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RiRi

Brain Decline

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RiRi

This might be for members 30+ or around that age. What does it feel like when your brain starts to decline? Do you feel any different than what you've usually felt?

And because the ability to learn something new does decline with age, did you feel the difference between when it was easier to learn something? If so, how?

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Nesf

I feel like my brain has declined recently due to the cancer treatment I had, the chemotherapy and the hormone therapy. Basically the hormone therapy shuts down estrogen production, and a blocker stops the body being able to use estrogen. This meant that I went into premature menopause, and that really, really sucks (but still rather that than risk the cancer returning). One of the side effects of menopause is a decline in cognitive function: I get brain fog and sometimes find it hard to concentrate and hard to remember things. Also, another two things that can cause this are chemotherapy and PTSD. When I spoke to my doctor about it, she said that it could be due to any one of these things, or a combination, and it can take up to three years for the 'chemobrain' to wear off. I feel like I lost 20 or so IQ points. I used to have a really good long term memory, but I feel that this is in decline, My mind is no longer as sharp as I used to be. I feel a great sense of loss. I don't know about learning new things - I did learn how to do something new recently without difficulty, I think that a person can retain this abiltiy into old age if they keep their mind active.

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Myrtonos

@Nesf I have wondered for some time if anyone, even before you were diagnosed with any cancer, ever thought you to not have enough estrogen or too much testosterone because of how man-like you apparently are.

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Nesf
6 hours ago, Myrtonos said:

@Nesf I have wondered for some time if anyone, even before you were diagnosed with any cancer, ever thought you to not have enough estrogen or too much testosterone because of how man-like you apparently are.

Physically I'm not man-like, only in many of my preferences (not sexual, I am hererosexual) and the way I think. It might have more to do with my upbringing that hormones. I was not gender-socialised by my parents, by that I mean, they didn't try to force a gender role on me, let me choose my toys and activities, wear the clothes I wanted and didn't try to make me into something that I wasn't.

Actually, this question should go into a different, or a new thread, as it's not really related to brain decline.

Edited by Nesf

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StarlessEclipse

I'm only 21, but due to the amount of sleep deprivation I've suffered as a result of various mental health problems, I'm definitely not as sharp as I once was. It's especially noticeable when I'm reading a book, watching a film, thinking about politics, etc. in that I sometimes find it very difficult to intuit basic concepts. You might think that my long-winded essay-type posts prove that I'm of perfectly sound mind, but writing those sorts of things is sometimes necessary for me just to grasp simple concepts that would have gone into my brain effortlessly a few years ago.

The Internet doesn't help. The overwhelming pervasiveness of endlessly repeated lies and distortions is almost like a new form of gaslighting that requires no direct interaction.

Edited by StarlessEclipse

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Dr-David-Banner
21 minutes ago, StarlessEclipse said:

I'm only 21, but due to the amount of sleep deprivation I've suffered as a result of various mental health problems, I'm definitely not as sharp as I once was. It's especially noticeable when I'm reading a book, watching a film, thinking about politics, etc. in that I sometimes find it very difficult to intuit basic concepts. You might think that my long-winded essay-type posts prove that I'm of perfectly sound mind, but writing those sorts of things is sometimes necessary for me just to grasp simple concepts that would have gone into my brain effortlessly a few years ago.

The Internet doesn't help. The overwhelming pervasiveness of endlessly repeated lies and distortions is almost like a new form of gaslighting that requires no direct interaction.

"The Internet doesn't help. The overwhelming pervasiveness of endlessly repeated lies and distortions is almost like a new form of gaslighting that requires no direct interaction."

I have pretty good evidence I think to safely conclude the internet is now connected with brain decline (to put it in terms related to the thread). I am no longer alone in this view as it seems the Government has been presented with evidence to suggest children are at risk. Here what we refer to is the overwhelming use of the net at the level you used to see with junk T.V. I mean, I can't help but notice that hardly ever is it used educationally or in ways that will develop your intellectual or artistic ability. Even worse, it's used these days as a crutch by companies or firms that prefer to answer the phone but simply set up some site with automated numbers.

This is not to say the net isn't a good thing. Used wisely, it is a great step forwards. The snag is though that the temptation to use it as chewing gum for the brain seems to be over-riding the potential to use it more positively. I think too it all started with cable TV because, before cable, we only had 4 TV stations. Of those stations, the quality of TV was pretty good. Even the comedy shows were witty. Junk TV as it existed was still at least witty. Then came cable and all the real junk chat shows and trivial gossip. Finally the internet which seemed to be predominantly social based. I mean social media is the essence of socialization.

I dropped regular TV years ago due to too much negativity and instead simply choose a dvd disk - more often than not older programs or seventies or eighties TV series or films. I never regretted the decision to drop regular TV. Social media I use proportionally but hardly all the time.

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Sanctuary

Younger people are probably quicker at learning skills - the brain is generally more adaptable at younger ages. However experience and attitude / motivation can more than compensate for this. A good example is driving. Teenagers tend to pass their driving test after fewer lessons than older learners but are then more accident-prone and generally less effective drivers because they don't have the same experience of the road and are more likely to take risks or overestimate their abilities. There will be times at whatever age we feel our learning abilities are not so sharp and we have to accept this and not to be hard on ourselves. We can also try to compensate through experience and knowing our limitations which younger, apparently quicker learners may be less able to do.

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