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Dr-David-Banner

What Is Autistic Psychopathy?

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Dr-David-Banner

Well, actually it has nothing to do with the modern understanding. It was used in German and simply means the path of the mind is autistic. Perception of the world is from within and tends to exclude inclusion of other people. To understand it you need to realise abstract thinking is the root of the condition and is so extreme simple daily realities become removed and remote. Thus, instinctive, social norms are sort of eclipsed and the autist has to intellectualise what for others is instinctive. With autistic psychopathy comes physical clumsiness, poor gait, poor muscle tone, poor co-ordination. And learning disability at school because we can't process information in groups. Sensitivity to foods and fabrics on skin is evident in childhood. Voice is either monotone or maybe loud and conversation is one sided or maybe forced on others but with poor personal connection. Empathy is said to range between extremes of high or low. Either you feel too much emotion or not at all. Intellect is said to vary and also the severity of the condition. One interesting detail is you can't just choose the positive attributes and do away with the bad ones. The positive aspects exist as opposite poles to the negative. Thus, you can't get 12 positive volts to a bulb unless there is a negative. Lesser known symptoms are swearing or strong bonds to objects such as dolls. Very often sexual performance problems or low drive. Sensitivity to noise or rustles. For me though the core of autistic psychopathy is autism in the sense of learning delay and withdrawel. Normal people learn about the world collectively by sharing experiences with others. With A P you process everything inwardly. A bit like The Fool On The Hill.

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Sofi

Isn't what you have described just Autism? It doesn't need to be called Autistic Psychopathy. I think that's a very old fashioned way to describing Autism. Psychopathy is a whole separate condition. 

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Dr-David-Banner

Funnily enough, the modern definition of psychopath is what you'd find in a Columbo episode. Someone with a great job and excellent social skills but possibly insane and placing no value on life. However, the term "autistic psychopath", as used by Asperger just means the mind is wired inwardly. I've heard "autistic psychopathy" used in the past and thought it sounded a bit sinister. Language changes though. Other than that, I think the actual papers on autistic psychopathy are excellent and very thorough. Now that Asperger Syndrome has been removed altogether, my aim is to publish the whole autistic psychopathy diagnosis, just as it was. 

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Dr-David-Banner

How often do you hear: "People with A.S. lack empathy." A great example how confusion and stereotyping spreads. What Asperger spelled out is autistic psychopaths either over empathise or under empathise. In the movie on Hans Christian Anderson his extreme empathy was shown in scenes where he cries at the opera and so on. So really we need to state that people with A.P. show extremes of empathy. By simply repeating the mantra that they "lack empathy" we just add to ever more misunderstanding. Another common misconception: People with A.P. simply collect large amounts of information on favourite topics such as "train spotting" but show no "deep understanding" of the subject. And yet Asperger distinguishes between 2 groups of autistic psychopaths. (1) Collectors of facts, figures and numbers. (2) Actual scientists or chemists or anatomists. The latter Asperger places in the minority. Yet for ages psychologists have adhered to the train spotting stereotype. At the moment I am attempting to clarify all Asperger discovered through quotes of his work. My hope is to build a solid framework to clearly outline what we do know before jumping ahead and aimlessly quoting stereotypes (or old wives tails). I confess much of it has had me confused just the same. Above all we need to define what autism actually is. I don't want to knock Baron Cohen but his famous test was too generalised and loose to be effective. If switchboards were jammed by people who passed the test with flying colours, that is a problem. For example, if you ask: Do you prefer to go out with friends or stay home and read?, any die-hard book worm will tip the scales closer to autism. So maybe better: Does being in the company of other people make you tense and wish to  retreat by yourself? Not perfect but detail helps. Some then may respond, "I just prefer to read as I love a good book."

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Dr-David-Banner

Oops! Old wives tales and not "tails". 

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Dr-David-Banner

Set myself a goal some weeks back to try and publish concrete facts on Asperger's autistic psychopathy. My view is psychology is way behind hard sciences like electronics or maths and is closer to politics or history (where opinion creates trends of thought). Whereas in hard sciences the initial rules are accepted by all and we move on. You cannot do this with autism if nobody agrees and actually nails down the definitions. Sure the knowledge is there to be tapped but it's spread out and disorganised or renamed or re-interpreted. Plus in my view the original studies done by Asperger are accurate enough to stand as they are and not be airbrushed. This goes back to the philosopher Socrates who stated you can't teach a subject without first defining what it is. 

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Dr-David-Banner

I am working on the A.P.T. test but it is being done in Russian. This may come out a bit strange in English but if I run through what I have so far Google Translate seems to wpork not too bad.

With this test I am not sure if I will try to suggest pointers to any concrete indication of diagnosis. Besides, no test can do that anyway. The test at the moment is intended to simply help people consider what does and what does not apply to them. It is nowhere near finished yet: Plus I'm not a psychologist and am just doing my best to clarify Aspergers writings.

