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Dr-David-Banner

Psychopathy and Asperger

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Dr-David-Banner

Not many people are aware Asperger extensively dealt with psychopathy, which I will now explain. It is a highly complex state of mind I often think is best explained by someone with the condition. Psychopathy is tied in with apparent low emotional responsiveness. Emotional response or ability to share emotions of others is very offset. My belief is the emotions do exist but don't trigger in synch with responses of others. Sometimes the emotions don't seem to work because the mind is more inwardly focused. It was noticed babies who soon developed autism didn't react to external stimulae or cling to their mother. The reason psychopathy has such a bad name is pretty much everyone fears those of us who lack emotional empathy. All normal people will register concern or sorrow when someone else has had bad news or whatever. With psychopathy you often don't react emotionally at all. You tend to try and solve the problem. Likewise you don't tend to feel a part of anything or included in either family or surroundings. Likewise, difficulty recognising faces is part of psychopathy because people are remote from your own inner universe. My estimation is that those of us who have deep psychopathy aren't generally accepted by normal people. I now understand why that is because humans evolved to share their feelings and form deep bonds. In crisis situations they huddle together to survive.

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Dr-David-Banner

If we ditch political correctness and misguided attempts to spare peoples feelings, we can address some core questions: Do those of us with psychopathy reject the opportunity to be normal? When an autistic child doesn't cling to his or her mother, what does that mean? The cause? Parental issues, biological infection at pregnancy or just psychological? Personally my own connection with my parents is as if they were strangers. Very little emotional connection at all. Add to that resentments parents will feel where that void exists. My best friend of years ago who had severe autism was especially remote from his mother. It was like a wall of ice. Whereas his normal sister had s normal family connection. And once again, the reason I have this real interest in the Carnival Of Souls movie is the film hits upon all of this in a way that you have a kind of role model. Mary couldn't hold down a job as church organist not because she couldn't play the organ. The problem was she was unable to share the feelings and values of others. She didn't understand why she couldn't play spooky fairground organ music in a church. For her, the church was just a place of work. Likewise she was often just not noticed by others as if invisible.

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Dr-David-Banner

My theory is based on my own experiences. I think with psychopathy you simply don't form a connection with other people. This happens from early infancy. Why it happens we do not know. As this break continues to develop over time we are likewise not accepted by normal people because we are noticed as different and emotionally remote. We have to learn morals and ethics differently and far less through being integrated. Some psychologists will take some of these symptoms and call it "screening" but my experience is psychopathy is what it is. Low emotional responsiveness, lack of inclusion or connection and an intellectual over-ride that will replace emotional intelligence. And to echoe Carnival Of Souls I can say in honesty the ability to show deep affection to another person is beyond me. Sure, I can help someone who's injured or in need of help but not form intimate connections. As in Carnival Of Souls, "You don't like to dance. You don't like to drink and you don't like for anyone to hold you close"

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Alice

Arnt you just dissociated from your body? (from early trauma perhaps) Your emotions can only be experienced when truly present in your body.
Your posts always seem very disconnected from reality - just hopping from one thought tangent/branch to another, without any groundedness in reality, in my opinion, with little to no capacity for true conversation/back and forth (I struggle with this in-person, as an autistic person due to sensory overload, but am fine to do so online so I find it odd - you only seem to continue to respond to yourself, not really to others).

From psychology, in studies of criminal psychopathy, psychopaths have very low skin conductivity - like their skin is a solid barrier (opposite to autism, ADD, or anxious people who are easily influenced by the environment, peoples energy, other bioelectrical energy, sensory info and who receive too much). This is why psychopaths can fake a lie detectors, and autistics are well known for their blatant honesty and difficulty telling or maintaining a lie.

If you are a psychopath why are you on an autism forum?

Edited by Alice

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Peridot

Psychoclick.

For adults with psychopathic and sociopathic disorders.

😨

 

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RiRi

I didn't realize how insightful this thread is. I want to be psychoanalyzed by @Alice. I honestly never realized what this guy @Dr-David-Banner had. I do agree that at times it seemed like he never had a back and forth with people, like a conversation. And one time I was going to tell him that he just seems to post and post and never reply to anyone because I think he did it to me quite a lot. I felt ignored by him except this one time I found that he replied to me in a manner that no one else does on this forum which is to manually quote instead of using the forum's tool. And then respond with something else. I never knew that perhaps the reason why I didn't understand plenty of his posts was because he mainly talked about things in his mind. He seemed to reply to @Nesf a lot. Maybe she understood his thoughts more.

I actually didn't even know how @Dr-David-Banner is. And you know what? Not everyone knows who Dr-David-Banner is. Probably all the marvel nerds do, though. So that a**shole who said everyone does was just a f*cking jerk.

