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Roxy

Jobs For Aspergers?

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Roxy
On 8/17/2017 at 7:35 PM, Going home said:

Start small.

Its easier to increase hours over time if things work out than reduce them when things don't work.
If in UK and worried about surviving without benefits I'd be looking 16 hrs or less.

I'm happy to do that, but will the job centre be happy for me doing only part-time? 

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MrGrey
On 8/9/2017 at 10:16 PM, blacktiger911 said:

i work at fedex as a delivery driver i drive a truck thats 33 feet long 10 ft hight and 8 feet wide and work 13 hour days monday through friday love it. i hate to say it but you might need to find a way out of your shell or find a midnight type job where you dont need to interact with people.

 

  I'm with blacktiger911 on this one.  True that we aspies have a hard time interacting with people.  But harder doesn't mean impossible.  I also work in the field driving a big truck around and knocking on people's doors.  Then I go inside the houses and fix stuff.  It was terrifying at first, but I can now say I'm pretty good at it.  Way better than my NT peers.  I consistently win over customer satisfaction rates and my clients constantly call my office back to say I was the nicest technician ever.

  After a lifetime of working graveyard shifts to avoid people, I never imagined I could ever develop those skills.  Granted, I don't approach social interactions like an NT would.  It takes quite a lot of neurons to logically decode small talk and decide what's appropriate to answer.  But is not impossible.      

  

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Gone away
2 hours ago, MrGrey said:

True that we aspies have a hard time interacting with people.  But harder doesn't mean impossible.  I also work in the field driving a big truck around and knocking on people's doors.  Then I go inside the houses and fix stuff.

I think thats the recipe for success .... just a variety of fleeting task focused contacts at work. Having to interact with the same people at work each day for extended periods with dead time is where things can go irretrievably wrong

 

On 22/08/2017 at 4:10 PM, Roxy said:

I'm happy to do that, but will the job centre be happy for me doing only part-time? 

Yes, why not? There is also a UK government scheme where you can formally apply for support around work if required. Can't think of the name at the moment ... maybe someone else knows.

 

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blacktiger911

also having a job to fall on is nice you can put on your "job mask" and do things you wouldent like normal. i work and im still looking into service dogs for my personal life.

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collectingrocks

Once upon a time I never thought I would end up working with other people. I wanted to be a train driver where I would be alone up front in the cab and not have to interact with people all day.

Funny how things change/turn out. I started working with people from a young age and have built up my confidence over time. Yes, I've have serious setbacks but working with people can actually be fun and rewarding at times. If I hadn't worked with people on a daily basis, I might never had known I had AS...

 

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Melanie222
On 8/7/2017 at 7:42 PM, Roxy said:

Willow said in one of her videos that they told her to get a job.. now I'm worried if the same happens to me, what I should do? and what jobs could I do? I'm good on computers, can type well, but I don't like being around other people..

Any suggestions?

If you are good at computers, you can become a web designer or web developer. This job allows to have a minimum contact with people and make a good career. Personally I chose this way. I've been learning web design and in order to practise I build websites by means of different construction group wordpress themes . Of course, I have to improve my skills and knowledge to be a professional, but I've already been in charge of my time. Also I can work at home and feel comfortable.

*Links removed by moderator due to excessive advertising*

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Aeolienne
On 9/1/2017 at 1:56 PM, Gone home said:

There is also a UK government scheme where you can formally apply for support around work if required. Can't think of the name at the moment ... maybe someone else knows.

 

Access to Work

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Ben

Farming - it's the only job I'm willing to do for someone else. After that, I work for myself. 

The world is too coperate and full of bullshit these days. As a herdsman,  I work to my own schedule and only deal with vets and contractors who are all on my side and speaking my language. 

I spend 80% of my life on my own. The other 20% is by choice.

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DC1346

Everyone on the autistic forum is different. If you want to work, I think you have to find something that dovetails with your interests. 

