrowing Asperger's without losing all of my bad qualities that comes with it. I think since those few years that my Dad worked with me on out growing all of my negative traits, like using Autism as a crutch has helped me out a lot.  

 

I wouldn't trade my Aspie learning characteristics for anything in this world :D

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