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leyper

Does anyone of this ring any bells?

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leyper
2 hours ago, Sanctuary said:

This is a good point. Diagnosis of autism and many other conditions seem to revolve around clinicians or other experts ultimately giving a "yes" or "no" answer. There is resistance to the idea of degrees of autism except between "high" and "low functioning" autism - many people are unhappy with the idea that someone could be "partly autistic" or in some sort of hybrid state. The reality is though of a spectrum and while some people seem very obviously to be autistic and many others very obviously neurotypical there are individuals for whom it is difficult to decide. A clinician or an expert would have to make a "yes" or "no" decision which can be a simplistic response but often they have no alternative as a decision has to be made. Perhaps we can liken it to passing or failing an exam. Exam boards have to set an overall pass mark or grade but it is possible for someone to "pass" very marginally and another person to "fail" very narrowly; it's also possible that a different marker or assessor might have reversed these decisions. 

Going back to leyper's situation, online tests are certainly useful and in some instances they point very clearly towards or away from autism but in others the results are inconclusive. It's then necessary to examine the test questions and life history in much more depth to see how deep or persistent are the potentially autistic characteristics. This can be done by oneself but discussion with others can be useful and - if so desired - this is what an expert considering a diagnosis would do. Reading more about autism and exploring this forum will certainly help to give a clearer indication. Finally it's worth making the point that even if autism is not the ultimate decision there may be other conditions at work such as social anxiety and these other conditions may also be present with autism.

I certainly found with the standard online test that my answers to many of the questions came with a caveat ("Yes, but...") because the suggested answers to the scenarios weren't exactly how I would react. But then, it could be me over-analyzing my own answers to an Asperger's Test...... 🙂

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leyper
18 hours ago, RiRi said:

@leyperHi, welcome to the forum! 🙂 Yep, a lot of it rings a bell for me. The saying something offensive without realizing and then trying to fix it and making it worse. The not being shy and being able to go up to someone but not being able to hold the conversation. Your shutdowns. I don't know too much about it but some people on the spectrum are more prone to shutdowns than meltdowns or viceversa or both. I feel like you might be on the spectrum. Someone on here has said that people who come here and have researched and come to the conclusion that they're on the spectrum usually are/are. Some of the things you've mentioned don't apply to me but I have seen other people on this forum that do. Like, not being forgiving, some people on here seem like that. I think this relates to the inability to let go which can manifest differently amongst people on the spectrum. Everyone on the spectrum is different. 

I hope my post has been helpful in some way and wish you good luck if you decide to go for an official diagnosis. 🙂

Thanks. I should clarify that I'm forgiving in a lot of cases, but if someone betrays my trust or  is disloyal to me I do find it very hard. There have been cases where I have literally never spoken to people again after feeling betrayed by them. "That's it - you're gone from my life" kind of thing. It doesn't happen often, but it does happen.

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leyper
3 hours ago, Nesf said:

I can relate to a lot of what you said, though I don't easily form deep connections to people, and I have a lot of difficuties with humour. I over-think and over-analyse, and often over-react to things. Social events tend to go for me as you described, though nowadays I rarely attend social events.

Hi. Weirdly, the deep connections I make seem to usually be one-way, like I latch onto an aspect of a person or maybe something they are going through or have been through that resonates with one of my own experiences - and it's like I feel we're suddenly soul-mates (although it's only me who feels that way). 😐

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Peridot
On ‎3‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 10:01 PM, RiRi said:

Maybe you don't have the major things that would make you autistic? Do you have sensory issues, meltdowns/shutdowns, insistence in sameness, rigidity in thinking? If you don't have those or didn't have them as a child then you could just have social anxiety or something related. 

I used to have obsessive compulsive disorder which I think is a common comorbidity of AS? Not sure. Where I feel "autistic" is e.g. in how I tend to communicate verbally more than non-verbally. I understand non-verbal things, I can read facial expressions and so on but a lot of people use non-verbal way more than verbal where they communicate what would be an an entire page in written form using a single look. I don't usually do that for instance.

I don't have any of the traits you listed… Although the rigidity in thinking I used to show when I had OCD where I was very non-flexible in certain ways but that was due to the OCD which I don't have anymore.

Edited by Peridot

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