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Cultural slang or idoms you like or dislike?

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Nesf

I don't like the terms of endearment either - it feels too intimate.

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RiRi
On 3/12/2019 at 2:31 AM, Sanctuary said:

In the UK - mainly among those of middle-age or over - it's common to hear people address others as "love", e.g. "are you alright, love?" - this makes no sense as there isn't a romantic relationship between them or often any relationship as they may well be strangers. Often these terms are used unthinkingly out of habit but I would rather we used words that had meaning and feeling behind them. 

It's the same in the US. They say: sweetie, darling, honey, etc. I've seen this behavior in elder homes. I feel like I couldn't do this even if I had a deeper connection to these elder people whom are not part of my family. It would just be weird. I could call them by their nickname if they have one but honey, darling, etc. I feel is too awkward. I don't even refer to my family members by the Spanish endearments. I searched this up "endearment" which I didn't know what it was and it looks like they have it in Spanish too but it seems more subtle and less awkward feeling to me than being called "honey" by a stranger.

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RiRi

I don't like the Southern American idiom "Bless your heart" because I've heard some people use it as an insult. So a person can say something stupid without meaning to and then the Southern American can say, "Bless your heart" and instead of it being positive they could low key/high key be trying to insult that person. Thankfully, I don't live in the southern states and not many people, if any, would be able to tell me this. Also, thinking about it, the image of a priest spraying holy water on a heart is weird. lol That person would have to be dead for this to happen. Or if they can get a priest to bless the heart before putting it inside in a heart transplant operation. So basically the idiom doesn't make sense because to bless the heart, they would need the heart outside of the body and that can't happen if the person is still alive. 

Edited by RiRi

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Sanctuary

It's certainly true that all the terms and expression we've mentioned can be used ironically (or sarcastically) or humorously and I think in these contexts they can be more effective. When they are used "straight" they are not necessarily terms of endearment as they are often delivered without any sense of positive feeling - they are just used unthinkingly. Sometimes they are used when a person doesn't know someone else's name but to me they still feel pointless. In such contexts the person could be called "Sir" or "Madam" but I suppose this seems too formal. Even so there seems to be no need to use these terms except perhaps between friends, partners and family members who genuinely have those warm feelings.

On a related point I dislike cases where a person knows someone else's name (or should know it) but doesn't use it. To me it's good manners to use someone's name - a basic way of reaching out to another person and showing they are not anonymous. Of course they should also then be called by the name they prefer,  i.e. first name, title and surname or even by a nickname. It can certainly be disrespectful to call someone by just their surname, a nickname if they don't want this or by the short or long version of their first name if this is not what they want.

On the previous page HalfFull mentioned terms sometimes used in the UK such as "lovey" or "flower". These are awful. There are often regional variations in use of these terms and in some regions, e.g. the midlands, some people even call each other "duck" which to me sounds ridiculous.

On a final, more positive note. I occasionally get older people refer to me as "young man" and I do find this rather flattering as my youthful days are long over! While this term (or "young lady" for a woman) is often used politely and warmly it can sometimes be used ironically or even contemptuously, e.g. when telling someone off or belittling them. 

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Aeolienne
On 3/10/2019 at 5:38 PM, HalfFull said:

I also don't like the terms mate, man, hun, babe and Someone who can hit the ground running.

When someone on Plenty of Fish called me hun I asked how he knew I was of German descent.

My pet peeves are the overuse of the word like, especially in "I was like" used to mean "I said", and beginning sentences with a redundant "so".

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Nesf
9 hours ago, Aeolienne said:

My pet peeves are the overuse of the word like, especially in "I was like" used to mean "I said", and beginning sentences with a redundant "so".

One of my pet peeves is the over-use of the word "really". Some people use this in almost every sentence! Also, the over-use of reduntant use of the expression "kind of". For example, "It's kind of sad". This makes no sense - either it is sad, or it isn't sad!

A while ago I opened a thread with the title "pet peeves", then someone replied that the phrases "pet peeves" was pet peeve for them.

Edited by Nesf

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Max000
On 3/12/2019 at 2:31 AM, Sanctuary said:

I don't like expressions which intentionally and unnecessarily use bad grammar such as "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". Why not "if it isn't broken, leave it alone"? Not as snappy perhaps but the ungrammatical form grates on me. There is a lot of bad grammar in song lyrics and most of the time the writers do know how to write grammatically. It doesn't really bother me but I sometimes wish they broke out of the cliche and wrote the same lyrics grammatically. Of course many of the lyrics would then be longer or wouldn't scan so well but I'm sure they could do it if they tried. As regards song lyrics generally there seems to be a repertoire of terms which seem to bear little relation to real life language - has anyone ever called their partner or love-interest "baby"? For this and many other reasons I rarely pay attention to song lyrics and focus more on the vocals and delivery as so many song lyrics are banal or cliched - not that it stops the songs as a whole from being great.

In the UK - mainly among those of middle-age or over - it's common to hear people address others as "love", e.g. "are you alright, love?" - this makes no sense as there isn't a romantic relationship between them or often any relationship as they may well be strangers. Often these terms are used unthinkingly out of habit but I would rather we used words that had meaning and feeling behind them. 

That is a Southern US phrase, that was popularized by Thomas Bertram "Bert" Lance in a magazine  article in 1977.  Personally  I'm not a grammar Nazi, so it really doesn't bother me. Like it or not, the phrase does seem to have struck a chord, with many people all over the world. So it's probably not going to go away anytime soon.

Quote

Bert Lance believes he can save Uncle Sam billions if he can get the government to adopt a simple motto: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." He explains: "That's the trouble with government: Fixing things that aren't broken and not fixing things that are broken."

 

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RiRi

I used to not like the slang "What's up?" People seemed to always say this to me through text when a conversation was starting I think both when I was in high school and uni. I didn't even know what exactly this meant and I think I even searched it up or maybe just got the hang of it and understood it as just meaning what are you doing? or something like that. So I learned what to say in response but it always seemed weird to me. Looking at it right now, what's up? could just be like what's up in the sky. I wonder how people came up with it. 

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Aeolienne
On ‎3‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 5:38 PM, HalfFull said:

I'm not going to tell people not to use them but I dislike the f word, the c word and the t word.

From what I can discern from the soundtrack of Trapped, the F word is the same in Icelandic. Must have been the pesky Vikings who introduced it to these fair shores.

By contrast, Swedish has very few swear words. Unlike us Brits, they don't find bodily functions obscene (evidently); instead they rely on "helvete" [hell] and "fan" [the devil], emphasised with "tusen" [thousand].

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Sanctuary

Another term I don't like is "whodunit" to refer to a crime mystery in literature, film or TV. Another example of bad grammar and "whodidit" would sound much better. However some of these terms / expressions become so entrenched that trying to change them is very difficult.

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