For a while, I had wide ranging interests because I was really into learning. Since I was something of a generalist, I became an elementary teacher. I did this for 17 years but ultimately burned out.  By this time my interests had become more specific. Since I've always had an interest in Culinary Arts, I went to culinary school, trained as a chef, and worked in the food service industry for a few years.

Although I largely enjoyed doing this, I didn't care for the long hours ... the double shifts and I especially hated working swing shifts where I'd be on the evening shift one day and then the opening shift the next day. Since restaurant shifts tend to run over, there were nights when I only got 4 hours of sleep and I really hated that. I also hated getting called into work because some bozo was a no call - no show. In 2005, I literally only had 4 days off for that entire year and I was pulling 84 hour work weeks.

One would think that I would have been pulling in all sorts of overtime pay but nooooooo ... I was ON CONTRACT and although my contract specified a minimum 50 hour work week, I found myself working 84 hours with no additional compensation.

A friend suggested that I go back into teaching as a Culinary Arts teacher. I did some checking and found that since I had three college degrees + lots of work experience that I'd garnered in a relatively short number of years, I was a shoo in for alternative certification. 

I returned to teaching as the chef instructor of a high school Culinary Arts program in 2007. I haven't looked back since.

I like my current location. I like my school. I like the support I receive from my building administration. I even like most of the students (most of the time). It took me many years. I was 47 when I finally found my dream job. 

One thing I like about teaching Culinary Arts is that I have absolute control over my classroom and kitchen. School law, district and school policy, the state instructional standards, my budget, and the tools and equipment I have in my kitchen define the parameters within which I can work with my students. 

Since I have a poor memory for faces, I've compensated by having an assigned seating chart. Within the kitchen, the students also have to sign into their respective stations. 

Kids who act up get a warning and if they continue being a problem, I just send them to the office and the building administrators take it from there. 

To be candid, MOST TEENAGERS like to eat and once kids get to know me and understand that the type of food and quality of product that we make depends upon their level of attention and degree of participation, most of them settle down. 

I recently had an executive chef and sous chef from one of the local casino resorts come by to visit. My Culinary I students (mostly 14-15 year old freshmen) were in the third day of a hands-on production test for the creation of a recipe (day 1), the production of a mother sauce (day 2), and the production of a sauce derivative with an accompanying entree. 

The kitchen was really bustling. Some kids made kebabs that were paired with a demiglace over scalloped potatoes. The presentation was exceptionally good for students who have only been in the kitchen for 6 months. Another group made a shepherd's pie. A third group made a Mexican inspired pasta with cheese sauce that was paired with fried onions, bell peppers, and chicken. The visiting chefs observed 8 different groups and each group produced a completely different product. 

The chefs were amazed at the level of skill they were seeing in such young teens. My immediate supervising administrator also popped by and was really floored over the quality and variety of dishes. All of the students passed. Most got A's and B's but a few got C's and D's. Even the students who did relatively poorly were happy with their overall performance and all of the students agreed that production tests were much more interesting than written tests. 

I was gratified to receive so much praise from my supervising administrator as well as the two visiting chefs. I am also thankful that I found my niche.

If you consider your interests and look for jobs that align with those interests, you have a good chance of find your niche as well.

I wish you all the best!

Chef Dave

 

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MrGrey

  I am probably gonna say something different to what most aspies want to hear.  When it comes to getting a job, we are NOT special.  Do you think the guy flipping hamburgers at the fast food likes what he does? Is it hamburger flipping his special interest?  Does he has some special hamburger flipping skill that makes him "good at what he does"? No, no and no.  People work because they have to earn a living.  Aspie or NT.  

  You get whatever job you can get and then keep looking for something better if possible.  But I'll tell you something:  Even if you happen to land a job doing something you really like doing, you will end up hating some aspects of the job.  Maybe it's the schedule, or you end up with a cranky boss. It's not gonna be all perfect.  It never is.  But you get it done, get paid and move on.

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