Edited by RiRi

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RiRi

I have noticed that you @Dr-David-Banner seem to want to talk about psychopathy and autism a lot. You talked awhile ago about something like it used to be called psychopathy disorder. I actually know about that and sometimes people get the names wrong. I feel like the psychologists who've chosen what names to give a set of behaviors , diagnoses, don't chose appropriate names. Like at some point being a psychopath was antisocial personality disorder. But then again, a lot of people refer to not liking socializing a lot is being antisocial. Like, I'm antisocial, but it doesn't mean I have antisocial personality disorder so now that I know this it's weird to say I'm antisocial because my mind knows that there's a thing called antisocial personality disorder which could be a serial killer which I am not. It's unfortunate that they gave this light adjective to mean something as huge as a serial killer. When at some point I viewed it as just not liking socializing.

I deferred to much from what I wanted to say. The point I'm trying to make is that sometimes they just get the name wrong in the diagnostic manual or the name they refer to things but that is more important are the behaviors described. 

 I watched this show that mentioned that autism and being a sociopath/psychopath were polar opposites. I don't remember much why but I think what @Alice is saying is what they meant. That people with autism feel too much and sociopaths/psychopaths don't. This figuratively and physically. 

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RiRi

Now, when you refer to people not being attached to the mother, etc. It could just be accounted for in the difference of personality. Everyone, autistic or not has a different personality, not even identical twins are exactly the same. Despite having the same DNA, they are different. For instance, even their finger prints are different. That is due to environment. One of them could be on the side where the heart of the mom is heard more/less and that could be one way they will differ. One is born first, another way. They could be the most similar but not completely similar.

I think people who are detached from the mother maybe didn't realize things much. There are some people who are like this. There are others that are the opposite. Something in your genetics + your environment caused this. Science doesn't know what exactly could have caused it. It might take millions of years to discover it, if ever. We don't know if maybe the mother was detached from their child and didn't speak to them much often which created this detached attachment or maybe he could have been attached but then the mother left and so the child learned never get too close to people because there's a chance that someday they might leave you. And the change might have made this child depressed despite being so young and knowing nothing about the world. Despite them being just babies. So the mind of a baby took a note never to get attached to people because they might leave you. I don't think that it is changeable because it's how the brain was wired during development years. 

I hope that helps. 

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Dr-David-Banner

The term "psychopathy'" is not the same as the movie term and was not used by Asperger in that sense. A movie "psychopath" has excellent social skills whereas, with autistic psychopathy, there is very poor personal connection and poor interaction. The actual term for what they called Asperger Syndrome was Schizoid Avoidant Psychopathy, first used by a Jewish clinician called Suharova. Asperger probably read her research and himself called the condition Autistic Psychopathy. When the founder of the modern diagnosis, Lorna Wing, read translated texts of Asperger and Leo Kanner, she admitted that in Britain there had been no solid research into the condition. She was pretty much alone as a psychiatrist but leaned towards Asperger's research. Some of this research I suspect she misunderstood. More to the point Asperger Syndrome was tactfully interpreted and care was taken not to offend. Nobody discussed psychopathy for obvious reasons and also the fact by the 1980s the term had a more criminal interpretation. Yet, psychopathy was understood by Asperger to denote a cut-off from reality, similar to schizophrenia. Yet, the cut off was an inward withdrawel from the world and a different perception of reality and not a total loss of reality as in psychosis.

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Dr-David-Banner

The core of Asperger's autistic psychopathy I have been able to better understand through research I now have from the USSR. Case files and clinic files from the 1970s and 1980s. The symptoms are: Low emotional awareness and intelligence and lack of intuitive learning or "mimicry". In early infancy lack of response to external stimulae and occasionally not clinging to parents. Not recognising people which later becomes face blindness. Low emotional response. Poor attention to react to external interaction. Obvious learning difficulties resulting from poor social and family connection. Dominant linguistic ability at the cost of poor motor co-ordination with time/spatial impairment. Although some occasionally show maths ability and a very close bond to their mother. Opposition to change in routine or surroundings. Repetitive bodily movements or hand flapping and rocking. Rapid transition of thought or intention with no basis or plan to the scheme of things. That is, actions are seemingly disjointed (but I don't view this as disfunctional to learning). Cramming of information sometimes at the expense of a functional knowledge of the subject. Monotone voice. Lack of facial expressiveness and eye expression. Unusual use of language and poor handwriting. Physical signs such as muscle tone and especially digestive problems. Pretty much all of these symptoms were described by Asperger. Most interesting was Soviet psychiatrists noted lack of conventional motivation and un-coordinated activity. Soviet research was well ahead except sadly all sorts of drugs were used.

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