Jump to content
Myrtonos

Evidence that self-diagnosis doesn't really work

Recommended Posts

Myrtonos

Okay, I've heard that self-diagnosis is not recommended. Apparently people who self-diagnose may over-interpret their own behaviour and may think they meet the criteria for diagnosis that they actually don't.

However, some professional, I think it was Tony Atwood, said that we are only autistic when we leave the house. And to those who understand what this means; If this is the case, then self-diagnosis doesn't work. If it is so, it proves that you must have input from other people in the position to judge how autistic you are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Miss Chief

When people talk about self diagnosis what they usually mean is they suspect they have it and then they go see a professional to be assessed. I don't think anyone is saying that you can legally diagnose yourself, but you can have a suspicion that you have it and request assessment, or don't if you don't want a formal diagnosis, personally I never really sought out a diagnosis as I thought I was doing fine and it was only after I got diagnosed when I started researching it more and watching videos and visiting forums that I realised how much I had been  getting wrong.

I don't think you are only autistic when you leave the house... I think that is a weird thing to say, sure you might be more anxious when you leave the house but of course you are always autistic... saying otherwise would suggest it is something we chose/fake.

I would agree that people don't always understand psychological jargon and they may have a tendency to 'look for the traits' and then find them... that is why we have a formal assessment process, but as I have said elsewhere I knew I was on the spectrum from around age 14 and just never bothered following it up (assuming I didn't need to), none the less I was right since I do now have a formal diagnosis. Self-diagnosis is a first step on the road to formal diagnosis for people who haven't been diagnosed in childhood. 

I would absolutely agree that people should get formally diagnosed but a lot of the time you have to ask your doctor to refer you so that you can be assessed and this means you need to know or at least suspect you are on the spectrum.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr-David-Banner

Depends on level of severity. The Asperger children couldn't function in normal school. They were sent to a special facility. Such a pronounced level is almost easy to diagnose. Motor impairment, withdrawel, rocking and so on. So, when the autism is much less severe, then diagnosis is harder. The psychologist needs to have lots of information and be really specialised in that field. If it's self diagnosis that is fine by me so long as it's seriously investigated through reading and prolonged research. I learned just that Asperger accepted neurodiversity but his actual work was with fairly serious cases. Many non neurotypical adults may have gotten by at normal school without being sent for specialist help. Thus degree varies from severe, to less severe, to neurodiverse personality to fully neurotypical. Put simply severe AS is so disruptive it's easier to detect. Like severe alcoholism vs drink problem I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Butterfly88

I think a professional diagnosis is always better but isn't available to everyone for reasons such as insurance issues.  

  • Like 1
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr-David-Banner

The golden rule when Asperger Syndrome first came to be applied is this: If the symptoms cause difficulties in holding down a job or studying in class, or living life in general, there's a problem to be addressed. I know there may be exceptions to that rule, such as supportive employers, better self-coping mechanisms and so on. However, the thinking was if the A.S. was not disrupting someone's life, the situation is stable.

First thing to decide is, is there a serious problem? Or were there serious issues at school In the past? Nobody will know this better than the individual concerned. If indeed there were significant problems, then the next stage is to explore the cause.

I think it would be helpful at some point is A.S. sites included aids to self-diagnosis and then links to professional diagnosis. These latter I'm told are getting more scarce. Some people even told me they'd rather be diagnosed overseas in countries like the USA where there are more experts to consult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.