(1)У меня возникли проблемы в связи с учебой когда учился в школе. (a) правда (b) неправда
(1)I had problems with studying when I was in school. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(2) В школе а также с детства я привык мечтать или смотреть через окно и мне было трудно сосредоточиться на уроке. (a) правда (b) неправда
(2) At school and also from childhood, I used to dream or look through the window and it was hard for me to concentrate on the lesson. (a) the truth (b) is not true

3) Учители заметили что у меня была моторная неловкость и мне совсем не хотелось участвовать в спортивных играх. (a) правда (b) неправда
3) The teachers noticed that I had a motor awkwardness and I did not want to participate in sports games at all. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(4) С ранних лет мне не получается так легко бросать и ловить мяч. (a) правда (b) неправда
4) From early years, I can not so easily throw and catch the ball. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(5) В детстве часто играл в одиночестве и сейчас - как взрослый - часто замыкаюсь в себе. (a) правда (b) неправда
5) When I was a child, I often played alone, and now, as an adult, I often shut myself up. (a) the truth (b) is not true

6) В школе у меня почерк был как курица лапой. (a) правда (b) неправда
6) At school my handwriting was like a chicken paw. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(7) В школе я не очень хорошо ладил с другими детьми и иогда надо мной издевались и смеялись. (a) правда (b) неправдан7) At school I did not get along very well with other children and sometimes laughed at me. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(8) В детстве я часто устраивал истерики и сейчас - как взрослый - я привык прийти в ярость или испытываю сенсорную перегрузку. (a) правда (b) неправда
(8) As a child, I often made hysterics and now - as an adult - I'm used to getting furious or experiencing sensory overload. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(9) Когда был мальчиком я не выносил грубого прикосновения новой рубашки, заштопанных штан или одеял. (a) правда (b) неправда
(9) When I was a boy, I could not bear the rough touch of a new shirt, mended pots or blankets. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(10) Я часто нахожу сходство отношений между предметами или идеями. (a) правда (b) неправда
10) I often find a similarity in the relationship between objects or ideas. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(11) Часто неправильно интерпретирую иносказательные выражения и буквально толкую слова и фразы. (a) правда (b) неправда(11)
Often I misinterpret allegorical expressions and literally interpret words and phrases. (a) the truth (b) is not tru

(12) У меня бывает монотонная или невыразительная речь. (a) правда (b) неправда
 (12) I have a monotone or inexpressive speech. (a) the truth (b) is not true

(13) У меня отсутствуют жестикуляция и выражения лица. (a) правда (b) неправда

(13) I do not have gesticulations and facial expressions. (a) the truth (b) is not true

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Dr-David-Banner

Not sure why and how GT came up with the "pots" business. The end bit is simply to answer yes it applies or no it does not.

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Dr-David-Banner

Point here raised by a Russian psychologist and expert on Aspergers. This is the first time I ever heard anyone mention this but I have asked the same question often.

"Some will argue that yes. In addition, many specialists now notice that the young population (approximately at the age of 5 to 25) is becoming more and more like autistic people due to their obsession with digital devices (computer, iPhone, iPad). These young people literally (a) are in a changed reality (that is, digital, and do not accumulate real life experience), (b) spend an excessive amount of time on their "special interest" and (c) little involved in social interaction - all these traits can be attributed to autistic. So, the question arises: is autism on the rise, or is it just an increasing number of normal people behaving authenically (in its highly functional version)?"

I do not agree that what we see today with excessive I.T. use and the staying in at home phenomenon (the Japanese call Hikikomori) is at all the same as what Asperger detected and studied in Austria. That is, autistic psychopathy. I also think it's a mistake to relate excessive computer use (games and so on) to the "special interests" Asperger described. Sure, I totally agree we are seeing educational delay and poor social interaction caused by the modern digital lifestyle but I meet a lot of such people daily. It does not come across to me as the same as Asperger's.

On my website I will be doing my level best to clarify how autistic psychopathy differs from the modern "digital addiction syndrome" for want of a better term.

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Dr-David-Banner

I had the idea of doing a book. For the time being it will be a big article for my website. The appeal will be that the whole thing is being done for Russian speakers at the current time. Given I have lived right through the period of zero diagnosis (seventies, eighties)up to the rise and fall of the "Aspie Neurodiversity Movement", I guess I have much to say about how it all "rolled out". Maybe it's a bit like being Forest Gump in a world of change.

The question I guess I will be asking is was the Aspie Social Movement a bad trip? Did it do more good by raising awareness or did it trivialise the serious research carried out in the 1930s.

Possibly my article will lay some blame on Lorna Wing who seemed to me to try to reinterpret the work of Asperger and create her own diagnosis.

Book starts: Подъём и падение общественного движения "Аспи".  
Как может быть что австрийский педиатр и психиатр Ганс Аспергер превратился в лидера глобального, хаотического движения?

The Rise And Fall of the social Aspie Movement. How could an Austrian psycholologist have become the leader of a global movement?

Actually, in Russia this is not likely to go down all that well. I noticed there is a very close "redoing" of the western experience so that I see the T shirts and coolness of the phenomenon becoming popular over there.

T2.png

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