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Willow

Asperger Symptoms in Adult Males

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Willow

I'm looking for a list of symptoms/traits that are more or less exclusive to adult males with an ASD, separate from the general list of symptoms for anyone with an ASD. If possible, can only the male members reply with symptoms to add to the list please, as I would prefer first hand accounts, and not observations. These can possibly be true for some females on the spectrum but I'm more looking for things that would differ from an NT male, where an NT female may reasonably experience these. This list is symptoms my brother has that I don't, that I cross referenced online and found other males to list as symptoms also.

  • trouble having positive feelings about self
  • assumes they aren't good looking so don't care about personal appearance
  • not good at accepting or believing praise or positive comments about self
  • difficulty remembering ever feeling carefree
  • prone to mood swings
  • verbally aggressive at times, if not prompted about mood and tone
  • difficulties with intimacy

@Ben @Asgardian @StarlessEclipse @StormCrow @Max000 @Peridot @Harrow - if any of you would be willing to help?

Additional list from research so far:

  • tend to lead fairly solitary lives
  • reluctant to seek support
  • Poor short term memory and recall
  • Easily upset and discouraged by rejections from the opposite sex (or the gender of romantic preference)
  • Easily manipulated by the opposite sex (or the gender of romantic preference)
  • Noticeable differences in interests compared to similarly aged same sex counterparts
  • Struggles to accept lack of talent in an area of interest

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RiRi

I nominate @Sanctuary as well because I'm sure he would give a great response. He seems very knowledgeable. Also, @Myrtonos

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Harrow

This is really difficult for me to answer because I only know my symptoms not if they are common only in males or not only. 

But if I compare to your brother, I do have trouble having positive feelings about myself. I am also terrible at accepting comments apparently I shake my head when people give me good comments. Being carefree that is an interesting one because I don't know if I was ever carefree or not, I never remember feeling carefree but that could just be personal to my own life and not a symptom, or maybe it is, I could not say. I do not think I get mood swings I used to when I was younger but have not in years, nor am I ever verbally aggressive I do not think.

And I do not have a problem been intimate but again compared to what, how can I know.

 

I will think about this in more detail but I may need a day or two to respond again. But I hope I am at least a little bit helpful now.

 

 

 

 

 

  

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Willow

@Harrow thank you for your reply so far :) I realise it's a difficult one to answer, I suppose looking at a list of supposed female only symptoms, cross referencing them with the usual symptoms, and then anything you're left with may be a male only symptom. Which I realise is a lot of work, but I was intending on doing that work myself once I had a list of symptoms which males thought were a result of ASD.

I'm just trying to do some research and gather a comprehensive list of symptoms that most cases will experience, as well as female and male typical symptoms, since there's not a huge amount of info about; how symptoms present in adults, symptoms in males or indeed a single resource that complies all the aforementioned! 

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Harrow

@Willow do not worry I have planned on doing that for you. I just need a day or two. :) 

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Willow
15 minutes ago, Harrow said:

@Willow do not worry I have planned on doing that for you. I just need a day or two. :) 

Thank you :) There's no rush!

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Sanctuary
9 hours ago, RiRi said:

I nominate @Sanctuary as well because I'm sure he would give a great response. He seems very knowledgeable. Also, @Myrtonos

Thanks for your nomination RiRi. There are wide variations in how ASD manifests itself among males just as it does among females and I'm going to generalise and speculate to some degree. I think the variations where they occur are more a reflection of how males and females are socialised rather than autism affecting males differently to females per se. I think the characteristics of autism are often more evident in adult males. It's often suggested that females with ASD are more likely to try to mimic the behaviour patterns of neurotypical females and this can lead to their ASD being less evident in public. Males seem less likely to do this and more likely to follow a clearly autistic path. In our societies females are encouraged more from a young age to be sociable and generally develop links with friends and family; there is less of this pressure generally on males. In adulthood I feel that autistic males are much more likely than autistic females to lead fairly solitary lifestyles. this solitary lifestyle may also lead to autistic characteristics becoming intensified as social contact tends to "normalise" behaviour (I'm not saying "normalising" is necessarily positive). Autistic men may also be much less likely to discuss their situation or seek support. This is more to do with males being encouraged to be "strong" and "self-reliant". This can be problematic as they may struggle to deal with difficulties in their lives and could result in autistic men being at more risk of breakdown of some kind. They could (and this is largely conjecture) be more at risk of aggressive words or behaviour either directed at others or at themselves but I should stress this is more about how males are socialised in general than a reflection of autism.

Among adults of both sexes there are probably still high levels of non-diagnosis. Among women this is likely to be due to their efforts at "masking" autism but among men it may be more to do with their reluctance to seek support, especially engaging with health services. Other aspects of autism may be gender-patterned in adult life such as specialised interests which may build on more broadly male interests, e.g. in science, technology and sport.

