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Dr-David-Banner

Do You Feel Like The "One Out" here?

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Dr-David-Banner

 

This amazing little video reflects how I felt often. In fact, at this very moment in time I could take a pic of scenes just like the above. The video was based on Einstein's prediction that technology would give rise to a generation of idiots. This seems like a huge contradiction in terms and paradoxical. How can technology dumb people down? The answer can be more simply explained if you use some examples: We all know that in everyday life, you can make a choice either to use the lift or walk up the stairs. Most of us will understand that waking the steps is harder than taking a lift but both options will have the same outcome -= you will reach the top floor regardless. There is a catch, though. Each time we take the lift, catch the bus or drive a car, we work "less" physically. So, we become less physically fit. This is mainly why people have gotten fatter and less healthy than, say, in the 1960s. Now, if we compare this simple reality with the brain, really it is the same thing. Every time you use technology to make things easier, the less you depend upon your own brain to solve problems. Whereas in the past (1960s) computers were thought of as calculators and a means to process calculations, we ended up with social media instead. This latter basically "emphasises" socialising from the uploaded pics on Facebook to the games and social exchanges that dominate people these days. All the time it takes place, the brain is pretty much passive. So, latest research is showing not only are people getting physically unhealthier but, more so, less intelligent. Less likely to do courses or learn engineering skills or basically live around drive and initiative. Clearly the guy who did the video above has been feeling the same as me (check out the sad, bewildered solitary face).

 

 

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Dr-David-Banner

I chose the path of rebellion and do my best to turn 180 degrees from the consumer-dependency-reliance pattern. Where there is a harder way to calculate a problem, I take the hard option. That means old graphs from the late 1950s to work out calculus (to force the brain to "work". That's how NASA did the maths in the Apollo missions. I try to avoid stuff like Google Translate but use a plain bilingual dictionary. I try at all costs to not sacrifice personal potential to the easy, quick fix Google option. I mean, thousands of years evolution programmed us to struggle and adapt - not vegetate. Amazingly, none other than H G Wells also predicted human beings would lose the drive to break barriers and push forwards. In The Time Machine future humans are reduced to a passive, listless state.

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Dr-David-Banner

I showed the video to a woman at a college yesterday and she was stunned. "That's just what it's like!", she said. As we spoke, two teenagers suddenly burst into laughter over a cartoon on their public p.c. Others wandered around the building, talking aloud with earplugs on and phone held upwards. If I ever encounter anyone happily listening to Tchaikovsky, I will probably pass out in shock. 

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Ace

I find this topic very controversial even to myself. While yes there are a lot of idiots in this modern age, there are also a lot of benefits to technology like smart phones. Like just now I looked up who Tchaikovsky was and started listening to some of his compositions (I actually do like it and I'm still listening while typing this). Although for someone like me, I don't really use my phone for social media or gaming. I only really like the nice camera that I can carry with me anywhere, listening to music anywhere, and the occasional posting of photos to Instagram which is really for my own sake of record/memory. The convenience of looking anything up and getting answers (as long as you know how to tell right from wrong) is nice, although I'm also the type of person that looks up the method to find the answer myself (in school anyways). 

But yes I do see a real problem in a lot of other people. Take gaming as an example. While gaming is really just a different form of self entertainment, like watching TV or reading books or painting, I have seen it consume people. And I have seen people addicted to TV or alcohol or drugs. I think there are always going to be those people that get addicted and especially with something like gaming. It is so easy to access, is sometimes completely free if not just a one time charge, and there is such a big community around it. 

But even for people that don't game, or don't have an adictive personality, it seems social media in general is almost a negative. In it's conception, which I personally mark it when Facebook blew up, it was really meant to have a different faster form of communication. Now it has become a status symbol, a part of peoples lives, a projection of ones self to others which is almost always an exaggeration, or misleading. People only post the good things in their life which has a subtle but building effect on others where they think of themselves lower than everything they see on social media. This is really getting into the psychology of social media but I think you get the point. 

As for the short cuts offered by technology, I think there is still something to be said about the actual ability of the user. While I've heard the argument "why do I need to learn this math, my calculator can do it" I strongly think you need to know how the math works to be able to know what to put in the calculator. Or you need to know the physics in order to generate a math equation in order to plug into the calculator. Then you have to know how that number is used. I do feel that we are at a point where technology has jumped a lot recently, offering much simpler lives and yes, that makes us lazy or dumb, but that's only because we have yet to find something to replace that effort. Technology is saposed to make our lives easier so we can focus our efforts on something else but so far there isn't much else for a lot of people so they just resort to social media or games to fill their time. 

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Dr-David-Banner
On Sunday, September 08, 2019 at 11:49 AM, Ace said:

I find this topic very controversial even to myself. While yes there are a lot of idiots in this modern age, there are also a lot of benefits to technology like smart phones. Like just now I looked up who Tchaikovsky was and started listening to some of his compositions (I actually do like it and I'm still listening while typing this). Although for someone like me, I don't really use my phone for social media or gaming. I only really like the nice camera that I can carry with me anywhere, listening to music anywhere, and the occasional posting of photos to Instagram which is really for my own sake of record/memory. The convenience of looking anything up and getting answers (as long as you know how to tell right from wrong) is nice, although I'm also the type of person that looks up the method to find the answer myself (in school anyways). 

