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laracroft

Differences between Aspie-Women and Aspie-Men

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laracroft

I have read a lot about this and I have some personal experience. Yet, I would really love to see your opinion about that. Do you think there are differences on how autism is expressed in women and men? Do autistic women have any characteristics that in men appear differently and which are those? 

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Heather

Yes, I think many autistic traits are expressed differently in Aspie women than Aspie men.  

There is a list of traits of females with Asperger's Syndrome which I identified with a lot, it really helped me accept that my Asperger's diagnosis really did fit me.  I have discussed this in the past on this forum

I believe it's been one of the reasons that Asperger's Syndrome and autism were (still are, I think, but the gap is getting smaller I think) more diagnosed in boys than girls because initially, Hans Asperger noticed the traits in boys.  Girls have similar traits but are expressed differently. Also, the socialization of girls encourages different expression, as girls are more likely socialized to be quiet, staying out of the way and out of trouble, more likely to be quiet whereas boys are more likely to act out or be aggressive (in general) which ends up making them more visible that something is not "normal".  Girls are also more likely to mother/take care of other girls who are different than boys might to other boys who are different, so that can hide some of the social difficulty girls also experience. There are a lot of factors why girls with Autism/Asperger's express traits different than boys diagnosed with it, but I think the list I linked to above lists many of those traits that many females with Autism express very well.

 

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Cosmic
1 hour ago, squeeker said:

Yes, I think many autistic traits are expressed differently in Aspie women than Aspie men.  

There is a list of traits of females with Asperger's Syndrome which I identified with a lot, it really helped me accept that my Asperger's diagnosis really did fit me.  I have discussed this in the past on this forum

I believe it's been one of the reasons that Asperger's Syndrome and autism were (still are, I think, but the gap is getting smaller I think) more diagnosed in boys than girls because initially, Hans Asperger noticed the traits in boys.  Girls have similar traits but are expressed differently. Also, the socialization of girls encourages different expression, as girls are more likely socialized to be quiet, staying out of the way and out of trouble, more likely to be quiet whereas boys are more likely to act out or be aggressive (in general) which ends up making them more visible that something is not "normal".  Girls are also more likely to mother/take care of other girls who are different than boys might to other boys who are different, so that can hide some of the social difficulty girls also experience. There are a lot of factors why girls with Autism/Asperger's express traits different than boys diagnosed with it, but I think the list I linked to above lists many of those traits that many females with Autism express very well.

 

Thanks for the link. I think this list of traits is accurate (although every Aspie woman is different, but still). I identify with most of the traits, if not with all of them. The only thing is, I do not think I'm better at socializing than Aspie men. I find it extremely difficult, especially when I have to do the small talk thing with strangers (or even relatives). I should show this to my family. What's the source of this list?

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Heather

@Prism Yeah, I didn't mean to imply necessarily that females have it easier or worse than males with Asperger's/autism, just that it can appear that women with Asperger's/autism are better at social skills. I think it varies from person to person how difficult they find social situations, and as it is a very personal internal thing, it is hard to even think about comparing difficulties, as people will express their difficulties differently. I think most people with AS/autism will have difficulties in social situations and I didn't mean to make it seem less than that, just that the way girls are socialized when they are young makes their lack of social skills harder to recognize, because usually (especially in my case), they are quiet and stay out of the way because they don't want to break any rules.  

I am so glad you like the list of traits too and identify with most if not all of them.  It's a good idea to show it to family, to help them understand better.  The list was written by a "Rudy Simone." I'm not sure if she has Asperger's/autism or had worked with people/ladies with Asperger's and therefore has compiled a lot of information.  It might say so elsewhere on her website or I also (in the quick view of her full website) found she has a blog so you could learn more about her there too.

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PandaPrincess

I think Rudy Simone was self-diagnosed, but somewhere I heard that she said that she really wasn't affected by aspergers anymore because she was on a gluten-free diet, and she quit associating with it.  Recently, though, I heard that she is associating with it again, so I have no clue if she has it or not :huh:.  I don't know if she ever got a diagnosis or not.  

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PandaPrincess

She did interview women who were diagnosed though, and those accounts are in her book.  

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laracroft

Thank you all so much for your answers. I 've just had my baby so it was not possible to me to access the internet for a while. 

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Paul
On ‎10‎/‎17‎/‎2016 at 4:21 PM, laracroft said:

I 've just had my baby

Congratulations.

 

On ‎9‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 5:53 PM, PandaPrincess said:

wasn't affected by aspergers anymore because she was on a gluten-free diet

no comment:D

On ‎9‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 3:11 PM, squeeker said:

the way girls are socialized when they are young

I agree. Boys are expected to be boisterous (too much so and they get labeled ADHD, though) and girls are expected to be quieter.

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Eliza
On 9/25/2016 at 7:12 AM, laracroft said:

I have read a lot about this and I have some personal experience. Yet, I would really love to see your opinion about that. Do you think there are differences on how autism is expressed in women and men? Do autistic women have any characteristics that in men appear differently and which are those? 

 
 

Yes, although I believe we tend to think like men, there are several differences. Keep in mind that not everyone has every trait. There is a great traits list for adult female aspies on this blog: http://www.help4aspergers.com/pb/wp_a58d4f6a/wp_a58d4f6a.html

Edit: Sorry I hadn't read the responses first--looks like we all like the same list. :D

Edited by Eliza
Sorry about that

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Eliza
On 9/25/2016 at 3:53 PM, PandaPrincess said:

I think Rudy Simone was self-diagnosed, but somewhere I heard that she said that she really wasn't affected by aspergers anymore because she was on a gluten-free diet,

Good grief, if it were that simple we'd all be "cured" Honestly, I'm glad it's not. I love having Aspergers:D.

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