 

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Nesf

Good topic @Willow. There are now a few sites highlighting female traits, but not so many, if any, to deal with traits that might be more specific or common to males.

Your list of your brother's traits sounds a lot like me... but I'm female. I suspect that there is a lot of overlap, and in the end, individuals are individuals.

I agree with @Sanctuary's points about females being brought up or socialised in a different way to males, and how that might interplay with autistic traits. I'm female, but was brought up by my parents in a very gender-neutral way, I'm also very much a tomboy without a sense of femininity, which might also influence which traits I have.

Edited by Nesf

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Dr-David-Banner
14 hours ago, Willow said:

@Harrow thank you for your reply so far :) I realise it's a difficult one to answer, I suppose looking at a list of supposed female only symptoms, cross referencing them with the usual symptoms, and then anything you're left with may be a male only symptom. Which I realise is a lot of work, but I was intending on doing that work myself once I had a list of symptoms which males thought were a result of ASD.

I'm just trying to do some research and gather a comprehensive list of symptoms that most cases will experience, as well as female and male typical symptoms, since there's not a huge amount of info about; how symptoms present in adults, symptoms in males or indeed a single resource that complies all the aforementioned! 

Best bet by far is the source material. That is Dr Asperger's essays. Somewhere they should be online translated from German. The case histories of about five males are included and you can skip the intro and read the sections on intellect, socialization, hereditary factors and so on. Should come under autistic psychopathy in childhood. Also you have Lorna Wing's essays but ultimately she used Asperger as her main source. It's like one of my lecturers used to.say - source material is always a plus.

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Willow
5 hours ago, Sanctuary said:

Thanks for your nomination RiRi. There are wide variations in how ASD manifests itself among males just as it does among females and I'm going to generalise and speculate to some degree. I think the variations where they occur are more a reflection of how males and females are socialised rather than autism affecting males differently to females per se. I think the characteristics of autism are often more evident in adult males. It's often suggested that females with ASD are more likely to try to mimic the behaviour patterns of neurotypical females and this can lead to their ASD being less evident in public. Males seem less likely to do this and more likely to follow a clearly autistic path. In our societies females are encouraged more from a young age to be sociable and generally develop links with friends and family; there is less of this pressure generally on males. In adulthood I feel that autistic males are much more likely than autistic females to lead fairly solitary lifestyles. this solitary lifestyle may also lead to autistic characteristics becoming intensified as social contact tends to "normalise" behaviour (I'm not saying "normalising" is necessarily positive). Autistic men may also be much less likely to discuss their situation or seek support. This is more to do with males being encouraged to be "strong" and "self-reliant". This can be problematic as they may struggle to deal with difficulties in their lives and could result in autistic men being at more risk of breakdown of some kind. They could (and this is largely conjecture) be more at risk of aggressive words or behaviour either directed at others or at themselves but I should stress this is more about how males are socialised in general than a reflection of autism.

Among adults of both sexes there are probably still high levels of non-diagnosis. Among women this is likely to be due to their efforts at "masking" autism but among men it may be more to do with their reluctance to seek support, especially engaging with health services. Other aspects of autism may be gender-patterned in adult life such as specialised interests which may build on more broadly male interests, e.g. in science, technology and sport.

 

Thanks for your reply. I think I will add 'tends to lead a fairly solitary life' and 'reluctance to seek support' to the list, and see how it fairs against other people's accounts.

3 hours ago, Nesf said:

Good topic @Willow. There are now a few sites highlighting female traits, but not so many, if any, to deal with traits that might be more specific or common to males.

Your list of your brother's traits sounds a lot like me... but I'm female. I suspect that there is a lot of overlap, and in the end, individuals are individuals.

I agree with @Sanctuary's points about females being brought up or socialised in a different way to males, and how that might interplay with autistic traits. I'm female, but was brought up by my parents in a very gender-neutral way, I'm also very much a tomboy without a sense of femininity, which might also influence which traits I have.

Thanks Nesf. I do get tired to seeing little to no support for males - whether it be simple lists of traits that affect them, or more in depth information. I knew there was always going to be a lot of overlap, but I hope that the more research I do the more I can section traits off to be more likely to affect either only males or females.

23 minutes ago, Dr-David-Banner said:

Best bet by far is the source material. That is Dr Asperger's essays. Somewhere they should be online translated from German. The case histories of about five males are included and you can skip the intro and read the sections on intellect, socialization, hereditary factors and so on. Should come under autistic psychopathy in childhood. Also you have Lorna Wing's essays but ultimately she used Asperger as her main source. It's like one of my lecturers used to.say - source material is always a plus.

I will look into those essays, thank you. But a lot of source material tends to be quite dated, and we can't look at how the modern world affects these symptoms and traits in males and/or females. So I wanted to conduct my own research, creating new source material.

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