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Autism in children / autism in adults

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Dr-David-Banner

Also to avoid it being too "heavy" I will be adding the odd movie post review.

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Dr-David-Banner
On Wednesday, January 09, 2019 at 9:46 AM, Sanctuary said:

In a sense we are all acting in social situations and have the job of conveying the "appropriate" emotion or response. In some cases this means simulating feelings we do not have. I must stress this is not the same as lying or hypocrisy although those are also examples of simulation. Often we simulate an emotion or response in order to help or support others, or to fit in with a required mood. For example a person may have all sorts of personal problems on their mind but at work he or she is expected to put them aside and be positive with customers, other staff, etc. The same applies if an unhappy person goes to a party or some other kind of upbeat event. Sometimes it's a case of fitting-in with a more downbeat mood even when the person feels indifferent or even happy. Social "acting" though is also involved in convincing others of our true feelings and intentions, e.g. a person who is telling the truth has to convince others of that fact and that is not always easy. One of the problems for those on the autistic spectrum can be that they can struggle to convey their true feelings and are therefore unfairly seen as "lacking interest", "being insincere", "being cold" and so on.

We can certainly study how these emotions and behaviours are successfully or unsuccessfully acted out. To some degree we can improve or "make more appropriate" how we project ourselves but it is not an easy task as our personae have developed over decades and are hard to modify. Another issue - and certainly a problem for those with ASD - is reputation. If a person develops a negative reputation often even when they do all the right things they are still viewed negatively while those with positive reputations often seem to be able to do what they like and still be well-regarded. 

It strikes me pretty much all research on autism missed one important point. This was something only Nichola Tesla addressed and he was an electrical scientist, not a psychiatrist. As Tesla stated we are all effectively just biological robots. There is this concept of "normality = functionality". We are expected to labour collectively and interact or share in collective ventures. Anyone who doesn't follow this program is assumed to be not normal. Tesla by the way stated anti-social behaviour is trait of intelligence. Asperger stated there needs to be a balance between excessive individualism and willingness to accept ideas from others. If the goal is mainly not to lose popularity and to "fit in" we run the risk of mere conformity. Lately it really struck me the degree of automation in social behaviour. People don't realise you can succeed on your own. You can learn things by yourself. You need time to think and you need the time alone to develop this ability. Yet people are rushing around doing this and doing that but so often not solving genuine problems. I think I now understand what John Lennon had in mind when he wrote Nowhere Man. I agree autism is a defect and a disorder but inevitably  it will be a reaction to this very chaotic environment. The irony is if I want to become socialised and balanced how can this be done in such a automated, robotic environment? This is why I sometimes reacted negatively to all these "like" and "reputation" buttons on social media. This is really a concept applied initially in.school (stars and points), embodied at work (employee of the month) and on social media most people want to be told what they prefer to hear. I found this on special interest sites and, of course, when I taught English abroad. 

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Dr-David-Banner

Sanctuary, this may be of interest to you:

"It will be seen that the description of Asperger's syndrome is substantially similar to the picture in some relatively intelligent individuals with a diagnosis of infantile autism.Indeed, Asperger originally believed that people with his syndrome were of high intelligence. What stands out as different from infantile autism is the superficially normal early language development. The term, Asperger's syndrome, therefore proposes that there are a group of individuals who have a disorder of social development similar to that found in infantile autism, but with a pattern of early language development that appears grossly normal; at least as regards the milestones that are usually recorded. More able autistic individuals who develop language move from no language at age 3 to quite extensive use of speech which, as in Asperger's syndrome, is used in a grammatical but one sided and literal fashion. The suggestion is that there are parallels in function in the areas of social interaction, communication, and obsessional interests and activities. Those of low ability, or those of higher ability at an earlier stage of development show aloofness, no language, and simple repetitive activities. More able individuals, particularly at a later stage of development, display a more elaborate picture of social ineptness, circumscribed interests, and concrete egocentric use of language. This analysis could be seen to reinforce the notion that Asperger's syndrome is no more than high functioning autism. There are individuals, however, with autistic social development who have appreciably abnormal early language development including a significant delay in comprehension of speech, who subsequently attain to a high functioning picture. There are others, also high functioning, who do not have a history of abnormal early language development, at least in a gross sense.  Considerable progress has been made in trying to understand the nature of the psychological processes which are dysfunctional in childhood autism. Two main views are, on the one hand that there is a deficit in the innate ability to interact emotionally with others, and on the other an impairment in the cognitive process of metarepresentation."

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