But yes I do see a real problem in a lot of other people. Take gaming as an example. While gaming is really just a different form of self entertainment, like watching TV or reading books or painting, I have seen it consume people. And I have seen people addicted to TV or alcohol or drugs. I think there are always going to be those people that get addicted and especially with something like gaming. It is so easy to access, is sometimes completely free if not just a one time charge, and there is such a big community around it. 

But even for people that don't game, or don't have an adictive personality, it seems social media in general is almost a negative. In it's conception, which I personally mark it when Facebook blew up, it was really meant to have a different faster form of communication. Now it has become a status symbol, a part of peoples lives, a projection of ones self to others which is almost always an exaggeration, or misleading. People only post the good things in their life which has a subtle but building effect on others where they think of themselves lower than everything they see on social media. This is really getting into the psychology of social media but I think you get the point. 

As for the short cuts offered by technology, I think there is still something to be said about the actual ability of the user. While I've heard the argument "why do I need to learn this math, my calculator can do it" I strongly think you need to know how the math works to be able to know what to put in the calculator. Or you need to know the physics in order to generate a math equation in order to plug into the calculator. Then you have to know how that number is used. I do feel that we are at a point where technology has jumped a lot recently, offering much simpler lives and yes, that makes us lazy or dumb, but that's only because we have yet to find something to replace that effort. Technology is saposed to make our lives easier so we can focus our efforts on something else but so far there isn't much else for a lot of people so they just resort to social media or games to fill their time. 

You might find this hard to believe but the early 1960s radio transmitter maths I do goes beyond modern web resources. Levels have fallen! I was asking 50s textbook questions on huge American tech sites and the new generation don't know. Nobody could help me. What I finally did was use the textbook graphs to find the answers and then go through the calculus till it matched. These books I use are very dated but the engineers back then knew their stuff. Material online is all based on semiconductor, maybe digitalised processing. The older technology is barely being taught anywhere. The older textbooks are simpler circuit wise but demand understanding given the voltages can be around 2000 volts.

Edited by Dr-David-Banner

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Dr-David-Banner

The point I guess is it's not that the net is essentially a bad thing but the problem is "balance". As Einstein stated he feared the day technology would "surpass" intelect. Tesla had predicted something.similar. The serious issue now is technolgy has surpassed human potential. It's not balanced as it was when we all bought technological "products" from Japan like VCR, instamatic cameras, hi-fi decks and so forth. These items needed skilled service engineers to learn the skills to do repairs. It created skilled jobs and involvement by people from the rental VHF store to the big Panasonic corporations. If you chew it over you will see these days basically people are needed less. Most engineering may be carried out as software programming where tech items are sort of run on a program ( but not engineered by anyone who understands how it all works). That is, modern tech is too complex to "engineer" so the circuits pretty much evolve on tiny, digitalised boards. Then get passed down the line. By contrast the Japanese in the 1980s did know how their polaroid cameras worked but these highly qualified personnel are no longer needed. A big plus too to the issue is people are overwhelmed by technology as it's too complex. So they switch off and schools don't teach electrical sciences which is a science where we can accomplish a lot! I mean, even in the sixties we still had internet even if it was simpler and became an interest where people built their own transmitters or receivers. So to put the cards on the table, really this is a real threat in the true sense of the word. People are losing control and gradually allowing technology to dominate their life, as opposed to the far better option of taking part in a process. At present it's evidenced by a huge surge in social media and most trade or even banking being done online. The level of dependency increases. The next step I guess would be people allowing networks to literally run their lives in a way human intellect goes into freefall. This may sound comical and.fictional but intelligence "evolved" through challenge and a need to solve all types of problems. Based on observation.and comparisons over three or so decades, I would say education, employment, social welfare and even science (as a subject).has declined.

Edited by Dr-David-Banner

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Ace
20 minutes ago, Dr-David-Banner said:

You might find this hard to believe but the early 1960s radio transmitter maths I do goes beyond modern web resources. Levels have fallen! I was asking 50s textbook questions on huge American tech sites and the new generation don't know. Nobody could help me. What I finally did was use the textbook graphs to find the answers and then go through the calculus till it matched. These books I use are very dated but the engineers back then knew their stuff. Material online is all based on semiconductor, maybe digitalised processing. The older technology is barely being taught anywhere. The older textbooks are simpler circuit wise but demand understanding given the voltages can be around 2000 volts.

Yes, I have run into some topics or very specific technical questions that are just hard to find on the internet. I would imagine that's because they are outdated or way to small of a knowledge base/community around it. I'm not sure how accurate this is, but I've been told Google has only documented less than 1% of the entire internet. 

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