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StarlessEclipse

Autistic people have fewer rights than animals

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StarlessEclipse

https://inews.co.uk/opinion/columnists/mendip-house-autism-abuse-failings/

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/mar/10/cqc-rebuked-for-failure-to-prosecute-national-autistic-society-over-mendip-house-care-home-abuse

Quote

Abuse of human beings with autism by a gang of bullies is deemed worthy only of a fine similar in size to those handed out for speeding or being drunk in public

The abuse, the bullying, the cruelty were simply grotesque. One person is said to have been made to eat a pizza covered in mustard, then some yogurt with more mustard, which left them being sick – only for their vomit to be put in a glass of water they were forced to drink. Another terrified resident was slapped, ordered to eat chilli and repeatedly thrown in a swimming pool. A third had a ribbon put round their neck and was ridden ‘like a horse.’ Others had to crawl on all fours and had cake thrown at them.This barbarity took place in a care home that was being controlled by a gang of abusive men – and the salaries of the brutes behind this torture of people with autism was funded by taxpayers.

Staff were reportedly seen playing on computer games rather than doing their duties and failing to notice one woman had absconded. They even took money from residents to buy themselves meals. Yet last week it emerged the owners of this centre would not face prosecution for such disgusting failings. They were just asked to pay a £4,000 fixed penalty notice as if guilty of a traffic offence.

This news made few headlines – although such a risible fine was barely more than one week’s funding for one of those unfortunate residents. There have been no criminal prosecutions. Yet these events at Mendip House in Somerset were the most disturbing such abuse to emerge since the scandal of Winterbourne View was exposed eight years ago by the BBC’s Panorama expose. Yet again we see how people with autism and learning disabilities are taunted, teased and tormented in a society that has so little sympathy for its most excluded minority.

The Mendip House horror story shows again how people with autism and learning disabilities are treated with such crushing contempt by those claiming to protect them, speak for them and safeguard them. A teenager was jailed recently for cruelty to a kitten while a woman was imprisoned for failing to feed her dogs properly. But sustained and systemic abuse of human beings with autism by a gang of bullies is deemed worthy only of a fine similar in size to those handed out for speeding or being drunk in public. Unfortunately no-one really seems to care for such people, beyond their shattered families – and this is a sickening reflection on our society.

This sets a deeply disturbing precedent. Autistic people in Britain effectively have less of a right to legal recourse than animals.

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Peridot

You know what they say about bullies: they're cowards. They only attack those they see as vulnerable.

I'd say society is in a state of decay. Many people do awful things because "it doesn't matter" or because they seem to think they can get away with everything… It's just depraved. No honor. No loyalty. No soul. No dignity. No humanity. It's just horrible out there a lot of the time. Which is why I tend to stay in. Sat in front of the TV.

Tonight I'm going to watch a Tom Hanks movie called Inferno which also has the Star wars girl in it from Rogue one. She's so attractive. Boy what I wouldn't go through for a pleasant evening with her. I'd probably take on a T-Rex with my bare hands, StarlessEclipse. That T-Rex would go home crying to his mum after I'd be through with him.

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RiRi

This is disgusting and truly saddening @StarlessEclipse. I would never think that the UK has low standards to their people with disabilities. 

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Peridot
1 hour ago, RiRi said:

This is disgusting and truly saddening @StarlessEclipse. I would never think that the UK has low standards to their people with disabilities. 

The UK has low standards to their people period.

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Alice

@StarlessEclipse Theyre the kind of people who would pull wings off butterflies, they see something beautiful, fragile, vulnerable and only want to destroy it. Its disgusting
I really dont see how someone can look at an autistic person or anyone with a disability and do this, they already suffer enough just being in this damn world.

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Sanctuary

Encountering vulnerability often brings out the best people - and indeed it should. Unfortunately it can also bring out the worst as it has done in the above example. Some people see vulnerability with indifference, contempt and even as an opportunity to engage in cruelty, abuse and exploitation. Often these things go on because the abuse is undetected, due to lack of monitoring or detected but ignored. There are few cases of serious wrong-doing which are carried out by one person in secret with no-one else aware. There are usually others - sometimes many people - who know or suspect what is going on but do nothing. Some take no action because of "loyalty" to their colleagues, friends or family members. Others are scared of retaliation and when the abuse occurs in a workplace as above there is a fear of their career being damaged or even being sacked. For all the employer talk about "protecting whistle-blowers" this is rarely the case and bosses would rather cover things up and find ways of removing the whistle-blower. Action will usually only be taken if the perpetrator is an unpopular or fringe member of staff and those who commit abuse and are more powerful or well-connected often go on doing so for many years. Even when action is taken it will usually be handled internally with the organisation keeping matters away from the police to avoid damage to their "reputation". it's a dispiriting situation but we have seen it so many times across so many parts of society.

Penalties are of course another issue and inadequate sanctions are another reason why abuse goes on. In particular we lack a proper system for tackling organisations that are involved in abuse. An organisation can't be put in prison and any fine will either be inconsequential compared to profits or it will be passed on to users through increased fees. It's important the sanctions fall on the individuals at the top of the organisations which have allowed abuse to occur.  

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RiRi
9 hours ago, Sanctuary said:

Penalties are of course another issue and inadequate sanctions are another reason why abuse goes on. In particular we lack a proper system for tackling organisations that are involved in abuse. An organisation can't be put in prison and any fine will either be inconsequential compared to profits or it will be passed on to users through increased fees. It's important the sanctions fall on the individuals at the top of the organisations which have allowed abuse to occur.  

This is what I was referring to in my first post. The people running the penalties/sanctions seem like people who don't care for people with disabilities. They should have gotten a harsher sanction/punishment/penalty. 

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